19

When I run something like the following from the command line, what really happens?

> scala hello.scala

Is there a hello.class generated, executed, and then discarded? Or does Scala behave somehow like an interpreter in this case? I am just thinking that, of course, I cannot do the same for Java:

> java hello.java
24

Yes, there is a hello.class generated. The compiler will wrap your code inside a Main object, compile it then execute Main.main, given hello.scala of

println(args.mkString)
println(argv.mkString)

If you run with the -Xprint:parser option: scala -Xprint:parser hello.scala foo bar you'll see how the code gets rewritten:

package <empty> {
  object Main extends scala.ScalaObject {
    def <init>() = {
      super.<init>();
      ()
    };
    def main(argv: Array[String]): scala.Unit = {
      val args = argv;
      {
        final class $anon extends scala.AnyRef {
          def <init>() = {
            super.<init>();
            ()
          };
          println(args.mkString);
          println(argv.mkString)
        };
        new $anon()
      }
    }
  }
}

This code is then compiled (I believe to a memory filesystem - but I'm not sure) and executed. Looking at ScriptRunner, I see that a temporary directory is created under the default temp folder. For instance looking at my system, I see a bunch of %TEMP%/scalascript* folders.

Note that even in the interpreter, the code is not interpreted. See Scala: Is there a default class if no class is defined? for more info (it's really being rewritten, compiled and evaluated).

| improve this answer | |
  • How does the compiler make val args = argv? What if one types println(arguments.mkString)? Will there be a val arguments = argv? – Peter Schmitz Oct 5 '11 at 11:20
  • @PeterSchmitz, args and argv are hard-coded, see github.com/scala/scala/blob/master/src/compiler/scala/tools/nsc/… and around line 388. Those names are simply conventions from C (argv) and Java programming (args). If you type println(arguments.mkString) you'll get a compiler error because arguments is not defined. – huynhjl Oct 5 '11 at 14:10
  • Thanks, didn´t know that. Though I´m a bit surprised! As far as I learned "hard-coded" isn´t good in general... – Peter Schmitz Oct 5 '11 at 16:28
  • @Peter it's just an identifier, like the entry method is called main, and the method for printing something is called println. I don't see the problem or why you would want it any other way... after all it's got to be called something – Luigi Plinge Oct 5 '11 at 18:55
  • @LuigiPlinge Acknowledged, println and especially main are also "hard-coded", but I was confused that a method argument name like args was "hard-coded" then (but I´m fine with that, there has to be a name for args, because not explicitly statable), which I can choose when having the main method in class filled by myself instead of been constructed by the REPL(or perhaps extending App). Everything´s fine :D – Peter Schmitz Oct 5 '11 at 20:48

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