My problem lies with trying to access Scanner scan created in one method from another method. It says it cannot find variable scan. I tried declaring a global Scanner scan, but it gave me an error, non static variable name cannot be referenced from a static context. How can I access this variable?

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

public class MyClass {
    public static void myMethod() {
        final File f = new File("file.txt");
        Scanner scan = null;
        try {
            scan = new Scanner(f);
        }
        catch(FileNotFoundException ex) {
            System.exit(0);
        }
    }

    public static boolean anotherMethod() {
        final String s = scan.next ();

        if (s.equalsIgnoreCase ("true"))  return true;
        if (s.equalsIgnoreCase ("false")) return false;

        throw new java.util.InputMismatchException ();
    }
}
  • Make it as a class filed private Scanner scan = null; – Eng.Fouad Oct 5 '11 at 5:57
  • Just tried that, the 'scan' within the Try{} gave me error "non-static variable scan cannot be referenced from a static context". :/ – Ruben Martinez Jr. Oct 5 '11 at 6:02
  • That did solve that error, thank you so much! Bonus points: That int m and int m under readBoolean2D method are giving me null pointer exceptions when I run the program. Any ideas? – Ruben Martinez Jr. Oct 5 '11 at 6:09
  • @user979501: Yes - you're only creating the scanner after you've tried to read from it. Scanners aren't neutrinos - they can't travel backwards in time :) See my answer. – Jon Skeet Oct 5 '11 at 6:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You've only declared the scan variable within the flow method. If you want to use that value within the other methods, you'll need to take one of two courses of action:

  • Declare it as a non-local variable
  • Pass it into those other methods via a parameter

As all your methods are static, for the first option you'd need to declare it as:

private static Scanner scan;

However, currently the flow method seems to do two radically different things:

  • It creates the Scanner (but doesn't actually use it)
  • It tries to use data which it expects to have already been read

It looks to me like you should be creating the Scanner in your main method (or in a new method which is called before readBoolean2D, anyway). You're currently calling readBoolean2D as the very first action of the program, trying to read from a variable which doesn't exist, before any Scanner has even been created.

Note that none of this has anything to do with the try block itself - it's the fact that the variable is declared in a separate method which is the problem (and the timing of the method calls), not the try block.

I would try to think of restructuring the program as:

  • Open input
  • Read all the data
  • Process all the data

I suspect you can actually get away with just local variables and parameters - the first method would return a Scanner; the second method would take a Scanner and return the data it reads; the third method would take the data.

The scan variable has to be global, and static, since your methods are static. If you want to access it from another method, or even another class, it will have to be declared globally.

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

public class VerticalPercolation {

    private static Scanner scanner;

    public static boolean[][] flow (final boolean[][] open) {
        // ...
    }

    public static boolean percolates (final boolean[][] open) {
        // ...
    }

    public static boolean[][] random (final int n, final double p, final Random rnd) {
        // ...
    }

    public static boolean readBoolean () {
        // ...
    }

    public static boolean[][] readBoolean2D () {
        // ...
    }

    public static void print (final boolean[][] a) {
        // ...
    }

    public static void main (final String[] args) {
        scanner = new Scanner(...);
    }

}
  • Actually I wouldn't use a static variable here - I'd just use local variables and parameters. I see no reason to have global state in this particular case Aside from anything else, that clearly demonstrates the existing timing issue - we can't call flow first, as we haven't got the data... but to get the data, we need the Scanner. With Scanner as a parameter to the method which reads the data, it becomes more obvious that we need to call something to create the Scanner as the very first action. – Jon Skeet Oct 5 '11 at 6:11
  • That's how I would do it as well, but without knowing how his project layout is, or his programming techniques, I thought it'd be best just to follow the layout of this class. – user882347 Oct 5 '11 at 6:14
  • But the layout of his class can't possibly work - because flow needs to be given data, and the data can't be read until flow is called. Therefore restructuring is absolutely necessary, and I think it's worth making that clear. – Jon Skeet Oct 5 '11 at 6:22
public class VerticalPercolation {
      private static Scanner scan;
      //rest of the code

Hope that helps

The other answers suggest creating a static or global - ignore them.

You're creating the scanner scan in a function that does not use it, don't create it there, create it where it's needed.

readBoolean2D and readBoolean each need to take the scanner as an argument:

public static boolean[][] readBoolean2D (Scanner scan) {

main is where you need to create and use the scanner:

public static void main (final String[] args) throws IOException {
    final File f = new File("file.txt");
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(f);
    try {
        final boolean[][] open = readBoolean2D (scan);
        print (flow (open));
        System.out.println (percolates (open));
    } finally {
        scan.close();
    }
}

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