How do I get a list of all index & index columns in SQL Server 2005+? The closest I could get is:

select s.name, t.name, i.name, c.name from sys.tables t
inner join sys.schemas s on t.schema_id = s.schema_id
inner join sys.indexes i on i.object_id = t.object_id
inner join sys.index_columns ic on ic.object_id = t.object_id
inner join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id and
        ic.column_id = c.column_id

where i.index_id > 0    
 and i.type in (1, 2) -- clustered & nonclustered only
 and i.is_primary_key = 0 -- do not include PK indexes
 and i.is_unique_constraint = 0 -- do not include UQ
 and i.is_disabled = 0
 and i.is_hypothetical = 0
 and ic.key_ordinal > 0

order by ic.key_ordinal

Which is not exactly what I want.
What I want is, to list all user-defined indexes, (which means no indexes which support unique constraints & primary keys) with all columns (ordered by how do they appear in index definition) plus as much metadata as possible.

  • check out my solutions, which use SQL Server code to get the info – KM. Apr 20 '09 at 21:32
  • was my solution what you needed? – KM. Apr 22 '09 at 12:47
  • The above solution is elegant, but according to MS, INDEXKEY_PROPERTY is being deprecated. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186773.aspx – Lisa Dec 15 '10 at 14:29
  • Note that as user3101273 points out below, none of the answers include the index filter (filter_definition column from sys.indexes table). – influent Jan 26 '15 at 17:20

26 Answers 26

up vote 507 down vote accepted
+50

There are two "sys" catalog views you can consult:

select * from sys.indexes

select * from sys.index_columns

Those will give you just about any info you could possibly want about indices and their columns.

EDIT: This query's getting pretty close to what you're looking for:

SELECT 
     TableName = t.name,
     IndexName = ind.name,
     IndexId = ind.index_id,
     ColumnId = ic.index_column_id,
     ColumnName = col.name,
     ind.*,
     ic.*,
     col.* 
FROM 
     sys.indexes ind 
INNER JOIN 
     sys.index_columns ic ON  ind.object_id = ic.object_id and ind.index_id = ic.index_id 
INNER JOIN 
     sys.columns col ON ic.object_id = col.object_id and ic.column_id = col.column_id 
INNER JOIN 
     sys.tables t ON ind.object_id = t.object_id 
WHERE 
     ind.is_primary_key = 0 
     AND ind.is_unique = 0 
     AND ind.is_unique_constraint = 0 
     AND t.is_ms_shipped = 0 
ORDER BY 
     t.name, ind.name, ind.index_id, ic.index_column_id;
  • 2
    Yep, I'm aware of these, but I cannot arrange all the required "sys." catalogs so that they will produce meaningful output. – Anton Gogolev Apr 19 '09 at 19:06
  • 2
    New version is much better, but "and ind.is_unique = 0" is unneccessary: it filters out almost all required data. However, this query still includes too much system data, which I don't know how to get rid of. – Anton Gogolev Apr 19 '09 at 19:46
  • 3
    @My-Name-Is: the OP wanted to get all user-defined indexes (is_ms_shipped=0), but no primary keys (is_primary_key=0) and no indexes that are created to support unique constraints only (is_unique_constraint=0). – marc_s Jun 3 '13 at 18:45
  • 1
    Brilliant. Thank you, from this I can discover not only the clustered primary keys, as other solutions allowed (including the order of the column), but also if one of those columns is DESC not ASC! See in the output 'is_descending_key' – Nicholas Petersen Apr 30 '14 at 19:54
  • 3
    @ZainRizvi the WHERE (1=1) let him chain and reorder his AND ...s without worrying about which was first. See: stackoverflow.com/a/8149183/1160796 and stackoverflow.com/a/242831/1160796 – basher Dec 4 '14 at 16:34

You can use the sp_helpindex to view all the indexes of one table.

EXEC sys.sp_helpindex @objname = N'User' -- nvarchar(77)

And for all the indexes, you can traverse sys.objects to get all the indexes for each table.

  • 3
    Only problem with this is that it only includes the index key columns, not the included columns. – John Odom Jan 7 '15 at 16:18

None of the above did the job for me, but this does:

-- KDF9's concise index list for SQL Server 2005+  (see below for 2000)
--   includes schemas and primary keys, in easy to read format
--   with unique, clustered, and all ascending/descendings in a single column
-- Needs simple manual add or delete to change maximum number of key columns
--   but is easy to understand and modify, with no UDFs or complex logic
--
SELECT
  schema_name(schema_id) as SchemaName, OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id) as TableName, si.name as IndexName,
  (CASE is_primary_key WHEN 1 THEN 'PK' ELSE '' END) as PK,
  (CASE is_unique WHEN 1 THEN '1' ELSE '0' END)+' '+
  (CASE si.type WHEN 1 THEN 'C' WHEN 3 THEN 'X' ELSE 'B' END)+' '+  -- B=basic, C=Clustered, X=XML
  (CASE INDEXKEY_PROPERTY(si.object_id,index_id,1,'IsDescending') WHEN 0 THEN 'A' WHEN 1 THEN 'D' ELSE '' END)+
  (CASE INDEXKEY_PROPERTY(si.object_id,index_id,2,'IsDescending') WHEN 0 THEN 'A' WHEN 1 THEN 'D' ELSE '' END)+
  (CASE INDEXKEY_PROPERTY(si.object_id,index_id,3,'IsDescending') WHEN 0 THEN 'A' WHEN 1 THEN 'D' ELSE '' END)+
  (CASE INDEXKEY_PROPERTY(si.object_id,index_id,4,'IsDescending') WHEN 0 THEN 'A' WHEN 1 THEN 'D' ELSE '' END)+
  (CASE INDEXKEY_PROPERTY(si.object_id,index_id,5,'IsDescending') WHEN 0 THEN 'A' WHEN 1 THEN 'D' ELSE '' END)+
  (CASE INDEXKEY_PROPERTY(si.object_id,index_id,6,'IsDescending') WHEN 0 THEN 'A' WHEN 1 THEN 'D' ELSE '' END)+
  '' as 'Type',
  INDEX_COL(schema_name(schema_id)+'.'+OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id),index_id,1) as Key1,
  INDEX_COL(schema_name(schema_id)+'.'+OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id),index_id,2) as Key2,
  INDEX_COL(schema_name(schema_id)+'.'+OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id),index_id,3) as Key3,
  INDEX_COL(schema_name(schema_id)+'.'+OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id),index_id,4) as Key4,
  INDEX_COL(schema_name(schema_id)+'.'+OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id),index_id,5) as Key5,
  INDEX_COL(schema_name(schema_id)+'.'+OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id),index_id,6) as Key6
FROM sys.indexes as si
LEFT JOIN sys.objects as so on so.object_id=si.object_id
WHERE index_id>0 -- omit the default heap
  and OBJECTPROPERTY(si.object_id,'IsMsShipped')=0 -- omit system tables
  and not (schema_name(schema_id)='dbo' and OBJECT_NAME(si.object_id)='sysdiagrams') -- omit sysdiagrams
ORDER BY SchemaName,TableName,IndexName

-------------------------------------------------------------------
-- or to generate creation scripts put a simple wrapper around that
SELECT SchemaName, TableName, IndexName,
  (CASE pk
    WHEN 'PK' THEN 'ALTER '+
     'TABLE '+SchemaName+'.'+TableName+' ADD CONSTRAINT '+IndexName+' PRIMARY KEY'+
     (CASE substring(Type,3,1) WHEN 'C' THEN ' CLUSTERED' ELSE '' END)
    ELSE 'CREATE '+
     (CASE substring(Type,1,1) WHEN '1' THEN 'UNIQUE ' ELSE '' END)+
     (CASE substring(Type,3,1) WHEN 'C' THEN 'CLUSTERED ' ELSE '' END)+
     'INDEX '+IndexName+' ON '+SchemaName+'.'+TableName
    END)+
  ' ('+
    (CASE WHEN Key1 is null THEN '' ELSE      Key1+(CASE substring(Type,4+1,1) WHEN 'D' THEN ' DESC' ELSE '' END) END)+
    (CASE WHEN Key2 is null THEN '' ELSE ', '+Key2+(CASE substring(Type,4+2,1) WHEN 'D' THEN ' DESC' ELSE '' END) END)+
    (CASE WHEN Key3 is null THEN '' ELSE ', '+Key3+(CASE substring(Type,4+3,1) WHEN 'D' THEN ' DESC' ELSE '' END) END)+
    (CASE WHEN Key4 is null THEN '' ELSE ', '+Key4+(CASE substring(Type,4+4,1) WHEN 'D' THEN ' DESC' ELSE '' END) END)+
    (CASE WHEN Key5 is null THEN '' ELSE ', '+Key5+(CASE substring(Type,4+5,1) WHEN 'D' THEN ' DESC' ELSE '' END) END)+
    (CASE WHEN Key6 is null THEN '' ELSE ', '+Key6+(CASE substring(Type,4+6,1) WHEN 'D' THEN ' DESC' ELSE '' END) END)+
    ')' as CreateIndex
FROM (
  ...
  ...listing SQL same as above minus the ORDER BY...
  ...
  ) as indexes
ORDER BY SchemaName,TableName,IndexName

----------------------------------------------------------
-- For SQL Server 2000 the following should work
--   change table names to sysindexes and sysobjects (no dots)
--   change object_id => id, index_id => indid,
--   change is_primary_key => (select count(constid) from sysconstraints as sc where sc.id=si.id and sc.status&15=1)
--   change is_unique => INDEXPROPERTY(si.id,si.name,'IsUnique')
--   change si.type => INDEXPROPERTY(si.id,si.name,'IsClustered')
--   remove all references to schemas including schema name qualifiers, and the XML type
--   add select where indid<255 and si.status&64=0 (to omit the text/image index and autostats)

If your names include spaces, add square brackets around them in the creation scripts.

When the last Key column is all nulls, you know that none are missing.

Filtering out primary keys etc as in the original request is trivial.

NOTE: Take care with this solution as it doesn't distinguish indexed and included columns.

--Short and sweet:

SELECT OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(T.[object_id],DB_ID()) AS [Schema],  
  T.[name] AS [table_name], I.[name] AS [index_name], AC.[name] AS [column_name],  
  I.[type_desc], I.[is_unique], I.[data_space_id], I.[ignore_dup_key], I.[is_primary_key], 
  I.[is_unique_constraint], I.[fill_factor],    I.[is_padded], I.[is_disabled], I.[is_hypothetical], 
  I.[allow_row_locks], I.[allow_page_locks], IC.[is_descending_key], IC.[is_included_column] 
FROM sys.[tables] AS T  
  INNER JOIN sys.[indexes] I ON T.[object_id] = I.[object_id]  
  INNER JOIN sys.[index_columns] IC ON I.[object_id] = IC.[object_id] 
  INNER JOIN sys.[all_columns] AC ON T.[object_id] = AC.[object_id] AND IC.[column_id] = AC.[column_id] 
WHERE T.[is_ms_shipped] = 0 AND I.[type_desc] <> 'HEAP' 
ORDER BY T.[name], I.[index_id], IC.[key_ordinal]   
  • 3
    You need to also join on I.index_id = IC.index_id on the join to sys.index_columns – Chris J Dec 4 '13 at 16:00
  • FYI: Above query cartesians columns across indexes – Saxman Sep 19 at 20:05

Hey guys, I didn't go through but I got what I wanted in the query posted by the original author.

I used it (without conditions/filters) for my requirement but it gave incorrect results

The main problem was the results getting cross product without join condition on index_id

SELECT S.NAME SCHEMA_NAME,T.NAME TABLE_NAME,I.NAME INDEX_NAME,C.NAME COLUMN_NAME
  FROM SYS.TABLES T
       INNER JOIN SYS.SCHEMAS S
    ON T.SCHEMA_ID = S.SCHEMA_ID
       INNER JOIN SYS.INDEXES I
    ON I.OBJECT_ID = T.OBJECT_ID
       INNER JOIN SYS.INDEX_COLUMNS IC
    ON IC.OBJECT_ID = T.OBJECT_ID
       INNER JOIN SYS.COLUMNS C
    ON C.OBJECT_ID  = T.OBJECT_ID
   **AND IC.INDEX_ID    = I.INDEX_ID**
   AND IC.COLUMN_ID = C.COLUMN_ID
 WHERE 1=1

ORDER BY I.NAME,I.INDEX_ID,IC.KEY_ORDINAL

Following gives what is similar as sp_helpindex tablename

select T.name as TableName, I.name as IndexName, AC.Name as ColumnName, I.type_desc as IndexType 
from sys.tables as T inner join sys.indexes as I on T.[object_id] = I.[object_id] 
   inner join sys.index_columns as IC on IC.[object_id] = I.[object_id] and IC.[index_id] = I.[index_id] 
   inner join sys.all_columns as AC on IC.[object_id] = AC.[object_id] and IC.[column_id] = AC.[column_id] 
order by T.name, I.name

I have needed to get particular indexes, their index columns and their included columns as well. Here is the query I have used:

SELECT INX.[name] AS [Index Name]
      ,TBL.[name] AS [Table Name]
      ,DS1.[IndexColumnsNames]
      ,DS2.[IncludedColumnsNames]
FROM [sys].[indexes] INX
INNER JOIN [sys].[tables] TBL
    ON INX.[object_id] = TBL.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY 
(
    SELECT STUFF
    (
        (
            SELECT ' [' + CLS.[name] + ']'
            FROM [sys].[index_columns] INXCLS
            INNER JOIN [sys].[columns] CLS 
                ON INXCLS.[object_id] = CLS.[object_id] 
                AND INXCLS.[column_id] = CLS.[column_id]
            WHERE INX.[object_id] = INXCLS.[object_id] 
                AND INX.[index_id] = INXCLS.[index_id]
                AND INXCLS.[is_included_column] = 0
            FOR XML PATH('')
        )
        ,1
        ,1
        ,''
    ) 
) DS1 ([IndexColumnsNames])
CROSS APPLY 
(
    SELECT STUFF
    (
        (
            SELECT ' [' + CLS.[name] + ']'
            FROM [sys].[index_columns] INXCLS
            INNER JOIN [sys].[columns] CLS 
                ON INXCLS.[object_id] = CLS.[object_id] 
                AND INXCLS.[column_id] = CLS.[column_id]
            WHERE INX.[object_id] = INXCLS.[object_id] 
                AND INX.[index_id] = INXCLS.[index_id]
                AND INXCLS.[is_included_column] = 1
            FOR XML PATH('')
        )
        ,1
        ,1
        ,''
    ) 
) DS2 ([IncludedColumnsNames])
  • 1
    I have my original create statements and compared them to the output of this query.I can say that this is correctly placing the indexed and included columns, at least for my database. – bratak Jun 10 '15 at 21:50
  • This script worked for me too. I had an additional requirement to recreate the indices in an identical database elsewhere, so added this to the SELECT to generate the CREATE statements: ,CreateStatement = 'CREATE INDEX [' + INX.[name] + '] ON dbo.[' + TBL.[name] + '] (' + REPLACE(DS1.IndexColumnsNames, '] [', '], [') + ')' + CASE WHEN DS2.IncludedColumnsNames IS NOT NULL THEN ' INCLUDE (' + REPLACE(DS2.IncludedColumnsNames, '] [', '], [') + ')' ELSE '' END. – Gary Pendlebury Jul 25 at 14:38

this will work:

DECLARE @IndexInfo  TABLE (index_name         varchar(250)
                          ,index_description  varchar(250)
                          ,index_keys         varchar(250)
                          )

INSERT INTO @IndexInfo
exec sp_msforeachtable 'sp_helpindex ''?'''
select * from @IndexInfo

this does not reurn the table name and you will get warnings for all tables without an index, if that is a problem, you can create a loop over the tables that have indexes like this:

DECLARE @IndexInfoTemp  TABLE (index_name         varchar(250)
                              ,index_description  varchar(250)
                              ,index_keys         varchar(250)
                              )

DECLARE @IndexInfo  TABLE (table_name         sysname
                          ,index_name         varchar(250)
                          ,index_description  varchar(250)
                          ,index_keys         varchar(250)
                          )

DECLARE @Tables Table (RowID       int not null identity(1,1)
                      ,TableName   sysname 
                      )
DECLARE @MaxRow       int
DECLARE @CurrentRow   int
DECLARE @CurrentTable sysname

INSERT INTO @Tables
    SELECT
        DISTINCT t.name 
        FROM sys.indexes i
            INNER JOIN sys.tables t ON i.object_id = t.object_id
        WHERE i.Name IS NOT NULL
SELECT @MaxRow=@@ROWCOUNT,@CurrentRow=1

WHILE @CurrentRow<=@MaxRow
BEGIN

    SELECT @CurrentTable=TableName FROM @Tables WHERE RowID=@CurrentRow

    INSERT INTO @IndexInfoTemp
    exec sp_helpindex @CurrentTable

    INSERT INTO @IndexInfo
            (table_name   , index_name , index_description , index_keys)
        SELECT
            @CurrentTable , index_name , index_description , index_keys
        FROM @IndexInfoTemp

    DELETE FROM @IndexInfoTemp

    SET @CurrentRow=@CurrentRow+1

END --WHILE
SELECT * from @IndexInfo

EDIT
if you want, you can filter the data, here are some examples (these work for either method):

SELECT * FROM @IndexInfo WHERE index_description NOT LIKE '%primary key%'
SELECT * FROM @IndexInfo WHERE index_description NOT LIKE '%nonclustered%' AND index_description  LIKE '%clustered%'
SELECT * FROM @IndexInfo WHERE index_description LIKE '%unique%'
  • 1
    Unfortunately it doesn't list the include columns as part of the index definition. – Craig Nicholson Sep 16 '11 at 23:38
  • +1 for that. It is worth noting that SQL Server 2000 throws an "EXECUTE cannot be used as a source when inserting into a table variable." error for your code. Using a temporary table instead of a table variable resolves this easily. – Tomalak Dec 1 '11 at 16:36
with connect(schema_name,table_name,index_name,index_column_id,column_name) as
(   select s.name schema_name, t.name table_name, i.name index_name, index_column_id, cast(c.name as varchar(max)) column_name
 from sys.tables t
inner join sys.schemas s on t.schema_id = s.schema_id
inner join sys.indexes i on i.object_id = t.object_id
inner join sys.index_columns ic on ic.object_id = t.object_id and ic.index_id=i.index_id
        inner join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id and
                ic.column_id = c.column_id
                where index_column_id=1
union all
select s.name schema_name, t.name table_name, i.name index_name, ic.index_column_id, cast(connect.column_name + ',' + c.name as varchar(max)) column_name
 from sys.tables t
inner join sys.schemas s on t.schema_id = s.schema_id
inner join sys.indexes i on i.object_id = t.object_id
inner join sys.index_columns ic on ic.object_id = t.object_id and ic.index_id=i.index_id
        inner join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id and
                ic.column_id = c.column_id join connect on
connect.index_column_id+1 = ic.index_column_id
and connect.schema_name = s.name
and connect.table_name = t.name
and connect.index_name = i.name)
select connect.schema_name,connect.table_name,connect.index_name,connect.column_name
from connect join (select schema_name,table_name,index_name,MAX(index_column_id) index_column_id
from connect group by schema_name,table_name,index_name) mx
on connect.schema_name = mx.schema_name
and connect.table_name = mx.table_name
and connect.index_name = mx.index_name
and connect.index_column_id = mx.index_column_id
order by 1,2,3
  • This helped me as I was looking for tables, index_name and respective columns – Soman Dubey May 26 '16 at 12:03

The following works on SQL Server 2014/2016 as well as any Microsoft Azure SQL Database.

Produces a comprehensive result set that is easily exportable to Notepad/Excel for slicing and dicing and includes

  1. Table Name
  2. Index Name
  3. Index Description
  4. Indexed Columns - In order
  5. Included Columns - In order
 SELECT '[' + s.NAME + '].[' + o.NAME + ']' AS 'table_name'
    ,+ i.NAME AS 'index_name'
    ,LOWER(i.type_desc) + CASE 
        WHEN i.is_unique = 1
            THEN ', unique'
        ELSE ''
        END + CASE 
        WHEN i.is_primary_key = 1
            THEN ', primary key'
        ELSE ''
        END AS 'index_description'
    ,STUFF((
            SELECT ', [' + sc.NAME + ']' AS "text()"
            FROM syscolumns AS sc
            INNER JOIN sys.index_columns AS ic ON ic.object_id = sc.id
                AND ic.column_id = sc.colid
            WHERE sc.id = so.object_id
                AND ic.index_id = i1.indid
                AND ic.is_included_column = 0
            ORDER BY key_ordinal
            FOR XML PATH('')
            ), 1, 2, '') AS 'indexed_columns'
    ,STUFF((
            SELECT ', [' + sc.NAME + ']' AS "text()"
            FROM syscolumns AS sc
            INNER JOIN sys.index_columns AS ic ON ic.object_id = sc.id
                AND ic.column_id = sc.colid
            WHERE sc.id = so.object_id
                AND ic.index_id = i1.indid
                AND ic.is_included_column = 1
            FOR XML PATH('')
            ), 1, 2, '') AS 'included_columns'
FROM sysindexes AS i1
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i ON i.object_id = i1.id
    AND i.index_id = i1.indid
INNER JOIN sysobjects AS o ON o.id = i1.id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS so ON so.object_id = o.id
    AND is_ms_shipped = 0
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS s ON s.schema_id = so.schema_id
WHERE so.type = 'U'
    AND i1.indid < 255
    AND i1.STATUS & 64 = 0 --index with duplicates
    AND i1.STATUS & 8388608 = 0 --auto created index
    AND i1.STATUS & 16777216 = 0 --stats no recompute
    AND i.type_desc <> 'heap'
    AND so.NAME <> 'sysdiagrams'
ORDER BY table_name
    ,index_name;

Based on the accepted answer and two other questions 1, 2 I have assembled the following query:

SELECT
    QUOTENAME(t.name) AS TableName,
    QUOTENAME(i.name) AS IndexName,
    i.is_primary_key,
    i.is_unique,
    i.is_unique_constraint,
    STUFF(REPLACE(REPLACE((
        SELECT QUOTENAME(c.name) + CASE WHEN ic.is_descending_key = 1 THEN ' DESC' ELSE '' END AS [data()]
        FROM sys.index_columns AS ic
        INNER JOIN sys.columns AS c ON ic.object_id = c.object_id AND ic.column_id = c.column_id
        WHERE ic.object_id = i.object_id AND ic.index_id = i.index_id AND ic.is_included_column = 0
        ORDER BY ic.key_ordinal
        FOR XML PATH
    ), '<row>', ', '), '</row>', ''), 1, 2, '') AS KeyColumns,
    STUFF(REPLACE(REPLACE((
        SELECT QUOTENAME(c.name) AS [data()]
        FROM sys.index_columns AS ic
        INNER JOIN sys.columns AS c ON ic.object_id = c.object_id AND ic.column_id = c.column_id
        WHERE ic.object_id = i.object_id AND ic.index_id = i.index_id AND ic.is_included_column = 1
        ORDER BY ic.index_column_id
        FOR XML PATH
    ), '<row>', ', '), '</row>', ''), 1, 2, '') AS IncludedColumns,
    u.user_seeks,
    u.user_scans,
    u.user_lookups,
    u.user_updates
FROM sys.tables AS t
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i ON t.object_id = i.object_id
LEFT JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS u ON i.object_id = u.object_id AND i.index_id = u.index_id
WHERE t.is_ms_shipped = 0
AND i.type <> 0

This query returns results such as below which shows the list of indexes, their columns and usage. Very helpful in determining which index is performing better than others:

index list, columns and usage

This is a way of backing into the indexes. You can use SHOWCONTIG to assess fragmentation. It will list all of the indexes for the database or table, along with statistics. I would caution that on a large database, it can be long-running. For me, one of the benefits of this approach is that you don't have to be an admin to use it.

--Show fragmentation info on all indexes in a database

SET NOCOUNT ON
USE pubs
DBCC SHOWCONTIG WITH ALL_INDEXES
GO

...turn NOCOUNT back OFF when done

--Show fragmentation info on all indexes on a table

SET NOCOUNT ON
USE pubs
DBCC SHOWCONTIG (authors) WITH ALL_INDEXES
GO

--Show fragmentation information on a specific index

SET NOCOUNT ON
USE pubs
DBCC SHOWCONTIG (authors,aunmind)
GO
  • This will produce plain-text output, which is not an option for me: I need to import the result into a C# app, so parsing plaintext is the last thing I want to do. – Anton Gogolev Apr 19 '09 at 19:08
  • You're right, this isn't the solution for your situation. I'll be watching for the ultimate solution. You came up with a challenging and interesting question. – DOK Apr 19 '09 at 19:10

May I hazard another answer to this saturated question?

This is a liberal reworking of @marc_s answer, mixed with some stuff from @Tim Ford, with the goal of having a bit of a cleaner and simpler result set and final display and ordering for my current need.

SELECT 
    OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(t.[object_id],DB_ID()) AS [Schema],
    t.[name] AS [TableName], 
    ind.[name] AS [IndexName], 
    col.[name] AS [ColumnName],
    ic.column_id AS [ColumnId],
    ind.[type_desc] AS [IndexTypeDesc], 
    col.is_identity AS [IsIdentity],
    ind.[is_unique] AS [IsUnique],
    ind.[is_primary_key] AS [IsPrimaryKey],
    ic.[is_descending_key] AS [IsDescendingKey],
    ic.[is_included_column] AS [IsIncludedColumn]
FROM 
    sys.indexes ind 
INNER JOIN 
    sys.index_columns ic 
    ON ind.object_id = ic.object_id AND ind.index_id = ic.index_id 
INNER JOIN 
    sys.columns col 
    ON ic.object_id = col.object_id and ic.column_id = col.column_id 
INNER JOIN 
    sys.tables t 
    ON ind.object_id = t.object_id 
WHERE 
    t.is_ms_shipped = 0
    --ind.is_primary_key = 1 -- include or not pks, etc
    --AND ind.is_unique = 0
    --AND ind.is_unique_constraint = 0 
ORDER BY 
    [Schema],
    TableName, 
    IndexName,
    [ColumnId],
    ColumnName

based on Tim Ford code, this is the right answer:

  select tab.[name]  as [table_name],
         idx.[name]  as [index_name],
         allc.[name] as [column_name],
         idx.[type_desc],
         idx.[is_unique],
         idx.[data_space_id],
         idx.[ignore_dup_key],
         idx.[is_primary_key],
         idx.[is_unique_constraint],
         idx.[fill_factor],
         idx.[is_padded],
         idx.[is_disabled],
         idx.[is_hypothetical],
         idx.[allow_row_locks],
         idx.[allow_page_locks],
         idxc.[is_descending_key],
         idxc.[is_included_column],
         idxc.[index_column_id]

     from sys.[tables] as tab

    inner join sys.[indexes]       idx  on tab.[object_id] =  idx.[object_id]
    inner join sys.[index_columns] idxc on idx.[object_id] = idxc.[object_id] and  idx.[index_id]  = idxc.[index_id]
    inner join sys.[all_columns]   allc on tab.[object_id] = allc.[object_id] and idxc.[column_id] = allc.[column_id]

    where tab.[name] Like '%table_name%'
      and idx.[name] Like '%index_name%'
    order by tab.[name], idx.[index_id], idxc.[index_column_id]

I came up with this one, which is giving me the exact overview I need. What is helps is that you get one row per index into which the index columns are aggregated.

select 
    o.name as ObjectName, 
    i.name as IndexName, 
    i.is_primary_key as [PrimaryKey],
    SUBSTRING(i.[type_desc],0,6) as IndexType,
    i.is_unique as [Unique],
    Columns.[Normal] as IndexColumns,
    Columns.[Included] as IncludedColumns
from sys.indexes i 
join sys.objects o on i.object_id = o.object_id
cross apply
(
    select
        substring
        (
            (
                select ', ' + co.[name]
                from sys.index_columns ic
                join sys.columns co on co.object_id = i.object_id and co.column_id = ic.column_id
                where ic.object_id = i.object_id and ic.index_id = i.index_id and ic.is_included_column = 0
                order by ic.key_ordinal
                for xml path('')
            )
            , 3
            , 10000
        )    as [Normal]    
        , substring
        (
            (
                select ', ' + co.[name]
                from sys.index_columns ic
                join sys.columns co on co.object_id = i.object_id and co.column_id = ic.column_id
                where ic.object_id = i.object_id and ic.index_id = i.index_id and ic.is_included_column = 1
                order by ic.key_ordinal
                for xml path('')
            )
            , 3
            , 10000
        )    as [Included]    

) Columns
where o.[type] = 'U' --USER_TABLE
order by o.[name], i.[name], i.is_primary_key desc

Since your profile states that you are using .NET you could use Server Managed Objects (SMO) programmatically... otherwise any of the above answers are fantastic.

  • 1
    I personally find SMO to be terribly slow. – Anton Gogolev Jul 27 '09 at 12:13

The above solution is elegant, but according to MS, INDEXKEY_PROPERTY is being deprecated. See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186773.aspx

In Oracle

select CONNECYBY.SCHEMA_NAME,CONNECYBY.TABLE_NAME,CONNECYBY.INDEX_NAME,CONNECYBY.COLUMN_NAME
from (  select TABLE_OWNER SCHEMA_NAME,TABLE_NAME,INDEX_NAME,COLUMN_POSITION,trim(',' from sys_connect_by_path(COLUMN_NAME,',')) COLUMN_NAME
        from DBA_IND_COLUMNS
        start with COLUMN_POSITION = 1
        connect by TABLE_OWNER = prior TABLE_OWNER
        and TABLE_NAME = prior TABLE_NAME
        and INDEX_NAME = prior INDEX_NAME
        and COLUMN_POSITION = prior COLUMN_POSITION + 1) CONNECYBY
join (  select TABLE_OWNER SCHEMA_NAME,TABLE_NAME,INDEX_NAME,max(COLUMN_POSITION) COLUMN_POSITION
        from DBA_IND_COLUMNS
        group by TABLE_OWNER,TABLE_NAME,INDEX_NAME) MAX_CONNECYBY
on (    CONNECYBY.SCHEMA_NAME = MAX_CONNECYBY.SCHEMA_NAME
        and CONNECYBY.TABLE_NAME = MAX_CONNECYBY.TABLE_NAME
        and CONNECYBY.INDEX_NAME = MAX_CONNECYBY.INDEX_NAME
        and CONNECYBY.COLUMN_POSITION = MAX_CONNECYBY.COLUMN_POSITION)
order by CONNECYBY.SCHEMA_NAME,CONNECYBY.TABLE_NAME,CONNECYBY.INDEX_NAME

In SQL Server with

CONNECTBY(SCHEMA_NAME,TABLE_NAME,INDEX_NAME,INDEX_COLUMN_ID,COLUMN_NAME) 
as 
    (   select SCHEMAS.NAME SCHEMA_NAME
            , TABLES.NAME TABLE_NAME
            , INDEXES.NAME INDEX_NAME
            , INDEX_COLUMNS.INDEX_COLUMN_ID INDEX_COLUMN_ID
            , cast(COLUMNS.NAME AS VARCHAR(MAX)) COLUMN_NAME
        from SYS.INDEXES
        join SYS.TABLES on (INDEXES.OBJECT_ID = TABLES.OBJECT_ID)
        join SYS.SCHEMAS on (TABLES.SCHEMA_ID = SCHEMAS.SCHEMA_ID)
        join SYS.INDEX_COLUMNS on ( INDEXES.OBJECT_ID = INDEX_COLUMNS.OBJECT_ID 
                                    and INDEX_COLUMNS.INDEX_ID = INDEXES.INDEX_ID)
        join SYS.COLUMNS on (   INDEXES.OBJECT_ID = COLUMNS.OBJECT_ID 
                                and INDEX_COLUMNS.COLUMN_ID = COLUMNS.COLUMN_ID)
        where INDEX_COLUMNS.INDEX_COLUMN_ID = 1
        union all
        select SCHEMAS.NAME SCHEMA_NAME
            , TABLES.NAME TABLE_NAME
            , INDEXES.NAME INDEX_NAME
            , INDEX_COLUMNS.INDEX_COLUMN_ID INDEX_COLUMN_ID
            , cast(PRIOR.COLUMN_NAME + ',' + COLUMNS.NAME AS VARCHAR(MAX)) COLUMN_NAME
        from SYS.INDEXES
        join SYS.TABLES on (INDEXES.OBJECT_ID = TABLES.OBJECT_ID)
        join SYS.SCHEMAS on (TABLES.SCHEMA_ID = SCHEMAS.SCHEMA_ID)
        join SYS.INDEX_COLUMNS on ( INDEXES.OBJECT_ID = INDEX_COLUMNS.OBJECT_ID 
                                    and INDEX_COLUMNS.INDEX_ID = INDEXES.INDEX_ID)
        join SYS.COLUMNS on (   INDEXES.OBJECT_ID = COLUMNS.OBJECT_ID 
                                and INDEX_COLUMNS.COLUMN_ID = COLUMNS.COLUMN_ID)
        join CONNECTBY as PRIOR on (SCHEMAS.NAME = PRIOR.SCHEMA_NAME 
                                    and TABLES.NAME = PRIOR.TABLE_NAME 
                                    and INDEXES.NAME = PRIOR.INDEX_NAME 
                                    and INDEX_COLUMNS.INDEX_COLUMN_ID = PRIOR.INDEX_COLUMN_ID + 1))
select CONNECTBY.SCHEMA_NAME,CONNECTBY.TABLE_NAME,CONNECTBY.INDEX_NAME,CONNECTBY.COLUMN_NAME
from CONNECTBY
join (  select  SCHEMA_NAME
                , TABLE_NAME
                , INDEX_NAME
                , MAX(INDEX_COLUMN_ID) INDEX_COLUMN_ID
        from CONNECTBY 
        group by SCHEMA_NAME,TABLE_NAME,INDEX_NAME) MAX_CONNECTBY
        on (CONNECTBY.SCHEMA_NAME = MAX_CONNECTBY.SCHEMA_NAME
            and CONNECTBY.TABLE_NAME = MAX_CONNECTBY.TABLE_NAME
            and CONNECTBY.INDEX_NAME = MAX_CONNECTBY.INDEX_NAME
            and CONNECTBY.INDEX_COLUMN_ID = MAX_CONNECTBY.INDEX_COLUMN_ID)
order by CONNECTBY.SCHEMA_NAME,CONNECTBY.TABLE_NAME,CONNECTBY.INDEX_NAME

Just note that if you are going to use any of the above working queries to script your indexes, you need to incorporate filter_definition column from sys.indexes table in your queries to get the filter definition of non-clustered indexes in SQL 2008+

AM

First, please note that all the above queries may miss out or erroneously incorporate the INCLUDE columns of the indices. Also missing in some is the proper ordering and/or ASC/DESC option of the columns.

Modified the above query by jona. As an aside, in many of the database I use, I install my own CLR CONCATENATE aggregate function, so the code below depends on something like this being present. The above SQL statements reduce to a much more maintainable:

SELECT
  s.[name] AS [schema_name]
, t.[name] AS [table_name]
, i.[name] AS [index_name]
, dbo.Concatenate(CASE WHEN ic.[key_ordinal] > 0 AND ic.[is_descending_key] = 1 THEN c.[name] + ' DESC' WHEN key_ordinal > 0 THEN c.[name] ELSE NULL END,',',1) AS [columns]
, dbo.Concatenate(CASE WHEN ic.[is_included_column] = 1 THEN c.[name] ELSE NULL END,',',1) AS [includes]
FROM
  sys.tables t
INNER JOIN
  sys.schemas s ON t.[schema_id] = s.[schema_id]
INNER JOIN
  sys.indexes i ON i.[object_id] = t.[object_id]
INNER JOIN
  sys.index_columns ic ON ic.[object_id] = t.[object_id] AND ic.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN
  sys.columns c ON c.[object_id] = t.[object_id] AND ic.column_id = c.column_id
GROUP BY
  s.[name]
, t.[name]
, i.[name]
ORDER BY
  s.[name]
, t.[name]
, i.[name]

There are lots of concatenation aggregates out there if your environment allows CLR-based functions added to it.

For unique columns per index:

select s.name, t.name, i.name, i.index_id,c.name,c.column_id
 from sys.schemas s
inner join sys.tables t on t.schema_id = s.schema_id
inner join sys.indexes i on i.object_id = t.object_id
inner join sys.index_columns ic on ic.object_id = t.object_id
    and ic.index_id=i.index_id
inner join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id 
    and ic.column_id = c.column_id
where i.object_id = object_id('previous.account_1')  
order by index_id,column_id

The query below includes all of the pertinent information for the user-defined indexes, (no indexes for unique constraints & primary keys) with all columns:

SELECT I.name as IndexName, 
        CASE WHEN I.is_unique = 1 THEN 'Yes' ELSE 'No' END as 'Unique',
        I.type_desc COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT as Index_Type,
        '[' + SCHEMA_NAME(T.schema_id) + ']' as 'Schema',
        '[' + T.name + ']' as TableName,
        STUFF((SELECT ', [' + C.name + CASE WHEN IC.is_descending_key = 0 THEN '] ASC' ELSE '] DESC' END
            FROM sys.index_columns IC INNER JOIN sys.columns C ON  IC.object_id = C.object_id  AND IC.column_id = C.column_id
            WHERE IC.is_included_column = 0 AND IC.object_id = I.object_id AND IC.index_id = I.Index_id
            FOR XML PATH('')), 1, 2, '') as Key_Columns,
        Included_Columns, 
        I.filter_definition,
        CASE WHEN I.is_padded = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END as PAD_INDEX, 
        CASE WHEN ST.no_recompute = 0 THEN 'OFF' ELSE 'ON' END as [Statistics_Norecompute],
        CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), CASE WHEN I.fill_factor = 0 THEN 100 ELSE I.fill_factor END) as [Fillfactor],
        CASE WHEN I.ignore_dup_key = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END as [Ignore_Dup_Key],       
        CASE WHEN I.allow_row_locks = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END as [Allow_Row_Locks], 
        CASE WHEN I.allow_page_locks = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END [Allow_Page_Locks]        
FROM    sys.indexes I INNER JOIN        
        sys.tables T ON  T.object_id = I.object_id INNER JOIN       
        sys.stats ST ON  ST.object_id = I.object_id AND ST.stats_id = I.index_id INNER JOIN 
        sys.data_spaces DS ON  I.data_space_id = DS.data_space_id INNER JOIN 
        sys.filegroups FG ON  I.data_space_id = FG.data_space_id LEFT OUTER JOIN 
        (SELECT * FROM 
            (SELECT IC2.object_id, IC2.index_id,
                STUFF((SELECT ', ' + C.name FROM sys.index_columns IC1 INNER JOIN 
                    sys.columns C ON C.object_id = IC1.object_id
                        AND C.column_id = IC1.column_id
                        AND IC1.is_included_column = 1
                    WHERE  IC1.object_id = IC2.object_id AND IC1.index_id = IC2.index_id
                    GROUP BY IC1.object_id, C.name, index_id  FOR XML PATH('')
                ), 1, 2, '') as Included_Columns
            FROM sys.index_columns IC2
            GROUP BY IC2.object_id, IC2.index_id) tmp1
            WHERE Included_Columns IS NOT NULL
        ) tmp2
        ON tmp2.object_id = I.object_id AND tmp2.index_id = I.index_id
WHERE I.is_primary_key = 0 AND I.is_unique_constraint = 0;

As an added bonus, the below query is formatted to write out the create index and drop index scripts:

SELECT I.name as IndexName, 
        -- Uncommnent line below to include checking for index exists as part of the script
        --'IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT name FROM sysindexes WHERE name = '''+ I.name +''') ' +
        'CREATE ' + CASE WHEN I.is_unique = 1 THEN ' UNIQUE ' ELSE '' END +
        I.type_desc COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT + ' INDEX [' +
        I.name + '] ON [' + SCHEMA_NAME(T.schema_id) + '].[' + T.name + '] (' + STUFF(
        (SELECT ', [' + C.name + CASE WHEN IC.is_descending_key = 0 THEN '] ASC' ELSE '] DESC' END
            FROM sys.index_columns IC INNER JOIN sys.columns C ON  IC.object_id = C.object_id  AND IC.column_id = C.column_id
            WHERE IC.is_included_column = 0 AND IC.object_id = I.object_id AND IC.index_id = I.Index_id
            FOR XML PATH('')), 1, 2, '')  + ') ' +
        ISNULL(' INCLUDE (' + IncludedColumns + ') ', '') +
        ISNULL(' WHERE ' + I.filter_definition, '') + 
        'WITH (PAD_INDEX = ' + CASE WHEN I.is_padded = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END + 
        ', STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = ' + CASE WHEN ST.no_recompute = 0 THEN 'OFF' ELSE 'ON' END + 
        ', SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF' + 
        ', FILLFACTOR = ' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), CASE WHEN I.fill_factor = 0 THEN 100 ELSE I.fill_factor END) +
        ', IGNORE_DUP_KEY = ' + CASE WHEN I.ignore_dup_key = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END +      
        ', ONLINE = OFF' + 
        ', ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ' + CASE WHEN I.allow_row_locks = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END + 
        ', ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ' + CASE WHEN I.allow_page_locks = 1 THEN 'ON' ELSE 'OFF' END + 
        ') ON [' + DS.name + '];' + CHAR(13) + CHAR(10) + 'GO' as [CreateIndex],
        'DROP INDEX ['+ I.name +'] ON ['+ SCHEMA_NAME(T.schema_id) +'].['+ T.name +'];' +
        CHAR(13) + CHAR(10) + 'GO' AS [DropIndex]
FROM    sys.indexes I INNER JOIN        
        sys.tables T ON  T.object_id = I.object_id INNER JOIN       
        sys.stats ST ON  ST.object_id = I.object_id AND ST.stats_id = I.index_id INNER JOIN 
        sys.data_spaces DS ON  I.data_space_id = DS.data_space_id INNER JOIN 
        sys.filegroups FG ON  I.data_space_id = FG.data_space_id LEFT OUTER JOIN 
        (SELECT * FROM 
            (SELECT IC2.object_id, IC2.index_id,
                STUFF((SELECT ', ' + C.name FROM sys.index_columns IC1 INNER JOIN 
                    sys.columns C ON C.object_id = IC1.object_id
                        AND C.column_id = IC1.column_id
                        AND IC1.is_included_column = 1
                    WHERE  IC1.object_id = IC2.object_id AND IC1.index_id = IC2.index_id
                    GROUP BY IC1.object_id, C.name, index_id  FOR XML PATH('')
                ), 1, 2, '') as IncludedColumns
            FROM sys.index_columns IC2
            GROUP BY IC2.object_id, IC2.index_id) tmp1
            WHERE IncludedColumns IS NOT NULL
        ) tmp2
        ON tmp2.object_id = I.object_id AND tmp2.index_id = I.index_id
WHERE I.is_primary_key = 0 AND I.is_unique_constraint = 0 

Here is the best way to do it:

SELECT sys.tables.object_id, sys.tables.name as table_name, sys.columns.name as column_name, sys.indexes.name as index_name,
sys.indexes.is_unique, sys.indexes.is_primary_key 
FROM sys.tables, sys.indexes, sys.index_columns, sys.columns 
WHERE (sys.tables.object_id = sys.indexes.object_id AND sys.tables.object_id = sys.index_columns.object_id AND sys.tables.object_id = sys.columns.object_id
AND sys.indexes.index_id = sys.index_columns.index_id AND sys.index_columns.column_id = sys.columns.column_id) 
AND sys.tables.name = 'your_table_name'

I prefer using implicit joins as it's much easier for me to understand. You can remove the object_id reference as you might not need it.

Cheers.

Using SQL Server 2016, this gives a complete list of all indexes, with an included dump of each table so you can see how the tables relate. It also shows columns included in covering indexes:

select t.name TableName, i.name IdxName, c.name ColName
    , ic.index_column_id ColPosition
    , i.type_desc Type
    , case when i.is_primary_key = 1 then 'Yes' else '' end [Primary?]
    , case when i.is_unique = 1 then 'Yes' else '' end [Unique?]
    , case when ic.is_included_column = 0 then '' else 'Yes - Included' end [CoveredColumn?]
    , 'indexes >>>>' [*indexes*], i.*, 'index_columns >>>>' [*index_columns*]
    , ic.*, 'tables >>>>' [*tables*]
    , t.*, 'columns >>>>' [*columns*], c.*
from sys.index_columns ic
join sys.tables t on t.object_id = ic.object_id
join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id and c.column_id = ic.column_id
join sys.indexes i on i.object_id = t.object_id and i.index_id = ic.index_id
order by TableName, IdxName, ColPosition

I have used the following query when I had this requirement...

SELECT 
    TableName = t.name,
    ColumnId = col.column_id, 
    ColumnName = col.name,
    DataType = ty.name,
    MaxSize = ty.max_length,
    IsNullable = CASE WHEN (col.is_nullable = 1) THEN 'Y' END,
    IsIdentity = CASE WHEN (col.is_identity = 1) THEN 'Y' END,
    IsPrimaryKey = CASE WHEN (ic.column_id = col.column_id) THEN 'Y' END,
    IsForeignKey = CASE WHEN (fkc.parent_column_id = col.column_id) THEN 'Y' END,
    IsDefault = CASE WHEN (dc.parent_column_id = col.column_id) THEN 'Y' END
FROM 
    sys.tables t
INNER JOIN 
     sys.columns col ON t.object_id = col.object_id 
LEFT JOIN
    sys.indexes ind ON t.object_id = ind.object_id 
LEFT JOIN 
     sys.index_columns ic ON ic.index_id=ind.index_id AND ic.object_id = col.object_id and ic.column_id = col.column_id
LEFT JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns fkc
                ON fkc.parent_object_id = col.object_id AND fkc.parent_column_id=col.column_id
LEFT JOIN sys.default_constraints dc
                ON dc.parent_object_id = col.object_id AND dc.parent_column_id=col.column_id
LEFT JOIN
     sys.types ty on ty.user_type_id = col.user_type_id

WHERE
    --t.name='<TABLENAME>'
    t.schema_id = 10    --SCHEMA ID
    AND ind.is_primary_key=1    
ORDER BY
    t.name, ColumnId
sELECT 
     TableName = t.name,
     IndexName = ind.name,
     --IndexId = ind.index_id,
     ColumnId = ic.index_column_id,
     ColumnName = col.name,
     key_ordinal,
     ind.type_desc
     --ind.*,
     --ic.*,
     --col.* 
FROM 
     sys.indexes ind 
INNER JOIN 
     sys.index_columns ic ON  ind.object_id = ic.object_id and ind.index_id = ic.index_id 
INNER JOIN 
     sys.columns col ON ic.object_id = col.object_id and ic.column_id = col.column_id 
INNER JOIN 
     sys.tables t ON ind.object_id = t.object_id 
WHERE 
     ind.is_primary_key = 0 
     AND ind.is_unique = 0 
     AND ind.is_unique_constraint = 0 
     AND t.is_ms_shipped = 0 
     and t.name='CompanyReconciliation' --table name
     and key_ordinal>0
ORDER BY 
     t.name, ind.name, ind.index_id, ic.index_column_id 
  • 1
    Vinod, it is a little hard to read unformatted code. If you examine the code in the other answers, you can see that it it much more readable. To get the precode format, click on edit, then choose the code sample icon {}. Then you still might need to tweak the alignment. Don't be discouraged. Everyone learns their way here, and you do have something to contribute. – DOK Dec 20 '16 at 6:00

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