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In attempting to create an initial, failing unit test in Visual Studio Professonal 2008's test capabilities, I can't seem to get Assert.ReferenceEquals() to correctly fail when an object instance is not equal to a null reference. Note that object.ReferenceEquals() is correctly returning false for this same comparison.

Here is my class code:

public static class Project
{
    public static object TheObject { get; set; }

    public static void Startup(object theObject)
    {
        // ToDo: Project.Startup(): Test.
        // ToDo: Project.Startup(): Implement.
    }
}

And then here are the key aspects of my test class:

[TestClass()]
public class ProjectTest
{
    [TestMethod()]
    public void StartupTest()
    {
        object obj = "hello";
        Project.Startup(obj);    
        Assert.ReferenceEquals(obj, Project.TheObject); // Test Passes!?!
    }
}

Note that the static void Startup(object) method is empty, so the static object TheObject property is never set and remains null. So, clearly, Assert.ReferenceEquals(obj, Project.TheObject) should fail, but somehow this test passes.

Note that changing

Assert.ReferenceEquals(obj, Project.TheObject)

to

Assert.IsTrue(object.ReferenceEquals(obj, Project.TheObject))

causes this test to correctly fail.

This seems too simple, and yet I cannot see what's going wrong here. If someone can point out the error in my ways, I would be much obliged.

Thanks in advance,

Mike

Update Answered by James Avery:

Ah, an how silly I feel now. I knew it had to be something like this. Wow.

Sure enough, 'GoToDefinition' takes me to 'Object.ReferenceEquals()'. So typing "Assert.ReferenceEquals()" is really System.Object.ReferenceEquals(), which in my case was quietly returning 'false'. This, of course, has nothing to do with actually failing an assertion, so the test passes. Amazing.

Thanks James.

  • I just got hit with this same silly mistake. It's such an easy trap to fall into. It seems like the unit test classes could at least throw up a warning if no actual Assertions were called. That would at least catch the very simple cases like your sample code above and the particular property check I was trying to accomplish. – Sam Skuce Feb 9 '11 at 17:30
  • "It seems like the unit test classes could at least throw up a warning if no actual Assertions were called." <-- That's a pretty interesting idea and not just to protect against this silly trap. I like it. – Mike Rosenblum Feb 11 '11 at 2:00
  • 2
    A better idea, though, would be for the Assert class to create a new static method called 'ReferenceEquals' that would shadow the 'Object.ReferenceEquals' method and then mark that method with the ObsoleteAttribute with an appropropriate error message. This way the user would be warned if they made this mistake. – Mike Rosenblum Feb 11 '11 at 2:02
34

The ReferenceEquals method you are calling is the static method available on all reference objects, it is not part of the testing framework. If you look it is returning a boolean value whereas a normal assertion would be void. This is definitely confusing, .AreSame() is the assertion you are looking for.

  • 1
    Ah, an how silly I feel now. I knew it had to be something like this. Wow. Sure enough, 'GoToDefinition' takes me to 'Object.ReferenceEquals()'. So typing "Assert.ReferenceEquals()" is really Object.ReferenceEquals(), which in my case was quietly returning 'false' -- which, of course, has nothing to do with actually failing an assertion. So the test passes. Amazing. Thanks James. – Mike Rosenblum Apr 20 '09 at 0:16
  • 1
    I ran in to similar problem and NUnit throws an exception indicating not to use ReferenceEquals for assertions. I changed it to Assert.AreSame() as you suggested. They obviously overrode Assert.ReferenceEquals() to throw an exception, but why not override the function to do what we expect? – Stealth Rabbi Oct 24 '11 at 11:37

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