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I found this example in MDN about .reduce() method. what does currentValue,initialValue do/mean here?

const array1 = [1, 2, 3, 4];

// 0 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4
const initialValue = 0;
const sumWithInitial = array1.reduce(
  (accumulator, currentValue) => accumulator + currentValue,
  initialValue /
```//what does currentValue,initialValue do . I would understand if it had accumulator+currentValue. But what does the comma ,initialValue do/ mean here? I've never seen a+b,c. I don't know what b,c would do in this case.
);

`console.log(sumWithInitial);
`// Expected output: 10

I try reading the MDN documentation to understand more things , but I couldn't understand that part. 
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  • It's shorthand for array1.reduce((accumulator, currentValue) => { return accumulator + currentValue; }, initialValue);. The symbol => is a "fat arrow" function, where you don't need return nor wrapping { }. So currentValue,initialValue isn't one thing, currentValue is the end of the function definition, then initialValue is the second argument passed to reduce().
    – Andy Ray
    Commented Jul 18, 2023 at 23:39
  • The , in b,c is a comma that separates the first argument of the .reduce() method, that being the arrow function (accumulator, currentValue) => accumulator + currentValue in your case, and the second argument, which is initialValue Commented Jul 18, 2023 at 23:39

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