14

For example I have some random string:

str = "26723462345"

And I want to split it in 2 parts after 6-th char. How to do this correctly?

Thank you!

33

This should do it

[str[0..5], str[6..-1]]

or

 [str.slice(0..5), str.slice(6..-1)]

Really should check out http://corelib.rubyonrails.org/classes/String.html

  • 2
    or str[0...6] and you write everywhere the key value "6" – tokland Oct 6 '11 at 9:52
12

Here’s on option. Be aware, however, that it will mutate your original string:

part1, part2 = str.slice!(0...6), str

p part1  # => "267234"
p part2  # => "62345"
p str    # => "62345"

Update

In the years since I wrote this answer I’ve come to agree with the commenters complaining that it might be excessively clever. Below are a few other options that don’t mutate the original string.

Caveat: This one will only work with ASCII characters.

str.unpack("a6a*")
# => ["267234", "62345"]

The next one uses the magic variable $', which returns the part of the string after the most recent Regexp match:

part1, part2 = str[/.{6}/], $'
p [part1, part2]
# => ["267234", "62345"]

And this last one uses a lookbehind to split the string in the right place without returning any extra parts:

p str.split(/(?<=^.{6})/)
# => ["267234", "62345"]
  • 1
    I like this better than mine. Although I'd add str = part1 + part2 at end so string doesn't change. – Yule Oct 6 '11 at 10:33
  • Well if you want to keep str unchanged then your solution is better I think. – Jordan Running Oct 6 '11 at 10:34
  • What about: str, part1, part2 = str.clone, str.slice!(0..6), str – Yule Oct 6 '11 at 12:24
  • 3
    I won't go as far to say that functional style is always better than imperative style, but IMHO this inplace change is just too clever to be advisable. – tokland May 5 '12 at 22:53
4
_, part1, part2 = str.partition /.{6}/

https://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/String.html#method-i-partition

  • 2
    Nice. Bonus: you can split so that the last part is always 6 chars like this: part1, part2, _ = str.partition /.{6}$/ – Mladen Jablanović Jul 25 '18 at 14:18
3

The best way IMO is string.scan(/.{6}/)

irb(main)> str
=> "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
irb(main)> str.scan(/.{13}/)
=> ["abcdefghijklm", "nopqrstuvwxyz"]
  • str.scan(/.{6}/) on OP's example returns only the first part. – Mladen Jablanović Jul 25 '18 at 14:16
1

As a fun answer, how about:

str.split(/(^.{1,6})/)[1..-1]

This works because split returns the capture group matches, in addition to the parts of the string before and after the regular expression.

0

Here's a reusable version for you:

str       = "26723462345"
n         = str.length
boundary  = 6
head      = str.slice(0, boundary) # => "267234" 
tail      = str.slice(boundary, n) # => "62345" 

It also preserves the original string, which may come in handy later in the program.

  • You can use -1 instead of having to get the string's length. – Nic Hartley Sep 25 '16 at 0:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.