1

This question is the exact reverse of converting a ReadableStream into a ReadStream.

With the advent of non-Node.js runtimes such as Deno or the "Edge runtime" in Next.js, it can be useful to convert a Node.js specific ReadStream into a generic ReadableStream.

This is for instance useful to send files from a Next.js route handler, see this discussion on Next.js GitHub.

I've drafted a piece of code like so:

const downloadStream = fs.createReadStream(zipFilePath);
    const readStream = new ReadableStream({
      start(controller) {
        return pump();
        function pump() {
          return downloadStream.read().then(({ done, value }) => {
            // When no more data needs to be consumed, close the stream
            if (done) {
              controller.close();
              return;
            }
            // Enqueue the next data chunk into our target stream
            controller.enqueue(value);
            return pump();
          });
        }
      },
    });

I am in the process of testing it.

Edit: the problem with this first draft is that stream.Readable read() method doesn't return a promise, as mentioned by @Mahesh in the comments.

Here is a second try:

    const downloadStream = fs.createReadStream(zipFilePath);
    const readStream = new ReadableStream({
      start(controller) {
        return pump();
        function pump() {
          const buf = downloadStream.read() as Buffer
          if (buf === null) {
            controller.close();
            return;
          }
          controller.enqueue(buf.toString());
          return pump();
        }
      },
    });

It gives me a null buffer immediately despite the file weighing 344 bytes. When I call isPaused(), the stream doesn't seem to be paused. Calling pause() doesn't fix my issue, neither adding an explicit size of 1 byte to read().

I also get a weird error from Next.js:

- error Error: aborted
    at connResetException (node:internal/errors:711:14)
    at Socket.socketCloseListener (node:_http_client:454:19)
    at Socket.emit (node:events:525:35)
    at TCP.<anonymous> (node:net:313:12) {
  code: 'ECONNRESET'
}

Are there simpler solutions, syntax-wise?

2
  • 1
    Its been long but I think the Node.js ReadableStream read method does not return a Promise, but the chunk of data directly. To get chunks of data asynchronously, you can use the readable event and the read method in combination
    – Mahesh
    Jul 25, 2023 at 13:13
  • You are right, my current code doesn't do anything because of this. I am trying to figure the right syntax. Some insights: it seem all stream start in "paused mode", in this mode I can call "read()" and check if the response is null or not to see if there is more data. Docs are here: nodejs.org/api/stream.html#class-streamreadable
    – Eric Burel
    Jul 25, 2023 at 13:34

1 Answer 1

2

Managed to find a working syntax but still lacking some details.

  1. We want to be able to read a file using an imperative syntax, instead of relying on the traditional "data" event.
/**
 * From https://github.com/MattMorgis/async-stream-generator
 */
async function* nodeStreamToIterator(stream) {
    for await (const chunk of stream) {
        yield chunk;
    }
}

I am not familiar with generators so I am not sure of:

  • why we can apply the "of" operator to a Node.js ReadableStream?
  • what for await means here?

But at least this syntax let's us consume the stream in loops.

  1. Now we want to convert the iterator into a web platform ReadStream.
/**
 * Taken from Next.js doc
 * https://nextjs.org/docs/app/building-your-application/routing/router-handlers#streaming
 * Itself taken from mozilla doc
 * https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/ReadableStream#convert_async_iterator_to_stream
 * @param {*} iterator 
 * @returns {ReadableStream}
 */
function iteratorToStream(iterator) {
    return new ReadableStream({
        async pull(controller) {
            const { value, done } = await iterator.next()

            if (done) {
                controller.close()
            } else {

                controller.enqueue(new Uint8Array(value))
            }
        },
    })
}

Notice the "Uint8Array": this doesn't seem to be needed in all scenarios, but encoding may be required on some platforms, I needed this conversion in Next.js. See this discussion on Next.js github.

Finally we can use this stream in a Response just to see how it works:

// highWaterMark affects the chunk size, here I use a small size to simulate many chunks
const nodeStream = fs.createReadStream("./.gitignore", { highWaterMark: 8 })
const iterator = nodeStreamToIterator(nodeStream)
const webStream = iteratorToStream(iterator)

const res = new Response(webStream)
const blob = await res.blob()
console.log(await blob.text())
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  • 2
    In short, for..of construction can be applied to any object that has iterator and for await..of respectively can be applied to any async iterator. Streams are compatible with async iterators that's why you can use for await.
    – Jaood_xD
    Jul 27, 2023 at 14:06

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