109

Why is the following algorithm not halting for me? (str is the string I am searching in, findStr is the string I am trying to find)

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
int lastIndex = 0;
int count = 0;

while (lastIndex != -1) {
    lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr,lastIndex);

    if( lastIndex != -1)
        count++;

    lastIndex += findStr.length();
}

System.out.println(count);
  • 4
    We did a really good one in Udacity: we used newSTR = str.replace(findStr, ""); and returned count = ((str.length() - newSTR.length())/findStr.length()); – SolarLunix Sep 14 '15 at 17:46
  • Similar question for characters: stackoverflow.com/q/275944/873282 – koppor Apr 16 '17 at 19:42
  • Don't you also want to account for the case where the prefix of the search string is its suffix? In that case I don't think any of the suggested answers would work. here is an example. In that case you would need a more elaborate algorithm, like the Knuth Morris Pratt(KMP) which is coded up in the CLRS book – Sid Jul 25 '17 at 15:42
  • it is not halting for you, because after reaching your 'halt' condition (lastIndex == -1) you reset it by incrementing the value of lastIndex (lastIndex += findStr.length();) – Legna Aug 1 '17 at 22:30

24 Answers 24

80

The last line was creating a problem. lastIndex would never be at -1, so there would be an infinite loop. This can be fixed by moving the last line of code into the if block.

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
int lastIndex = 0;
int count = 0;

while(lastIndex != -1){

    lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr,lastIndex);

    if(lastIndex != -1){
        count ++;
        lastIndex += findStr.length();
    }
}
System.out.println(count);
  • 101
    This reply is the exact copy of the post I made an hour before ;) – Olivier Apr 20 '09 at 14:16
  • 7
    Note that this might or might not return the result expected. With substring "aa" and string to search "aaa" the number of occurences expected may be one (returned by this code), but may be two as well (in this case you'll need "lastIndex++" instead of "lastIndex += findStr.length()") depending on what you are looking for. – Stanislav Kniazev Apr 23 '09 at 12:52
  • 1
    When are people going to learn to wrap stuff like this in a copy and paste static method? See my answer below, it's also more optimized. – momomo Apr 12 '15 at 9:54
  • 2
    the code has really been breached – Hendra Anggrian May 16 '17 at 16:00
  • 1
    The moral here is that if you're intending to write an answer, check first whether or not someone else has already written the exact same answer. There's really no benefit in having the same answer appear twice, regardless of whether your answer was copied, or written independently. – Dawood ibn Kareem Jul 11 '18 at 4:03
175

How about using StringUtils.countMatches from Apache Commons Lang?

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";

System.out.println(StringUtils.countMatches(str, findStr));

That outputs:

3
  • 7
    No matter how right this suggestion is , it cannot be accepted as the solution as it is not answering OP's question – kommradHomer Jul 12 '14 at 11:36
  • 3
    Is this deprecated or something .. my IDE is not recognising – Vamsi Pavan Mahesh Jul 18 '14 at 16:30
  • @VamsiPavanMahesh StringUtils is a library of Apache Commons. Check here : commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-2.6/org/… – Anup Sep 15 '15 at 11:33
  • This answer is a copy of Peter Lawrey's answer a day earlier (see below). – Zon Mar 14 '16 at 14:36
  • StringUtils hasn't countMatches method. – plaidshirt May 10 '18 at 9:19
109

Your lastIndex += findStr.length(); was placed outside the brackets, causing an infinite loop (when no occurence was found, lastIndex was always to findStr.length()).

Here is the fixed version :

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
int lastIndex = 0;
int count = 0;

while (lastIndex != -1) {

    lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr, lastIndex);

    if (lastIndex != -1) {
        count++;
        lastIndex += findStr.length();
    }
}
System.out.println(count);
83

A shorter version. ;)

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
System.out.println(str.split(findStr, -1).length-1);
  • 7
    return haystack.split(Pattern.quote(needle), -1).length - 1; if for instance needle=":)" – Mr_and_Mrs_D Dec 16 '12 at 16:01
  • 2
    @lOranger Without the ,-1 it will drop trailing matches. – Peter Lawrey Dec 28 '12 at 12:02
  • 3
    Ouch, thanks, good to know! This will teach me to read the small lines in the javadoc... – Laurent Grégoire Dec 28 '12 at 12:05
  • 4
    Nice! But it includes only non-overlapping matches, no? E.g. matching "aa" in "aaa" will return 1, not 2? Of course including overlapping or non-overlapping matches are both valid and dependent on user requirements (perhaps a flag to indicate count overlaps, yes/no)? – Cornel Masson Apr 26 '13 at 9:24
  • 2
    -1 .. try running this on "aaaa" and "aa".. the correct answer is 3 not 2. – Kalyanaraman Santhanam Sep 15 '14 at 6:06
78

Do you really have to handle the matching yourself ? Especially if all you need is the number of occurences, regular expressions are tidier :

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("hello");
Matcher m = p.matcher(str);
int count = 0;
while (m.find()){
    count +=1;
}
System.out.println(count);     
  • 1
    This does NOT find special characters, it will find 0 count for strings below: String str = "hel+loslkhel+lodjladfjhel+lo"; Pattern p = Pattern.compile("hel+lo"); – Ben Feb 2 '14 at 4:09
  • 13
    yes it will if you express your regex correctly. try with Pattern.compile("hel\\+lo"); the + sign has a special meaning in a regex and needs to be escaped. – Jean Feb 2 '14 at 9:42
  • 4
    If what you are looking for is to take an arbitrary String and use it as an exact match with all special regular expression characters ignored, Pattern.quote(str) is your friend! – Mike Furtak Jan 10 '15 at 18:11
  • 2
    this does not work for "aaa" when str = "aaaaaa". There are 4 answer but yours giving 2 – Pujan Srivastava Oct 29 '16 at 12:02
  • This solution doesn't work for this case: str = "This is a test \\n\\r string", subStr = "\\r", it shows 0 occurrences. – Maksym Ovsianikov Dec 1 '17 at 23:21
9

Here it is, wrapped up in a nice and reusable method:

public static int count(String text, String find) {
        int index = 0, count = 0, length = find.length();
        while( (index = text.indexOf(find, index)) != -1 ) {                
                index += length; count++;
        }
        return count;
}
8
String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
int lastIndex = 0;
int count = 0;

while((lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr, lastIndex)) != -1) {
     count++;
     lastIndex += findStr.length() - 1;
}
System.out.println(count);

at the end of the loop count is 3; hope it helps

  • 1
    Best example here. – marcolopes May 30 '11 at 18:44
  • 5
    The code contains an error. If we search for a single character, the findStr.length() - 1 returns 0 and we are in an endless cycle. – Jan Bodnar Sep 26 '14 at 10:58
6
public int countOfOccurrences(String str, String subStr) {
  return (str.length() - str.replaceAll(Pattern.quote(subStr), "").length()) / subStr.length();
}
  • Good answer. Can you mind adding some notes on how does it work? – santhosh kumar Sep 27 '17 at 20:07
  • Sure, str - is our source string, subStr - is a substring. The goal is to calculate amount of occurrences of subStr in str. To do this, we use the formula: (a-b)/c, where a - length of str, b - length of str without all occurrences of subStr (we remove all occurrences of subStr from str for this), c - length of subStr. So, basically we extract from the length of str - length of str without all subStr, and then we divide result on the length of subStr. Please let me know if you have any other questions. – Maksym Ovsianikov Oct 17 '17 at 0:35
  • much thanks Maksym. – santhosh kumar Oct 17 '17 at 2:01
  • Santhosh, you are welcome! The important part is to use Pattern.quote for subStr, otherwise in may fail in some cases, like this one: str = "This is a test \\n\\r string", subStr = "\\r". Some similar answers provided here don't use Pattern, so they will fail in such cases. – Maksym Ovsianikov Dec 1 '17 at 23:17
5

A lot of the given answers fail on one or more of:

  • Patterns of arbitrary length
  • Overlapping matches (such as counting "232" in "23232" or "aa" in "aaa")
  • Regular expression meta-characters

Here's what I wrote:

static int countMatches(Pattern pattern, String string)
{
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(string);

    int count = 0;
    int pos = 0;
    while (matcher.find(pos))
    {
        count++;
        pos = matcher.start() + 1;
    }

    return count;
}

Example call:

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("232");
int count = countMatches(pattern, "23232"); // Returns 2

If you want a non-regular-expression search, just compile your pattern appropriately with the LITERAL flag:

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("1+1", Pattern.LITERAL);
int count = countMatches(pattern, "1+1+1"); // Returns 2
  • Yes... surprised there isn't something like this in Apache StringUtils. – mike rodent Jan 22 '17 at 11:53
4

I'm very surprised no one has mentioned this one liner. It's simple, concise and performs slightly better than str.split(target, -1).length-1

public static int count(String str, String target) {
    return (str.length() - str.replace(target, "").length()) / target.length();
}
3

Increment lastIndex whenever you look for next occurrence.

Otherwise it's always finding the first substring (at position 0).

3
public int indexOf(int ch,
                   int fromIndex)

Returns the index within this string of the first occurrence of the specified character, starting the search at the specified index.

So your lastindex value is always 0 and it always finds hello in the string.

2

The answer given as correct is no good for counting things like line returns and is far too verbose. Later answers are better but all can be achieved simply with

str.split(findStr).length

It does not drop trailing matches using the example in the question.

  • 1
    This has been covered in another answer already; and that answer did it better, too. – michaelb958 Jul 3 '13 at 13:52
  • 1
    This should be a comment on the answer in question, not another answer. – james.garriss Jan 24 '14 at 19:05
2

You can number of occurrences using inbuilt library function:

import org.springframework.util.StringUtils;
StringUtils.countOccurrencesOf(result, "R-")
  • 1
    Does not work, you should specify the dependency you used. – Saikat May 30 '16 at 7:39
1

try adding lastIndex+=findStr.length() to the end of your loop, otherwise you will end up in an endless loop because once you found the substring, you are trying to find it again and again from the same last position.

  • I did this and the function still does not work. – bobcom Apr 20 '09 at 10:59
1

Try this one. It replaces all the matches with a -.

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
int numberOfMatches = 0;
while (str.contains(findStr)){
    str = str.replaceFirst(findStr, "-");
    numberOfMatches++;
}

And if you don't want to destroy your str you can create a new string with the same content:

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String strDestroy = str;
String findStr = "hello";
int numberOfMatches = 0;
while (strDestroy.contains(findStr)){
    strDestroy = strDestroy.replaceFirst(findStr, "-");
    numberOfMatches++;
}

After executing this block these will be your values:

str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello"
strDestroy = "-slk-djladfj-"
findStr = "hello"
numberOfMatches = 3
1

As @Mr_and_Mrs_D suggested:

String haystack = "hellolovelyworld";
String needle = "lo";
return haystack.split(Pattern.quote(needle), -1).length - 1;
1

Based on the existing answer(s) I'd like to add a "shorter" version without the if:

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";

int count = 0, lastIndex = 0;
while((lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr, lastIndex)) != -1) {
    lastIndex += findStr.length() - 1;
    count++;
}

System.out.println(count); // output: 3
  • this one takes into account if the string repeats, for instance if you are looking for the string 'xx' in a string 'xxx'. – tCoe Sep 29 '16 at 21:23
0

This below method show how many time substring repeat on ur whole string. Hope use full to you:-

    String search_pattern="aaa";
    String whole_pattern=""aaaaaababaaaaaa;
    int j = search_pattern.length();
    for (int i = 0; i < whole_pattern.length() - j + 1; i++) {

        String str1 = whole_pattern.substring(i, j + i);

        System.out.println("sub string loop " + i + " => " + str1);

        if (str1.equals(search_pattern)) {
            Constants.k++;
        }

    }
0

here is the other solution without using regexp/patterns/matchers or even not using StringUtils.

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhelloarunkumarhelloasdhelloaruhelloasrhello";
        String findStr = "hello";
        int count =0;
        int findStrLength = findStr.length();
        for(int i=0;i<str.length();i++){
            if(findStr.startsWith(Character.toString(str.charAt(i)))){
                if(str.substring(i).length() >= findStrLength){
                    if(str.substring(i, i+findStrLength).equals(findStr)){
                        count++;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.println(count);
0

If you need the index of each substring within the original string, you can do something with indexOf like this:

 private static List<Integer> getAllIndexesOfSubstringInString(String fullString, String substring) {
    int pointIndex = 0;
    List<Integer> allOccurences = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    while(fullPdfText.indexOf(substring,pointIndex) >= 0){
       allOccurences.add(fullPdfText.indexOf(substring, pointIndex));
       pointIndex = fullPdfText.indexOf(substring, pointIndex) + substring.length();
    }
    return allOccurences;
}
0

Here is the advanced version for counting how many times the token occurred in a user entered string:

public class StringIndexOf {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.println("Enter a sentence please: \n");
        String string = scanner.nextLine();

        int atIndex = 0;
        int count = 0;

        while (atIndex != -1)
        {
            atIndex = string.indexOf("hello", atIndex);

            if(atIndex != -1)
            {
                count++;
                atIndex += 5;
            }
        }

        System.out.println(count);
    }

}
0
public static int getCountSubString(String str , String sub){
int n = 0, m = 0, counter = 0, counterSub = 0;
while(n < str.length()){
  counter = 0;
  m = 0;
  while(m < sub.length() && str.charAt(n) == sub.charAt(m)){
    counter++;
    m++; n++;
  }
  if (counter == sub.length()){
    counterSub++;
    continue;
  }
  else if(counter > 0){
    continue;
  }
  n++;
}

return  counterSub;

}

  • this question is 8 years old, and without any indication of why this is a better solution than the 22 other solutions posted, it should probably be removed – Jason Wheeler Nov 29 '17 at 23:36
  • simple reading and understanding – Nikolai Nechai May 6 '18 at 7:07
0

This solution prints the total number of occurrence of a given substring throughout the string, also includes the cases where overlapping matches do exist.

class SubstringMatch{
 public static void main(String []args){
    //String str = "aaaaabaabdcaa";
    //String sub = "aa";
    //String str = "caaab";
    //String sub = "aa";
    String str="abababababaabb";
    String sub = "bab";

    int n = str.length();
    int m = sub.length();

    // index=-1 in case of no match, otherwise >=0(first match position)
    int index=str.indexOf(sub), i=index+1, count=(index>=0)?1:0;
    System.out.println(i+" "+index+" "+count);

    // i will traverse up to only (m-n) position
    while(index!=-1 && i<=(n-m)){   
        index=str.substring(i, n).indexOf(sub);
        count=(index>=0)?count+1:count;
        i=i+index+1;  
        System.out.println(i+" "+index);
    }
    System.out.println("count: "+count);
 }

}

protected by Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 3 '13 at 14:08

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