13

I have a dataframe as the following :

   COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
   <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int>
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 2     1     1     1     1     1     2
 3     1     1     1     1     1     3
 4     1     1     1     1     1     4
 5     1     2     1     1     1     5
 6     1     1     1     1     1     6
 7     1     3     4     5     6     7
 8     1     1     1     1     1     8
 9     1     1     9     1     1     9
10     1     3     5     7     9    10

I'd like to filter this dataset to keep only values from COL_1 to COL_6 strictly increasing, so it would be as the following:

   COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
   <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int>
 7     1     3     4     5     6     7
10     1     3     5     7     9    10

EDIT : The code should be used in a function with a dynamic number of columns (which will be named from COL_1 to COL_N). A "basic" code such as

df %>% filter(COL_6 > COL_5 & ... & COL_2 > COL_1)

will not work in my situation. Thank you very much

9 Answers 9

14

Method 1: apply by rows

df[!colSums(apply(df, 1, diff) <= 0), ]

#    COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
# 7      1     3     4     5     6     7
# 10     1     3     5     7     9    10

The trick is that: ! + numeric vector will convert non-zeros to FALSE and zeros to TRUE.

!(-3:3)
# [1] FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE

Method 2: Map+Reduce (Much Faster)

df[Reduce(`&`, Map(`>`, df[-1], df[-ncol(df)])), ]

Benchmark on a larger dataset

library(microbenchmark)

bm <- microbenchmark(
  MrFlick = df[Reduce(\(x, y) { list(y, x[[2]] & (x[[1]] < y)) }, df, init = list(df[[1]]-1, TRUE))[[2]], ],
  Darren_2 = df[Reduce(`&`, Map(`>`, df[-1], df[-ncol(df)])), ],
  LMc = df[lapply(df, increasing())[[length(df)]], ],
  Thomas_2 = df[rowSums(df[-1] > df[-ncol(df)]) == ncol(df) - 1, ],
  Thomas_1 = df[rowMeans(df[-1] > df[-ncol(df)]) == 1, ],
  zx8754_1 = df[ apply(df, 1, \(i) !is.unsorted(i, strictly = TRUE)), ],
  Darren_1 = df[!colSums(apply(df, 1, diff) <= 0), ],
  zx8754_2 = df[ apply(df, 1, \(i) all(rank(i) == seq.int(ncol(df)))), ],
  setup = {
    nr <- 1e4
    df <- as.data.frame(matrix(runif(1e6, 0, 100), nr, 1e2))
    # pick 100 rows to sort
    ind <- sample(1:nr, 100)
    df[ind, ] <- t(apply(df[ind, ], 1, sort))
  },
  unit = "relative"
)

# Unit: relative
#      expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval
#   MrFlick  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000 1.0000000   100
#  Darren_2  1.106325  1.094651  1.076697  1.087586  1.005100 1.4959953   100
#       LMc  1.343194  1.341192  1.250389  1.331452  1.154049 0.9628282   100
#  Thomas_2  1.582195  1.572858  1.521608  1.574595  1.382800 1.3160589   100
#  Thomas_1  1.580272  1.563802  1.375415  1.552095  1.301315 1.1092026   100
#  zx8754_1  6.116539  6.362767  5.427589  6.896683  4.752581 2.2093543   100
#  Darren_1 23.723654 25.009280 20.208686 25.972528 19.187991 4.9937860   100
#  zx8754_2 44.612050 46.052300 34.288879 45.622591 29.601381 7.9472758   100

enter image description here

5
  • 1
    impressive benchmarking, +1 already! I found that ncol is faster than length, so I updated my solution :P Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 10:37
  • 1
    Would you consider adding my function factory solution to your benchmark? If so, I will remove it from mine to help keep the answers organized without a bunch of benchmarks laying around.
    – LMc
    Commented Apr 2 at 16:56
  • 1
    @LMc Of course! Could I insert ff() into lapply without defining a new object increasing ? I.e. LMc = df[lapply(df, ff())[[length(df)]],] Commented Apr 3 at 6:08
  • @LMc I have added your method to the benchmark. I think the efficiency is system-dependent. I use macOS 14 and R 4.3.3, and your method seems to have no significant improvement. You can also add another benchmark which uses other OS like windows. Commented Apr 3 at 10:05
  • There is at least one new solution if you feel like updating the benchmark.
    – s_baldur
    Commented Apr 3 at 12:17
12

With a bit of work, you could use Reduce for this. For example

keep <- Reduce(function(x, y) {
  list(y, x[[2]] & (x[[1]] < y))
}, dd, init=list(dd[[1]]-1, TRUE))[[2]]
which(keep)
# [1]  7 10
dd[keep, ]
#    COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
# 7      1     3     4     5     6     7
# 10     1     3     5     7     9    10

Tested with

dd <- read.table(text="
COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
1     1     1     1     1     1     1
2     1     1     1     1     1     2
3     1     1     1     1     1     3
4     1     1     1     1     1     4
5     1     2     1     1     1     5
6     1     1     1     1     1     6
7     1     3     4     5     6     7
8     1     1     1     1     1     8
9     1     1     9     1     1     9
10     1     3     5     7     9    10", header=TRUE)
0
5

One base R approach

df[colSums(apply(df,1,diff)>0)==ncol(df)-1,]

   COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
7      1     3     4     5     6     7
10     1     3     5     7     9    10
5

Try the following base R options

  • rowMeans
> df[rowMeans(df[-1] - df[-ncol(df)] > 0) == 1, ]
   COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
7      1     3     4     5     6     7
10     1     3     5     7     9    10
  • rowSums
> df[rowSums(df[-1] > df[-ncol(df)]) == ncol(df) - 1, ]
   COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
7      1     3     4     5     6     7
10     1     3     5     7     9    10
  • NA + &
> df[complete.cases(NA & (df[-1] <= df[-ncol(df)])), ]
   COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
7      1     3     4     5     6     7
10     1     3     5     7     9    10

Benchmarking (borrowed from @Darren Tsai)

bm <- microbenchmark(
    MrFlick = df[Reduce(function(x, y) {
        list(y, x[[2]] & (x[[1]] < y))
    }, df, init = list(df[[1]] - 1, TRUE))[[2]], ],
    Darren_1 = df[!colSums(apply(df, 1, diff) <= 0), ],
    Darren_2 = df[Reduce(`&`, Map(`>`, df[-1], df[-ncol(df)])), ],
    zx8754_1 = df[apply(df, 1, function(i) !is.unsorted(i, strictly = TRUE)), ],
    zx8754_2 = df[apply(df, 1, function(i) all(rank(i) == seq.int(ncol(df)))), ],
    tic1 = df[rowMeans(df[-1] > df[-ncol(df)]) == 1, ],
    tic2 = df[rowSums(df[-1] > df[-ncol(df)]) == ncol(df) - 1, ],
    tic3 = df[complete.cases(NA & (df[-1] <= df[-ncol(df)])), ],
    setup = {
        df <- as.data.frame(matrix(runif(1e6, 0, 100), 1e4, 1e2))
        ind <- sample(1:1e4, 1e2)
        df[ind, ] <- t(apply(df[ind, ], 1, sort))
    },
    times = 10L,
    unit = "relative"
)

which gives

> bm
Unit: relative
     expr        min         lq      mean    median         uq        max neval
  MrFlick  0.9080191  0.9144448  1.028867  1.127537  1.0952573  1.0503769    10
 Darren_1 16.5282125 17.7915946 19.161257 19.417784 20.7691135 19.3924344    10
 Darren_2  1.0000000  1.0000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.0000000  1.0000000    10
 zx8754_1  4.3833846  4.5916794  4.958092  4.617921  4.1234763  9.0226479    10
 zx8754_2 27.4681979 27.4405513 25.276613 26.550560 22.5151429 24.6191662    10
     tic1  1.0823147  1.3835146  1.997294  1.511849  1.5489377  6.0274525    10
     tic2  1.0455388  1.0989379  1.016991  1.069731  0.9690896  0.9463357    10
     tic3  2.1156887  2.1455595  2.289243  2.501887  2.1517687  2.5138369    10
5

Here is a fast solution that uses little memory (using bench::mark) by leveraging R environments. When you create a function it is bound to its current environment. This has two advantages:

  1. Environments are one of the fastest ways to look up a value.
  2. The bound environment provides "memory" in the sense that you can save state information, such as values from a previous iteration. This is efficient here so you don't need to iterate more than once.

We can leverage this by creating a function factory (a function that outputs a function):

increasing <- function() {
  prev <- is_incr <- NULL
  function(cur) {
    is_incr <<- if (is.null(prev)) rep(T, length(cur)) else (cur > prev) & is_incr
    prev <<- cur
    return(is_incr)
  }
}

df[lapply(df, increasing())[[length(df)]],]

Note - if you bind the "manufactured" function to a name, since information persists in the environment you would need to be re-assign the function before being calling its bound name again.


The tidyverse offers a (in my opinion) more readable solution using rowwise, if speed is not a concern:

library(dplyr)

df |>
  rowwise() |>
  filter(all(diff(c_across(starts_with('COL'))) > 0)) |>
  ungroup()

Output

  COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
  <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int>
1     1     3     4     5     6     7
2     1     3     5     7     9    10

Data

df <- structure(list(COL_1 = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L), COL_2 = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 3L, 1L, 1L, 3L), COL_3 = c(1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 4L, 1L, 9L, 5L), COL_4 = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 5L, 1L, 1L, 7L), COL_5 = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 6L, 
1L, 1L, 9L), COL_6 = 1:10), class = "data.frame", row.names = c("1", 
"2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10"))
3

Using is.unsorted, check if vector is unsorted, then negate:

dd[ apply(dd, 1, function(i) !is.unsorted(i, strictly = TRUE)), ]
#    COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
# 7      1     3     4     5     6     7
# 10     1     3     5     7     9    10

Using rank, check if the ranking same as 1:number of columns:

dd[ apply(dd, 1, function(i) all(rank(i) == seq.int(ncol(dd)))), ]
#    COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
# 7      1     3     4     5     6     7
# 10     1     3     5     7     9    10
3

With collapse, you can combine the very efficient fdiff with fmean to make a vectorized solution over all columns:

library(collapse)
dd[!fsum(fdiff(t(dd)) <= 0), ]
#or
dd[fmean(fdiff(t(dd)) > 0) == 1, ]

#    COL_1 COL_2 COL_3 COL_4 COL_5 COL_6
# 7      1     3     4     5     6     7
# 10     1     3     5     7     9    10

Another solution with matrixStats:

library(matrixStats)
dd[!rowSums(rowDiffs(as.matrix(dd)) <= 0), ]
2

Windows Benchmark

As noted by Darren Tsai, performance can be different depending on operating system. Their benchmark was done using macOS (14; R 4.3.3), which yields different results from this benchmark using Windows OS (11; R 4.3.2).

Please note that all credit for the code in this benchmark is due to @Darren Tsai:

library(microbenchmark)

bm <- microbenchmark(
  MrFlick = df[Reduce(\(x, y) { list(y, x[[2]] & (x[[1]] < y)) }, df, init = list(df[[1]]-1, TRUE))[[2]], ],
  Darren_2 = df[Reduce(`&`, Map(`>`, df[-1], df[-ncol(df)])), ],
  LMc = df[lapply(df, increasing())[[length(df)]], ],
  Thomas_2 = df[rowSums(df[-1] > df[-ncol(df)]) == ncol(df) - 1, ],
  Thomas_1 = df[rowMeans(df[-1] > df[-ncol(df)]) == 1, ],
  zx8754_1 = df[ apply(df, 1, \(i) !is.unsorted(i, strictly = TRUE)), ],
  Darren_1 = df[!colSums(apply(df, 1, diff) <= 0), ],
  zx8754_2 = df[ apply(df, 1, \(i) all(rank(i) == seq.int(ncol(df)))), ],
  Mael_1 = df[!fsum(fdiff(t(df)) <= 0), ],
  Mael_2 = df[fmean(fdiff(t(df)) > 0) == 1, ],
  Mael_3 = df[!rowSums(rowDiffs(as.matrix(df)) <= 0), ],
  s_baldur = foo(df),
  setup = {
    nr <- 1e4
    df <- as.data.frame(matrix(runif(1e6, 0, 100), nr, 1e2))
    # pick 100 rows to sort
    ind <- sample(1:nr, 100)
    df[ind, ] <- t(apply(df[ind, ], 1, sort))
  },
  unit = "relative"
)

Unit: relative
     expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval    cld
  MrFlick  2.169053  2.285558  2.546323  2.325461  3.248261  1.654346   100 ab    
 Darren_2  2.414262  2.489898  3.002182  2.550570  3.334476  9.840525   100 ab    
      LMc  1.533925  1.601322  1.824396  1.635918  1.995862  1.393127   100 a c   
 Thomas_2  2.371723  2.441504  3.830512  2.581123  3.389111  9.635126   100  bc   
 Thomas_1  2.347182  2.480311  3.342425  2.613655  3.662497  9.701333   100 ab    
 zx8754_1  9.393927 10.487596 11.526884 10.859309 10.780015 14.011331   100    d  
 Darren_1 41.450910 44.637811 46.028834 44.870025 54.627496 27.456965   100     e 
 zx8754_2 79.693158 81.192294 78.451829 80.940645 82.029202 49.281630   100      f
   Mael_1  3.141406  3.302421  4.223013  4.243030  4.284807  9.621037   100  bc   
   Mael_2  3.156144  3.304935  4.763161  4.182560  4.413637 10.729469   100  b    
   Mael_3  3.021654  3.077931  3.725033  3.928019  4.029050  8.687870   100  bc   
 s_baldur  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000   100 a     
microbenchmark:::autoplot.microbenchmark(bm)

enter image description here

2

A recursive solution that limits the comparisons to what is necessary. I use collapse for faster subsetting. This solution should beat others (doing all of the comparisons) when you can exclude many rows early.

library(collapse)

foo <- function(df) {
  candidates <- seq_len(nrow(df))
  upd_cand <- \(j) {
    if (j == ncol(df) || !length(candidates)) return()
    dfss <- fsubset(df, candidates, c(j-1L, j))
    candidates <<- candidates[which(dfss[[1L]] < dfss[[2L]])]
    upd_cand(j+1L)
  }
  upd_cand(2L)
  fsubset(df, candidates)
}

We could drop the collapse dependency easily (at a big performance cost):

basefoo <- function(df) {
  candidates <- seq_len(nrow(df))
  upd_cand <- \(j) {
    if (j == ncol(df) || !length(candidates)) return()
    dfss <- df[candidates, c(j-1L, j)]
    candidates <<- candidates[which(dfss[[1L]] < dfss[[2L]])]
    upd_cand(j+1L)
  }
  upd_cand(2L)
  df[candidates, ]
}

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