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I am currently looping through a directory and checking against an array that contains all strings I want to match to with

matches=("README.md" "*.pdf" "item_output")

while IFS= read -r -d '' i; do
    if [[ ${matches[*]} =~ $(basename $i) ]]; then
        echo $i
    fi
done <<(find /home/user/somedir -print0) 

However, instead of matching only the folder named "item_output", it also matches against a folder named "item".

How do I remedy this to only match the full string?

3 Answers 3

3

Well, the simple and efficient way is to use your globs directly in the find command:

find /home/user/somedir \
       -name 'README.md' \
    -o -name '*.pdf' \
    -o -name 'item_output'
2

It depends on the requirement but one way to achieve the exact match in bash is to loop through the array and check every element against the file name like so:

matches=("README.md" "*.pdf" "item_output")

while IFS= read -r -d '' file; do
    basefile=$(basename "$file")
    for match in "${matches[@]}"; do
        if [[ $basefile = $match ]]; then
            echo "$file"
            break
        fi
    done
done < <(find /home/user/somedir -print0)

Keep that in mind that the above wont work for *.pdf wildcard match. If you want to handle that, you can just add conditional to handle glob pattern:

matches=("README.md" "*.pdf" "item_output")

while IFS= read -r -d '' file; do
    basefile=$(basename "$file")
    for match in "${matches[@]}"; do
        if [[ $match == *"*"* && $basefile == $match ]] || [[ $basefile == $match ]]; then
            echo "$file"
            break
        fi
    done
done < <(find /home/user/somedir -print0)
1
  • Actually, the first version matches *.pdf as a glob pattern just fine. In a [[ ]] conditional expression, = and == are synonymous, and treat the right-hand side as a glob pattern (unless it's quoted). A separate test (as in the second version) is not necessary or relevant. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 17:43
2

I agree with Fravadona that it makes sense to let find do the heavy lifting here since it's more than capable. If you can't or don't want to hardcode the arguments though, you can generate them dynamically by looping over matches and building an argument array to pass to find.

#!/bin/bash
matches=("README.md" "*.pdf" "item_output")

find_args=( "-name" "${matches[0]}" )
for (( idx=1 ; idx < "${#matches[@]}" ; idx++ )) ; do
  find_args+=( "-o" "-name" "${matches[idx]}" )
done

find /home/user/somedir "${find_args[@]}"
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