212

How can I add 10 seconds to a javascript date object timeObject. Something like this I think..

var timeObject = new Date()     
var seconds = timeObject.getSeconds() + 10;
timeObject = timeObject + seconds;
356

There's a setSeconds method as well:

var t = new Date();
t.setSeconds(t.getSeconds() + 10);

For a list of the other Date functions, you should check out MDN


setSeconds will correctly handle wrap-around cases:

var d;
d = new Date('2014-01-01 10:11:55');
alert(d.getMinutes() + ':' + d.getSeconds()); //11:55
d.setSeconds(d.getSeconds() + 10);
alert(d.getMinutes() + ':0' + d.getSeconds()); //12:05

  • 2
    Beware, my Nodejs installation returns d.getSeconds() as a string. I had to change this to (+d.getSeconds()) The unary plus converts a string to a number. Perhaps a little more obvious would be 1*d.getSeconds() – tqwhite Nov 30 '16 at 21:41
  • 1
    @tqwhite, typeof new Date().getSeconds() returns 'number' in node, so I think you may have other issues (unless you're on an outdated version of node or something). – zzzzBov Nov 30 '16 at 21:44
  • 2
    Try doing d.setSeconds(d.getSeconds() - 92); and you'll end up with 2'32" difference instead of 1'32". The solution with new Date(d.getTime() - 92*1000); works however ! – Rafalon Oct 16 '17 at 12:42
  • @Rafalon, that doesn't appear to be the case, please double check and provide a working example of the behavior you describe. – zzzzBov Oct 16 '17 at 13:48
  • @zzzzBov which browser do you use ? I was on IE11 when I noticed the difference, I'll doublecheck tomorrow – Rafalon Oct 16 '17 at 16:22
90
// var timeObject = new Date();

new Date(timeObject.getTime() + 10000);
  • 29
    ... and the reason you added 10000 is because Javascript dates work in milliseconds, i.e. 10000 = 10 * 1000 – psiphi75 Jun 17 '14 at 3:45
  • 1
    And the + before timeObject is needed because it casts timeObject to a number. So its like timeObject.getTime() in Ron's answer – James Jan 16 '15 at 13:58
  • 1
    JavaScript is so nasty. These early APIs are a bit screwed up. – usr Aug 21 '17 at 13:01
  • Nice immutable way ;) – Yves M. Jun 13 at 9:22
53
var timeObject = new Date(); 
timeObject = new Date(timeObject .getTime() + 1000*10);
console.log(timeObject);

Also please refer: How to add 30 minutes to a JavaScript Date object?

  • 6
    of all the wrong answers here, this is the correct one. – Cory Mawhorter Feb 28 '14 at 22:07
  • Yes, this is the correct answer. Unfortunately Google is referring to this Question if searching for "javascript date add seconds" and the most voted answer is wrong. – Philipp Gächter Jun 23 '14 at 7:32
  • 2
    Can anybody please explain what the selected answer (currently from @zzzzBov) is doing wrong? It works for me. – tsemer Jul 21 '16 at 10:55
  • @tsemer I think that works. From MDN: If a parameter you specify is outside of the expected range, setSeconds() attempts to update the date information in the Date object accordingly. For example, if you use 100 for secondsValue, the minutes stored in the Date object will be incremented by 1, and 40 will be used for seconds. – Ron Aug 17 '16 at 11:18
  • 1
    @tsemer, at the first glance, I thought zzzzBov's answer is not right, because I didn't think it will update the minute value if it is out of the range. But because of your "challenging", I reviewed the MDN, and confirmed that answer is definitely right. :) – Ron Aug 19 '16 at 11:15
50

Just for the performance maniacs among us.

getTime

var d = new Date('2014-01-01 10:11:55');
d = new Date(d.getTime() + 10000);

5,196,949 Ops/sec, fastest


setSeconds

var d = new Date('2014-01-01 10:11:55');
d.setSeconds(d.getSeconds() + 10);

2,936,604 Ops/sec, 43% slower


moment.js

var d = new moment('2014-01-01 10:11:55');
d = d.add(10, 'seconds');

22,549 Ops/sec, 100% slower


So maybe its the least human readable (not that bad) but the fastest way of going :)

jspref online tests

  • 2
    Thanks for the details, very useful :) – Dean May 17 '18 at 16:45
9

Try this

a = new Date();
a.setSeconds(a.getSeconds() + 10);
4
timeObject.setSeconds(timeObject.getSeconds() + 10)
3

I have a couple of new variants

  1. var t = new Date(Date.now() + 10000);
  2. var t = new Date(+new Date() + 10000);
2

The Date() object in javascript is not that smart really.

If you just focus on adding seconds it seems to handle things smoothly but if you try to add X number of seconds then add X number of minute and hours, etc, to the same Date object you end up in trouble. So I simply fell back to only using the setSeconds() method and converting my data into seconds (which worked fine).

If anyone can demonstrate adding time to a global Date() object using all the set methods and have the final time come out correctly I would like to see it but I get the sense that one set method is to be used at a time on a given Date() object and mixing them leads to a mess.

var vTime = new Date();

var iSecondsToAdd = ( iSeconds + (iMinutes * 60) + (iHours * 3600) + (iDays * 86400) );

vTime.setSeconds(iSecondsToAdd);

Here is some more documentation that may help:

2
  1. you can use setSeconds method by getting seconds from today and just adding 10 seconds in it

    var today = new Date();
    today.setSeconds(today.getSeconds() + 10);
    
  2. You can add 10 *1000 milliseconds to the new date:

    var today = new Date(); 
    today = new Date(today.getTime() + 1000*10);
    
  3. You can use setTime:

    today.setTime(now.getTime() + 10000)
    

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