80

Is it possible to specify a column type of unsigned integer in Doctrine 2?

6 Answers 6

141
/**
 * @ORM\Column(name="id", type="integer", options={"unsigned"=true})
 */

There is no place in the doc (that I've seen) that speak about this, but it works.

Update

Definition in Yaml (as of 2.4 for primary key)

id:
  type: integer
  options:
    unsigned: true
11
  • 5
    This will fail using SQLite as it only supports signed integers. Jun 12, 2013 at 19:03
  • this is actually mentioned in the documentation docs.doctrine-project.org/projects/doctrine1/en/latest/en/… and yes its database specific.
    – gondo
    Oct 1, 2013 at 0:22
  • @gondo, that's Doctrine 1.
    – glen-84
    Oct 1, 2013 at 18:58
  • 1
    @hardik as we can see at gondo links to doctrine on github "repositoryClass : Doctrine\Tests\Models\DDC869\DDC869PaymentRepository id: id: type: integer unsigned: true"
    – Mikl
    Jun 3, 2014 at 14:31
  • 2
    @hardik like: options: { unsigned: true }?
    – MauganRa
    Dec 8, 2014 at 13:15
21

You can but you will loose portability. Use columnDefinition attribute and set it to integer unsigned. The actual code depends on what you are using.

columnDefinition: DDL SQL snippet that starts after the column name and specifies the complete (non-portable!) column definition. This attribute allows to make use of advanced RMDBS features. However you should make careful use of this feature and the consequences. SchemaTool will not detect changes on the column correctly anymore if you use “columnDefinition”.

Doctrine reference: https://www.doctrine-project.org/projects/doctrine-orm/en/latest/reference/annotations-reference.html#column

1
  • 4
    Losing portability is unacceptable in an ORM. Set to decimal with a precision of 0 instead. Jun 12, 2013 at 16:59
16

Doctrine 1 documentation and Doctrine 2 documentation said you can do it by this ways:

PHP annotations:

/**
 * @Column(type="integer", name="some_field", options={"unsigned":true})
 */
protected $someField;

Yaml: (see docs)

MyEntity:
  fields:
    someField:
      type: integer
      column: some_field
      options:
        unsigned: true

Hope this helps to someone to save a time ;)

14

Decimals will allow for such large numbers and allow you to keep the SchemaTool, just set the scale to 0.

<?php
/**
 * @Column(type="decimal", precision=20, scale=0, nullable=false, unique=true)
 */
Protected $facebookId;

Checkout a full writeup on why here. [EDIT](link does not work) I have pasted the article below. It was written by me anyways ;)

unsigned numbers so large your brain will explode! w/Doctrine 2

ORMs have an inherent problem. How do you take a datatype only some RDBMSs support and allow you to use it anyways. Well when it comes to Doctrine 2 and unsigned numbers they got a little lazy.

All I want to do is store my 64bit facebook IDs. How hard is that? Well my RDBMS is mySQL so all I really need is an unsigned bigint.

<?php
/**
 * @Column(type="bigint", nullable=false, unique=true, columnDefinition="unsigned")
 */
Protected $facebookId;

This seems find and dandy until you read this:

columnDefinition: DDL SQL snippet that starts after the column name and specifies the complete (non-portable!) column definition. This attribute allows to make use of advanced RMDBS features. However you should make careful use of this feature and the consequences. SchemaTool will not detect changes on the column correctly anymore if you use “columnDefinition”. Basically this feature let’s you free form unsupported things into the column definition. Making unsigned numbers technically UN-SUPPORTED! Not to mention my dev and QA deployment systems rely heavily on the SchemaTool. We can thank a combination of lazy developers at Doctrine and sqlite3 for this little nugget of crazy town.

This immediately prompted a google search. I don’t like thinking if I don’t have to. What did I find? Everybody’s using varchars. VARCHARS!?!? I about had a heart attack. That was just unacceptable.

Thus enters decimal. It’s perfect. The storage size is variable and it’s stored in binary so indexing is super fast. We just set the decimal precision to zero and voilà. The ORM can port this to any RDBMS, it’s big enough for us not to care about the unsupported signed/unsigned issue and it’s lightning fast. decimal(20,0) should handle our facebook size of eighteen quintillion four hundred and forty six quadrillion seven hundred and forty four trillion seventy three billion seven hundred and nine million five hundred and fifty one thousand six hundred and fifteen quite nicely.

<?php
/**
 * @Column(type="decimal", precision=20, scale=0, nullable=false, unique=true)
 */
Protected $facebookId;
6
  • The full write up link is broken. And the answer does not work or make sense without it. Could you please elaborate or fix the link? Oct 20, 2012 at 23:44
  • @PutzKipa I have pasted the other article I had written into the bottom of this answer. Jun 12, 2013 at 17:00
  • 1
    @BradyEmerson Why are they flipped? Precision tells us out many decimal points. In this case we are highjacking a floating point number to be used as a whole number so Precision is 0. Scale is the memory allocation size we must fit the large number, so 20 is the best number to fit our Facebook needs, 19 is sadly to small and 0 (as you sugest) will not even save a number. Oct 17, 2013 at 20:30
  • 1
    At least for MySQL, precision is the maximum number of digits; scale is the number of digits right of the decimal. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/… Oct 21, 2013 at 12:27
  • 1
    BTW: facebook IDs are strings according to developers.facebook.com/docs/graph-api/reference/v2.1/user But regardless decimals are nice for other data they can store. Oct 20, 2014 at 22:04
2

I have the same problem with doctrine 2. and i solve it the same way, but there are some advantages :

/**
 * @ORM\Column(name="id", type="integer", options={"unsigned"=true})
 */

Running diff migration bin/console doctrine:migration:diff will do some magic.In fact, if the column was a foreign key in other tables, the doctrine is able to find them out and apply the same update row as the concerned column.

You just need in your migration to remove foreign keys before and add them after the column type transformation.

1

Using attributes (PHP >= 8, Doctrine >= 2.9):

use Doctrine\ORM\Mapping as ORM;

/// ...

#[ORM\Column(type: 'integer', options: [
    "unsigned" => true
])]

Source: https://www.doctrine-project.org/projects/doctrine-orm/en/2.11/reference/attributes-reference.html#column

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