6

OK, so I have a situation in which I call LoadLibrary on a DLL that I wrote. This call to LoadLibrary returns error #998, or ERROR_NOACCESS "Invalid access to memory location."

The DLL in question uses MFC in one configuration, and not in another; only the MFC configuration has this problem. It used to work, but I have no idea what I changed: I'd actually moved on to the non-MFC version and been tinkering quite a lot with that and I have no idea what I could have done that affected the MFC version.

I don't know a lot about DLLs. The original loading code was actually given to me, and I haven't changed it. Below is that code:

// submodule loading
#ifndef MFC
// Project uses standard windows libraries, define an entry point for the DLL to handle loading/unloading
BOOL WINAPI DllMain(HANDLE hDllHandle, DWORD dwReason, LPVOID lpreserved)
{
    _MESSAGE("DllMain called.");
    switch(dwReason)
    {
    case DLL_PROCESS_ATTACH:    // dll loaded
        hModule = (HMODULE)hDllHandle;  // store module handle
        _MESSAGE("Attaching Submodule ..."); 
        break;
    case DLL_PROCESS_DETACH:    // dll unloaded
        _MESSAGE("Detaching Submodule ...");      
        break;
    }   
    return true;
}
#else
// Project uses MFC, we define here an instance of CWinApp to make this a 'well-formed' DLL
class CSubmoduleApp : public CWinApp
{
public:
    virtual BOOL InitInstance()
    {// dll loaded
        hModule = m_hInstance;  // store module handle
        _MESSAGE("Attaching Submodule ...");
        return true;
    }
    virtual int ExitInstance()
    {// dll unloaded
       _MESSAGE("Detaching Submodule ...");      
       return CWinApp::ExitInstance();
    }
} gApp;
#endif

Obviously, MFC is defined in the MFC configuration, and not otherwise.

I doubt this is enough information to solve this problem; I realize that. What I'm actually hoping to learn is where to look for problems that might cause this error. I'll be happy to supply any information you need — once I know it's needed.

Thanks for any tips.

  • Have you tried running it in a debugger? That should pinpoint the error for you quickly. – Carey Gregory Oct 7 '11 at 22:58
  • 1
    You certainly can run this under the debugger. You need to set a break point nice and early in the code and assign a host app. – David Heffernan Oct 7 '11 at 23:23
  • 1
    Have you tried loading your DLL from a test program instead of from the original host program? If you're lucky, it will exhibit the same error, which would make debugging a lot simpler. – Harry Johnston Oct 8 '11 at 1:06
  • 1
    Maybe, but if the error is occurring as soon as the DLL loads, it won't make any difference, will it? – Harry Johnston Oct 9 '11 at 5:14
  • 2
    DllMain (and hence, presumably, InitInstance) is a special case; code that works perfectly well elsewhere might break when called from DllMain. – Harry Johnston Oct 10 '11 at 1:14
14

OK, this question was answered by a friend of mine (no idea if he has a StackOverflow account; not going to pester him with answering it twice).

The deal is that I had a global object, the class of which had a constructor that called a function that depended upon another global object (ironically enough, the function in question was _MESSAGE, but by the time DllMain or InitInstance gets called, that function works fine). C++ doesn't allow you to specify the order in which globals get initialized, so when this global's constructor got run (when the computer attempted to load the DLL), it caused a memory error by attempting to use another global that hadn't been created yet.

So... that's the answer. A really specific case, but I guess if anyone else finds they're getting 998 errors and need to know what sorts of problems to check, this is something to look for: make sure all your globals are independent!

  • 1
    There are standard techniques for enforcing order of static initialization – David Heffernan Oct 11 '11 at 6:24
  • 1
    OK, I did not know that (and I guess my friend didn't either). Point is, I wasn't using them. I'll look into that. – KRyan Oct 11 '11 at 11:59
  • 3
    @DavidHeffernan a reference would be useful. – atoMerz Dec 1 '13 at 10:15
  • 1
    This worked for me. Had a pointer bug in static initializations in the DLL that only got triggered during a manual LoadLibrary() call, not if linking to it directly via the DLL's import library. – metal Jul 11 '14 at 13:38
  • 2
    I wish I'd read this 5 hours ago. – Rotem Jul 3 '15 at 10:05

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