5

I am following Skiena's Algorithm Design Manual v3.

I have seen a few questions stating that there are certain typos in the book, and I am not sure whether this is one or just because I cannot understand it.

Consider the following:

typedef struct edgenode {
    int y;                   /* adjacency info */
    int weight;              /* edge weight, if any */
    struct edgenode *next;   /* next edge in list */
} edgenode;

typedef struct {
    edgenode *edges[MAXV+1];  /* adjacency info */
    int degree[MAXV+1];       /* outdegree of each vertex */
    int nvertices;            /* number of vertices in the graph */
    int nedges;               /* number of edges in the graph */
    int directed;             /* is the graph directed? */
} graph;

void insert_edge(graph *g, int x, int y, bool directed) {
    edgenode *p;        /* temporary pointer */

    p = malloc(sizeof(edgenode));    /* allocate edgenode storage */

    p->weight = 0;
    p->y = y;
    p->next = g->edges[x];

    g->edges[x] = p;    /* insert at head of list */

    g->degree[x]++;

    if (!directed) {
        insert_edge(g, y, x, true);
    } else {
        g->nedges++;
    }
}

As far as I understand, void insert_edge(graph *g, int x, int y, bool directed) connects two nodes at array index x and y by adding them to edges array.

The following snippet confuses me:

p->y = y;
p->next = g->edges[x];

g->edges[x] = p;    /* insert at head of list */

How is this working? Suppose my input is x = 3, y = 4, and this is the first input.

I would expect something like 3 -> 4 for a directed graph.

  1. p->y = y; makes perfect sense, the adjacent of x is y.
  2. p->next = g->edges[x]; But the edges array is initialized to null. Won't this make 3.next == NULL instead of 3.next == 4?
  3. g->edges[x] = p; What? edges[x] == x Node, this confuses me.

The complete code can be found at graph.c and graph.h.

I think p.next = y; somehow and y.next = NULL as of now i.e. the first insertion. Maybe it's my rusty C but need some help on this.

7
  • A proper implementation should create both x and y nodes IMO, this implementation looks strange to me. I tried to replicate it in Java, but all these points confused me.
    – VIAGC
    Aug 27, 2023 at 6:48
  • 1
    edges is a linked list. That part is just prepending to that list. .next is actually the next edge in the linked list of edges. (Separately, I think x is implied somehow. Maybe this linked list is converted to an array later and x is implied from the array index?)
    – Ouroborus
    Aug 27, 2023 at 7:55
  • 1
    Yeah, you can see in transpose that x is implied from how deep into the linked list the edge is.
    – Ouroborus
    Aug 27, 2023 at 8:00
  • This is confusing, I get the analogy that a node has a next node, like a linked list, but edge has a next edge? This sounds confusing. I will read more to make logical sense of this.
    – VIAGC
    Aug 27, 2023 at 8:03
  • 1
    Just a correction to a comment above: edges is not a linked list: it is a (fixed size) array. There are linked lists at a deeper level: edges[0], edges[1], ... are linked lists (i.e. pointers to the first nodes of those lists), and new edgenode nodes are prepended to those lists, meaning that the head is always the newest added node and thus edges[x] needs to be updated at each insertion.
    – trincot
    Aug 27, 2023 at 10:50

1 Answer 1

2

As far as I understand, insert_edge connects two nodes at array index x and y by adding them to edges array.

I wouldn't call this "addding to edges array", since the edges array has a fixed length, and has an entry for each node (not for each edge).

The index of edges identifies the "from" vertex of an edge, and the y field of an edgenode identifies the corresponding "to" vertex of that same edge.

For each vertex x, this code maintains a linked list of edges (not edges, but edges[x]), which initially will be empty.

Let's do this for an example graph:

enter image description here

...which after initialisation is populated with its edges as follows:

insert_edge(g, 0, 1, true); 
insert_edge(g, 0, 2, true); 
insert_edge(g, 1, 2, true); 
insert_edge(g, 2, 3, true); 
insert_edge(g, 3, 4, true); 

Let's see how this populates the graph data structure. We start out with this state for g (where I will assume MAXV is 4 for this representation):

    ┌───────────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐    
g ─►│ edges     │  - │  - │  - │  - │  - │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┼────┼────┼────┤
    │ degree    │  0 │  0 │  0 │  0 │  0 │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┴────┴────┴────┘
    │ nvertices │  5 │ 
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ nedges    │  0 │
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ directed  │true│
    └───────────┴────┘

The hyphens represent nullpointer values. I assume all this has been initialised properly.

Then insert_edge(g, 0, 1, true) will create a p node, which is allocated and initialised to this:

    ┌────────┬────┐
p ─►│ weight │  0 │
    ├────────┼────┤
    │ y      │  1 │
    ├────────┼────┤
    │ next   │  - │
    └────────┴────┘

Notably the next field is nullptr, because that is the value found at g->edges[0].

Then the next statement g->edges[x] = p makes the link, and after two counters have been incremented, the function has finished its job:

                      ┌────────┬────┐
                  p ─►│ weight │  0 │
                      ├────────┼────┤
                      │ y      │  1 │
                      ├────────┼────┤
                   ┌─►│ next   │  - │
                   │  └────────┴────┘
                   │
                   │
                   │
                   │
    ┌───────────┬──│─┬────┬────┬────┬────┐    
g ─►│ edges     │  ┴ │  - │  - │  - │  - │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┼────┼────┼────┤
    │ degree    │  1 │  0 │  0 │  0 │  0 │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┴────┴────┴────┘
    │ nvertices │  5 │ 
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ nedges    │  1 │
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ directed  │true│
    └───────────┴────┘

Now we get to the more interesting one: insert_edge(g, 0, 2, true);. Again p is pointed to a new edgenode, but this time g->edges[0] is not nullptr and so p->next will get to point to the previously added edgenode. After insert_edge finishes we get this:

                      ┌────────┬────┐  ┌────────┬────┐
                  p ─►│ weight │  0 │  │ weight │  0 │
                      ├────────┼────┤  ├────────┼────┤
                      │ y      │  2 │  │ y      │  1 │
                      ├────────┼────┤  ├────────┼────┤
                   ┌─►│ next   │  ────►│ next   │  - │
                   │  └────────┴────┘  └────────┴────┘
                   │
                   │
                   │
                   │
    ┌───────────┬──│─┬────┬────┬────┬────┐    
g ─►│ edges     │  ┴ │  - │  - │  - │  - │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┼────┼────┼────┤
    │ degree    │  2 │  0 │  0 │  0 │  0 │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┴────┴────┴────┘
    │ nvertices │  5 │ 
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ nedges    │  2 │
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ directed  │true│
    └───────────┴────┘

And so it continues for the other edges: every time the new edgenode is prepended to a linked list of which the head pointer is stored in the edges array. We have 5 linked lists: one for each vertex.

Here is the end result for the above example:

                      ┌────────┬────┐  ┌────────┬────┐
                      │ weight │  0 │  │ weight │  0 │
                      ├────────┼────┤  ├────────┼────┤
                      │ y      │  2 │  │ y      │  1 │
                      ├────────┼────┤  ├────────┼────┤
                   ┌─►│ next   │  ────►│ next   │  - │
                   │  └────────┴────┘  └────────┴────┘
                   │       ┌────────┬────┐  ┌────────┬────┐
                   │       │ weight │  0 │  │ weight │  0 │
                   │       ├────────┼────┤  ├────────┼────┤
                   │       │ y      │  4 │  │ y      │  2 │
                   │       ├────────┼────┤  ├────────┼────┤
                   │    ┌─►│ next   │  ────►│ next   │  - │
                   │    │  └────────┴────┘  └────────┴────┘
                   │    │       ┌────────┬────┐
                   │    │       │ weight │  0 │
                   │    │       ├────────┼────┤
                   │    │       │ y      │  3 │
                   │    │       ├────────┼────┤
                   │    │    ┌─►│ next   │  - │
                   │    │    │  └────────┴────┘
                   │    │    │       ┌────────┬────┐
                   │    │    │       │ weight │  0 │
                   │    │    │       ├────────┼────┤
                   │    │    │       │ y      │  4 │
                   │    │    │       ├────────┼────┤
                   │    │    │    ┌─►│ next   │  - │
                   │    │    │    │  └────────┴────┘
    ┌───────────┬──│─┬──│─┬──│─┬──│─┬────┐    
g ─►│ edges     │  ┴ │  ┴ │  ┴ │  ┴ │  - │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┼────┼────┼────┤
    │ degree    │  2 │  2 │  1 │  1 │  0 │
    ├───────────┼────┼────┴────┴────┴────┘
    │ nvertices │  5 │ 
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ nedges    │  6 │
    ├───────────┼────┤
    │ directed  │true│
    └───────────┴────┘

Hope this clarifies it.

1
  • 1
    What a detailed answer!! Thanks a lot!
    – VIAGC
    Aug 27, 2023 at 13:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.