4

I'm writing an Android app using the NDK and NativeActivity. My app depends on a few bits of third party code that are shipped as assets. Currently I'm working on trying to extract those assets while keeping the folder structure intact.

I've tried using the AssetManager, but to keep the folder structure intact it seemed like there would a huge amount of code involved, for a simple task such as what I've mentioned. I've since switched focus to try to implement treating the APK as a ZIP file and extract its contents that way. But that requires I find the exact path to the APK.

In a normal Android app one would use getPackageCodePath, but this is an abstract method attached to the Context class. My question is how do I obtain the exact path to the APK when not using a normal Activity?

Also I tried calling getPackageCodePath via JNI, but that crashed the app on account of not being able to find the method.

EDIT: Is this even possible?

5 Answers 5

8

I was actually able to call getPackageCodePath via JNI and get it to work. The following code put at the top of android_main in the native-activity sample in NDK r7 logs the correct path and doesn't crash:

void android_main(struct android_app* state) {
    struct engine engine;

    ANativeActivity* activity = state->activity;
    JNIEnv* env = activity->env;

    jclass clazz = (*env)->GetObjectClass(env, activity->clazz);
    jmethodID methodID = (*env)->GetMethodID(env, clazz, "getPackageCodePath", "()Ljava/lang/String;");
    jobject result = (*env)->CallObjectMethod(env, activity->clazz, methodID);

    const char* str;
    jboolean isCopy;
    str = (*env)->GetStringUTFChars(env, (jstring)result, &isCopy);
    LOGI("Looked up package code path: %s", str);

    ...
}

I feel like this might not be a great solution, though. There are two things that worry me:

  1. Thread safety - there's an ugly warning about only using the env member of ANativeActivity in the main Java thread, and if I understand things correctly, this code is going to get run in the native activity's thread.
  2. ANativeActivity's clazz member appears to be misnamed and is actually the instance of the Java NativeActivity instead of the class object. Otherwise this code wouldn't work. I really hate relying on something that is obviously misnamed like this.

Aside from that, it works, and I'm actually about to use it myself to try to extract the assets out of the .apk using libzip and into the data directory.

2
  • It seems like I tried something similar to this but it didn't work. Hmm, I guess I left out something. Thanks for your answer :)
    – rstat1
    Commented Dec 11, 2011 at 2:05
  • 3
    Regarding my concern #1 above: It turns out that thread safety can be achieved by using the JavaVM's AttachCurrentThread function. This will create/retrieve a JNIEnv that should be used instead of the one I listed above. ANativeActivity's vm member is a JavaVM. When done using the JNIEnv in the thread, you should call JavaVM's DetachCurrentThread and stop using the JNIEnv. The original code I gave was actually crashing on some devices, but when the Attach/DetachCurrentThread started being called, it stopped crashing and worked great.
    – matt
    Commented Mar 29, 2012 at 15:28
4

Since I just had to search for exactly how to do the attach/detach calls I'll paste the updated version here.

The following seems to get the right location without crashing (after minimal testing)

    ANativeActivity* activity = state->activity;
    JNIEnv* env=0;

    (*activity->vm)->AttachCurrentThread(activity->vm, &env, 0);

    jclass clazz = (*env)->GetObjectClass(env, activity->clazz);
    jmethodID methodID = (*env)->GetMethodID(env, clazz, "getPackageCodePath", "()Ljava/lang/String;");
    jobject result = (*env)->CallObjectMethod(env, activity->clazz, methodID);

    const char* str;
    jboolean isCopy;
    str = (*env)->GetStringUTFChars(env, (jstring)result, &isCopy);
    LOGI("Looked up package code path: %s", str);

    (*activity->vm)->DetachCurrentThread(activity->vm);
3

Had to modify it to this in the year 2014.

ANativeActivity* activity = state->activity;
JNIEnv* env=0;

activity->vm->AttachCurrentThread(&env, NULL);

jclass clazz = env->GetObjectClass(activity->clazz);
jmethodID methodID = env->GetMethodID(clazz, "getPackageCodePath", "()Ljava/lang/String;");
jobject result = env->CallObjectMethod(activity->clazz, methodID);

jboolean isCopy;
std::string res = env->GetStringUTFChars((jstring)result, &isCopy);
LOG_DEBUG("Looked up package code path: %s", res.c_str());

activity->vm->DetachCurrentThread();
3

Did you try to read /proc/self/cmdline from your application? You should be able to open it as a normal (as far as proc files are normal :-) so you can read from the file until EOF, but not seek) c FILE and read from it.

As an example for the phone app, I can see from ps in android that the name of the applications is the expected app name:

 # ps | grep phone 
 radio     1588  839   1467420 103740 SyS_epoll_ 7f7de374ac S com.android.phone

And checking the cmdline for that pid returns a good app name:

 # cat /proc/1588/cmdline
 com.android.phone
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  • I don't think that'd work. The process name is not usually the same as the name of the actual apk file. Sometimes (especially after updates) a number gets stuck on the end that isn't represented in the process name. I also wasn't looking for the app name I was looking for the name of the package file. The response marked as the answer above solved the problem for me.
    – rstat1
    Commented Aug 16, 2016 at 19:59
2

Call getPackageCodePath() in Java and pass jstring to your C++ app via native method

1
  • 2
    Well yes that I knew of..but in a NativeActivity app there is no Java code, so that can't be used.
    – rstat1
    Commented Dec 3, 2011 at 5:32

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