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I'm trying to match an entire string that starts with a certain string and then match any number of characters except ::, if :: was matched then only accept if followed by the string CASE.

So for example: A string that starts with Linus:: followed by 0 or more 1 characters except if :: then CASE has to follow else only matches everything before the ::.

Linus::AOPKNS::CASE would capture the entire string

Linus::AOPKNS would capture the entire string

Linus::AOPKNS::OK would only capture Linus::AOPKNS

I imagine I'd have to use a positive lookahead but I'm not quite sure how to do that considering I wanna match any number of characters before the ::.

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  • Just to clarify, the string is allowed to contain a single : (or even more than one, as long as they're not consecutive)? Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 5:27
  • Also do you want that third example to result in no match, or do you want to only capture everything before the :: (which is the same as the second example)? Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 5:33
  • "Just to clarify, the string is allowed to contain a single : (or even more than one, as long as they're not consecutive)?": Yes "Also do you want that third example to result in no match, or do you want to only capture everything before the :: (which is the same as the second example)?" I edited the question to make it more clear
    – NOT
    Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 5:51
  • 1
    Your first sentence suggests that the string could be "Linus::A::CASE::B" or "Linus::A::B::CASE" in which case you would want to match "Linus::A::CASE" and "Linus::A", respectively. Correct? Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 20:24

4 Answers 4

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Use a tempered greedy token:

^                  # Match at the start of the string
Linus::            # 'Linus::', literally,
(?:(?!::).)+       # followed by a sequence of characters that doesn't contain '::'
(?:::CASE)?        # and, optionally, '::CASE'.

Try it on regex101.com.

Depending on your use case, you might want to add a \b (word boundary) at the end of the pattern.

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  • This will still match if there are characters after CASE in the string
    – Nick
    Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 6:33
  • @Nick That depends on whether OP wants CASE to be the only thing after :: or not. However, I added a note just in case they do mean the former.
    – InSync
    Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 6:54
  • Agreed, it's not 100% clear, but that was my interpretation.
    – Nick
    Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 6:55
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This is probably most easily achieved by matching either a string which includes ::CASE or if that fails, matching a string up to either :: or end-of-string:

^Linus::(?:.*::CASE$|.*?(?=::|$))

Demo on regex101

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  • Hey I know realise my question was not clear. For the third case I wanna capture everything before the ::
    – NOT
    Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 5:53
  • @NOT I've updated my answer to match your requirements
    – Nick
    Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 6:30
  • No problems. Sorry about the slow response, I was in a meeting.
    – Nick
    Commented Sep 16, 2023 at 6:34
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In my understanding you don't want to match over a double colon that's not followed by CASE even if there is ::CASE beyond like in Linus::AOP::KNS::CASE but keep matching any consecutive ::CASE that might occur like in Linus::AOPKNS::CASE::CASE.

^Linus::(?:[^:]+|:(?!:)|::CASE)*

See this demo at regex101 (\n in the demo is just for multiline showcase)

This will match a string starting with Linux:: followed by

  1. [^:]+ One or more characters that are not a colon
  2. |:(?!:) Or a colon if not followed by another colon
  3. |::CASE A double colon folllowed by the substring

The (?: non-capturing group ) is repeated any amount of times.


Or partly unrolled for better performance: ^Linus::[^:]*(?::(?::CASE|(?!:))[^:]*)*


Just to mention, all yet provided answers have little differences in what can get matched.

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2

You can match

^Linus::.*?(?=::(?!CASE\b)|$)

Demo

The regular expression can be broken down as follows.

^Linus::      # match "Linus::" at the beginning of the string
.*?           # match zero or more characters other than line terminators,
              # as few characters as possible (?)
(?=           # begin a positive lookahead
  ::          # match "::"
  (?!         # begin a negative lookahead
    CASE\b    # match "CASE" followed by a word boundary
  )           # end the negative lookahead
  |           # or
  $           # match the end of the string
)             # end the positive lookahead

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