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I'm having trouble applying Tailwind CSS classes in my React component. Specifically, I have a RetroButton component that should change its background color based on the color prop passed to it. However, despite passing the prop correctly, the button's color doesn't change.

I've defined the component like this:

// RetroButton.ts

import React from 'react'

type Color = "red" | "green" | "grey";

type ButtonProps = {
    color: Color;
    context: string;
}

export default function RetroButton({color,context}:ButtonProps){

const retroButtonClasses = `box-border border-b-6 border-x-6 border-gray-800
                    bg-${color}-retro text-white text-lg
                    cursor-pointer inline-block
                    m-4 min-w-48 p-2 uppercase
                    hover:bg-${color}-retro-hover focus:bg-${color}-retro-hover`;
                    
const retroButtonStyles = {
    borderBottom: '6px inset rgba(0,0,0,.5)',
    borderLeft: '6px inset rgba(0,0,0,.5)',
    borderRight: '6px inset rgba(255,255,255,.5)',
    borderTop: '6px inset rgba(255,255,255,.5)',
}

return (
<button className={retroButtonClasses} style={retroButtonStyles}>
    {context}
</button>
);
}

And I'm using it in my Landing component like this:

// Landing.tsx

import React from 'react'
import RetroButton from '@/components/button'

const Landing = () => {
  return (
    <div>
        <RetroButton color='green' context='select' />
        <RetroButton color='red' context='play' />
    </div>
  )
}

export default Landing

I've also set up the necessary Tailwind CSS configurations, but the button's color doesn't change. What am I missing?

1 Answer 1

5

This is how Tailwind handles Dynamic CSS. Unless you have all the classes safe-listed, or on another component somewhere else on the page, the class may not be included in the compiled Tailwind CSS file.

In the docs, they provide a bunch of examples of what to do, and what not to do.

function Button({ color, children }) {
  const colorVariants = {
    red: 'bg-red-retro hover:bg-red-retro-hover focus:bg-red-retro-hover',
    green: 'bg-green-retro hover:bg-green-retro-hover focus:bg-green-retro-hover',
    grey: 'bg-grey-retro hover:bg-grey-retro-hover focus:bg-grey-retro-hover',
  }

const retroButtonClasses = `box-border border-b-6 border-x-6 border-gray-800 
                            text-white text-lg cursor-pointer inline-block m-4 
                            min-w-48 p-2 uppercase`;

  return (
    <button className={`${colorVariants[color]} ${retroButtonClasses}`} 
      style={retroButtonStyles}>
      {context}
    </button>
  )
}

Dynamic class names

The most important implication of how Tailwind extracts class names is that it will only find classes that exist as complete unbroken strings in your source files.

If you use string interpolation or concatenate partial class names together, Tailwind will not find them and therefore will not generate the corresponding CSS:

Don’t construct class names dynamically

// do not do this 
<div class="text-{{ error ? 'red' : 'green' }}-600"></div>

In the example above, the strings text-red-600 and text-green-600 do not exist, so Tailwind will not generate those classes.

Instead, make sure any class names you’re using exist in full:

Always use complete class names

// do this
<div class="{{ error ? 'text-red-600' : 'text-green-600' }}"></div>

If you’re using a component library like React or Vue, this means you shouldn’t use props to dynamically construct classes:

Don’t use props to build class names dynamically

// don't do this
function Button({ color, children }) {
  return (
    <button className={`bg-${color}-600 hover:bg-${color}-500 ...`}>
      {children}
    </button>
  )
}

Instead, map props to complete class names that are statically detectable at build-time:

Always map props to static class names

// do this
function Button({ color, children }) {
  const colorVariants = {
    blue: 'bg-blue-600 hover:bg-blue-500',
    red: 'bg-red-600 hover:bg-red-500',
  }

  return (
    <button className={`${colorVariants[color]} ...`}>
      {children}
    </button>
  )
}

This has the added benefit of letting you map different prop values to different color shades for example:

// do this
function Button({ color, children }) {
  const colorVariants = {
    blue: 'bg-blue-600 hover:bg-blue-500 text-white',
    red: 'bg-red-500 hover:bg-red-400 text-white',
    yellow: 'bg-yellow-300 hover:bg-yellow-400 text-black',
  }

  return (
    <button className={`${colorVariants[color]} ...`}>
      {children}
    </button>
  )
}

As long as you always use complete class names in your code, Tailwind will generate all of your CSS perfectly every time.

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