32

Dart, Google's new web language, says it supports outputting to JavaScript.

What does a simple conversion look like?

  • Do you mean "how does it convert from Dart to JS" or do you mean "What does the emitted JS look like"? In either case, reading their FAQ or Documentation is probably more effective than asking here. – g.d.d.c Oct 10 '11 at 16:08
  • what does it look like once it is emitted. – Daniel A. White Oct 10 '11 at 16:28
  • @g.d.d.c - there isnt any examples of what it actually looks like. – Daniel A. White Oct 10 '11 at 16:29
46
main() {
      print('Hello, Dart!');
}

When compiled with dart2js (as of 2013-04-26) (see note at bottom) it is converted into:

// Generated by dart2js, the Dart to JavaScript compiler.
// The code supports the following hooks:
// dartPrint(message)   - if this function is defined it is called
//                        instead of the Dart [print] method.
// dartMainRunner(main) - if this function is defined, the Dart [main]
//                        method will not be invoked directly.
//                        Instead, a closure that will invoke [main] is
//                        passed to [dartMainRunner].
function Isolate() {}
init();

var $ = Isolate.$isolateProperties;
// Bound closures
$.Primitives_printString = function(string) {
  if (typeof dartPrint == "function") {
    dartPrint(string);
    return;
  }
  if (typeof window == "object") {
    if (typeof console == "object")
      console.log(string);
    return;
  }
  if (typeof print == "function") {
    print(string);
    return;
  }
  throw "Unable to print message: " + String(string);
};

$.main = function() {
  $.Primitives_printString("Hello, Dart!");
};

$.String = {builtin$cls: "String"};

var $ = null;
Isolate = Isolate.$finishIsolateConstructor(Isolate);
var $ = new Isolate();
// BEGIN invoke [main].
if (typeof document !== "undefined" && document.readyState !== "complete") {
  document.addEventListener("readystatechange", function () {
    if (document.readyState == "complete") {
      if (typeof dartMainRunner === "function") {
        dartMainRunner(function() { $.main(); });
      } else {
        $.main();
      }
    }
  }, false);
} else {
  if (typeof dartMainRunner === "function") {
    dartMainRunner(function() { $.main(); });
  } else {
    $.main();
  }
}
// END invoke [main].
function init() {
  Isolate.$isolateProperties = {};
  Isolate.$finishIsolateConstructor = function(oldIsolate) {
    var isolateProperties = oldIsolate.$isolateProperties;
    isolateProperties.$currentScript = typeof document == "object" ? document.currentScript || document.scripts[document.scripts.length - 1] : null;
    var isolatePrototype = oldIsolate.prototype;
    var str = "{\n";
    str += "var properties = Isolate.$isolateProperties;\n";
    var hasOwnProperty = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty;
    for (var staticName in isolateProperties) {
      if (hasOwnProperty.call(isolateProperties, staticName)) {
        str += "this." + staticName + "= properties." + staticName + ";\n";
      }
    }
    str += "}\n";
    var newIsolate = new Function(str);
    newIsolate.prototype = isolatePrototype;
    isolatePrototype.constructor = newIsolate;
    newIsolate.$isolateProperties = isolateProperties;
    return newIsolate;
  };
}
//@ sourceMappingURL=out.js.map

Note for posterity: The original answer to this question has been modified to reflect the current state of affairs.

On 2012-05-12 the dart output for Hello World was 18,718 characters.

On 2012-08-29 the output was 1531 characters.

On 2013-04-26, the output was 2642 characters.

dart2js can minify code. Here is an example (as of 2013-04-26)

// Generated by dart2js, the Dart to JavaScript compiler.
function I(){}
init()
var $=I.p
$.ib=function(a){if(typeof dartPrint=="function"){dartPrint(a)
return}if(typeof window=="object"){if(typeof console=="object")console.log(a)
return}if(typeof print=="function"){print(a)
return}throw "Unable to print message: " + String(a)}
$.E2=function(){$.ib("Hello, Dart!")}
$.qU={builtin$cls:"qU"}

var $=null
I = I.$finishIsolateConstructor(I)
var $=new I()
if (typeof document !== "undefined" && document.readyState !== "complete") {
  document.addEventListener("readystatechange", function () {
    if (document.readyState == "complete") {
      if (typeof dartMainRunner === "function") {
        dartMainRunner(function() { $.E2(); });
      } else {
        $.E2();
      }
    }
  }, false);
} else {
  if (typeof dartMainRunner === "function") {
    dartMainRunner(function() { $.E2(); });
  } else {
    $.E2();
  }
}
function init(){I.p={}
I.$finishIsolateConstructor=function(a){var z=a.p
z.$currentScript=typeof document=="object"?document.currentScript||document.scripts[document.scripts.length-1]:null
var y=a.prototype
var x="{\n"
x+="var properties = I.p;\n"
var w=Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty
for(var v in z){if(w.call(z,v)){x+="this."+v+"= properties."+v+";\n"}}x+="}\n"
var u=new Function(x)
u.prototype=y
y.constructor=u
u.p=z
return u}}//@ sourceMappingURL=out.js.map

On 2013-04-26, the minified code was 1386 characters.

  • 12
    The mind boggles. When they say "Converting to JavaScript", do they mean "Include a Dart runtime written in JavaScript with the program"?! – Quentin Oct 10 '11 at 19:23
  • 6
    I'm pretty sure there is a lot of bloat since it's an early preview. They are following the notion that it's better to optimize later. So I'd expect the output to decrease in size, drastically, to only include what is needed. Though I wonder if they need to & are including a lot for on-the-fly code, like something from eval(). – Marshall Oct 10 '11 at 19:26
  • 2
    "I want this to succeed for all our sake" - is JavaScript really that broken? That we need to be saved from it? Are the fundamental flaws previously mentioned by Google actually that fundamental? I have trouble believing it. – Ryan Kinal Oct 11 '11 at 14:14
  • 7
    Dart will be better / smaller than JS in the end. It's not there yet though. In JS if you want to use a library like jQuery you need to include the entire library even if your only using a few functions from it. Dart will be MUCH better at being able to analyze usage and create a package from all of your code that only contains what you need from all the libraries that you used. Even the best JS compressors will never have the level of understanding about your code to be able to do as good of a job. So just be patient. :-) – Eric J. Smith Apr 23 '12 at 16:33
  • 4
    I've just edited this answer to reflect reality on 2012-05-12 – Seth Ladd May 12 '12 at 13:42
10

The output of the Dart->JavaScript compiler is a moving target. The first release (technical preview) didn't do a lot of tree shaking and was thus pretty big. The new (experimental) frog compiler is much better in this respect (David Chandler's blog), but I expect DartC to improve considerably too.

  • 4
    As an update, frog will be replaced by dart2js and dartc is now just an analyzer (no longer a compiler) – Seth Ladd May 12 '12 at 13:38

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