256

Is there a built-in or standard library method in Python to calculate the arithmetic mean (one type of average) of a list of numbers?

  • Average is ambiguous - mode and median are also commonly-used averages – jtlz2 Jun 11 '18 at 8:13
  • Mode and median are other measures of central tendency. They are not averages. The mode is the most common value seen in a data set and is not necessarily unique. The median is the value that represents the center of the data points. As the question implies, there are a few different types of averages, but all are different from median and mode calculations. purplemath.com/modules/meanmode.htm – Jarom Aug 1 '18 at 4:48
  • @Jarom That link disagrees with you: 'Mean, median, and mode are three kinds of "averages"' – Marcelo Cantos Feb 7 at 3:39

12 Answers 12

278

I am not aware of anything in the standard library. However, you could use something like:

def mean(numbers):
    return float(sum(numbers)) / max(len(numbers), 1)

>>> mean([1,2,3,4])
2.5
>>> mean([])
0.0

In numpy, there's numpy.mean().

  • 20
    A common thing is to consider that the average of [] is 0, which can be done by float(sum(l))/max(len(l),1). – yo' Feb 12 '15 at 23:18
  • 8
    PEP 8 says that l is a bad variable name because it looks so much like 1. Also, I would use if l rather than if len(l) > 0. See here – zondo Apr 13 '16 at 22:40
  • 1
    Why have you called max? – 1 -_- Jul 25 '17 at 6:41
  • 3
    See the question above: To avoid division by zero ( for [] ) – Simon Fakir Jul 27 '17 at 11:05
  • 5
    Empty lists have no mean. Please don't pretend they do. – Marcelo Cantos Feb 7 at 3:35
191

NumPy has a numpy.mean which is an arithmetic mean. Usage is as simple as this:

>>> import numpy
>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> numpy.mean(a)
2.3333333333333335
  • 6
    numpy is a nightmare to install in a virtualenv. You should really consider not using this lib – vcarel Dec 22 '14 at 17:19
  • 45
    @vcarel: "numpy is a nightmare to install in a virtualenv". I'm not sure why you say this. It used to be the case, but for the last year or more it's been very easy. – user227667 Apr 1 '15 at 17:14
  • 5
    I must second this comment. I'm currently using numpy in a virtualenv in OSX, and there is absolutely no problem (currently using CPython 3.5). – Juan Carlos Coto Oct 29 '15 at 22:31
  • 4
    With continuous integration systems like Travis CI, installing numpy takes several extra minutes. If quick and light build is valuable to you, and you need only the mean, consider. – Akseli Palén Mar 7 '16 at 11:36
  • 2
    @AkseliPalén virtual environments on Travis CI can use a numpy installed via apt-get using the system site packages. This may be quick enough to use even if one only needs a mean. – Bengt Mar 25 '16 at 11:40
175

Use statistics.mean:

import statistics
print(statistics.mean([1,2,4])) # 2.3333333333333335

It's available since Python 3.4. For 3.1-3.3 users, an old version of the module is available on PyPI under the name stats. Just change statistics to stats.

  • 2
    Note that this is extremely slow when compared to the other solutions. Compare timeit("numpy.mean(vec)), timeit("sum(vec)/len(vec)") and timeit("statistics.mean(vec)") - the latter is slower than the others by a huge factor (>100 in some cases on my PC). This appears to be due to a particularly precise implementation of the sum operator in statistics, see PEP and Code. Not sure about the reason for the large performance difference between statistics._sum and numpy.sum, though. – jhin May 27 '16 at 13:45
  • 8
    @jhin this is because the statistics.mean tries to be correct. It calculates correctly the mean of [1e50, 1, -1e50] * 1000. – Antti Haapala Aug 27 '16 at 6:17
  • 1
    statistics.mean will also accept a generator expression of values, which all solutions that use len() for the divisor will choke on. – PaulMcG Aug 28 '18 at 1:25
54

You don't even need numpy or scipy...

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
>>> print(sum(a) / len(a))
3
  • 23
    then mean([2,3]) would give 2. be careful with floats. Better use float(sum(l))/len(l). Better still, be careful to check if the list is empty. – jesusiniesta Oct 25 '13 at 22:33
  • 13
    @jesusiniesta except in python3, where division does what it is intended to do : divide – yota Jan 10 '14 at 14:29
  • 11
    And in Python 2.2+ if you from __future__ import division at the top of your program – spiffytech Feb 14 '14 at 2:25
  • What about big numbers and overflow? – obayhan Oct 20 '15 at 11:52
  • What about a = list()? The proposed code results in ZeroDivisionError. – Ioannis Filippidis Sep 7 '16 at 12:04
8

Use scipy:

import scipy;
a=[1,2,4];
print(scipy.mean(a));
5

Instead of casting to float you can do following

def mean(nums):
    return sum(nums, 0.0) / len(nums)

or using lambda

mean = lambda nums: sum(nums, 0.0) / len(nums)
2
from statistics import mean
avarage=mean(your_list)

for example

from statistics import mean

my_list=[5,2,3,2]
avarage=mean(my_list)
print(avarage)

and result is

3.0
1
def avg(l):
    """uses floating-point division."""
    return sum(l) / float(len(l))

Examples:

l1 = [3,5,14,2,5,36,4,3]
l2 = [0,0,0]

print(avg(l1)) # 9.0
print(avg(l2)) # 0.0
1
def list_mean(nums):
    sumof = 0
    num_of = len(nums)
    mean = 0
    for i in nums:
        sumof += i
    mean = sumof / num_of
    return float(mean)
0

I always supposed avg is omitted from the builtins/stdlib because it is as simple as

sum(L)/len(L) # L is some list

and any caveats would be addressed in caller code for local usage already.

Notable caveats:

  1. non-float result: in python2, 9/4 is 2. to resolve, use float(sum(L))/len(L) or from __future__ import division

  2. division by zero: the list may be empty. to resolve:

    if not L:
        raise WhateverYouWantError("foo")
    avg = float(sum(L))/len(L)
    
0

The proper answer to your question is to use statistics.mean. But for fun, here is a version of mean that does not use the len() function, so it (like statistics.mean) can be used on generators, which do not support len():

from functools import reduce
from operator import truediv
def ave(seq):
    return truediv(*reduce(lambda a, b: (a[0] + b[1], b[0]), 
                           enumerate(seq, start=1), 
                           (0, 0)))
-2

Others already posted very good answers, but some people might still be looking for a classic way to find Mean(avg), so here I post this (code tested in Python 3.6):

def meanmanual(listt):

mean = 0
lsum = 0
lenoflist = len(listt)

for i in listt:
    lsum += i

mean = lsum / lenoflist
return float(mean)

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
meanmanual(a)

Answer: 3.5

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