1

I'm trying to implement a generic setter for a container of Foo objects.

I do not understand why clang complains about this code given that:

  1. you can totally pass a std::string or literal to a function that takes const std::string & as an argument

  2. the template specialization, which does compile and have the expected behavior, has the exact same code as the templated version.

Any clue what I'm doing wrong?

Thanks.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

class Foo
{
  protected:
    int _x;
    std::string _name;

  public:
    void set_x(int x) { _x = x; }
    void set_name(const std::string & name) { _name = name; }

    int x() const { return _x; }
    std::string name() const { return _name; }
};

template <typename T, typename Container>
void set_property(Container & container, const T & value, void (Foo::*setter)(T))
{
    for (auto & element : container)
        (element.*setter)(value);
}

// Uncomment this to succeed. 
//
//template <typename Container>
//void set_property(Container & container, const std::string & value, void (Foo::*setter)(const //std::string &))
//{
//    for (auto & element : container)
//        (element.*setter)(value);
//}

int main(void)
{
    int x = 42;
    std::string name = "foo";

    // Initialization.
    std::vector<Foo> foos(10);
    for (auto & foo : foos)
    {
        foo.set_x(x);
        foo.set_name(name);
    }

    x = 17;
    name = "bar";

    // Set properties.
    set_property(foos, x, &Foo::set_x);
    set_property(foos, name, &Foo::set_name);

    std::cout << "x: " << foos[0].x() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "name: " << foos[0].name() << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

clang error:

❯❯  g++ --std=c++20 foo.cpp &&./a.out
foo.cpp:44:5: error: no matching function for call to 'set_property'
    set_property(foos, name, &Foo::set_name);
    ^~~~~~~~~~~~
foo.cpp:20:6: note: candidate template ignored: deduced conflicting types for parameter 'T' ('std::string' (aka 'basic_string<char>') vs. 'const std::string &' (aka 'const basic_string<char> &'))
void set_property(Container & container, const T & value, void (Foo::*setter)(T))
     ^
1 error generated.
2
  • 2
    The compiler tells you the problem: For the second parameter T must be std::string, but for the setter T must be const std::string&.
    – BoP
    Commented Sep 26, 2023 at 19:41
  • Yes... So that's my point. How come it complains? In principle, I should be able to pass a string to a function that accepts const std::string &, in the exact same fashion that I pass an int to a function that accepts a const int &
    – duncan
    Commented Sep 26, 2023 at 19:51

2 Answers 2

0

If a template parameter is deduced more than once, it must match exactly throughout the set.

You have:

template <typename T, typename Container>
void set_property(Container & container, const T & value, void (Foo::*setter)(T))

Note how T is used in two separate function parameters, value and setter.

Now, when you call

set_property(foos, name, &Foo::set_name);

T is deduced twice, from name and separately from set_name. The two Ts should be exactly the same. But they are not, name says it must be std::string while set_name says it must be const std::string&.

You are saying "oh but it's OK to use std::string& where const std::string&". This is true, but irrelevant. The two Ts must be the same. Not almost the same, not compatible in some fashion, but the same.

If you uncomment the overload (it's not a specialization) where std::string is hard-coded, you are good to go exactly because now there are no conflicting deductions.

1
  • I see... (Note: you're totally right about the "not a specialization" thing)
    – duncan
    Commented Sep 26, 2023 at 20:09
0

So, thanks to @n-m-could-be-an-ai, I came up with this solution

Thanks a lot

Cheers

Updated solution after @Eugene comment

class Foo
{
  protected:
    int _x;
    std::string _name;

  public:
    void set_x(int x) { _x = x; }
    void set_name(const std::string & name) { _name = name; }

    int x() const { return _x; }
    std::string name() const { return _name; }
};

template <typename Container, typename T, typename Setter>
void container_set(Container & container, const T & value, Setter setter, std::type_identity_t<const T> * = nullptr)
{
    for (auto & foo : container)
    {
        (foo.*setter)(value);
    }
}


4
  • Instead of duplicating the function, you can put its last argument in non-deduced context. If you are using C++20, there is a standard thing for it: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/type_identity. If not, it is trivial to make your own type_identity.
    – Eugene
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 4:30
  • @Eugene. Correct. Thanks a lot. Although I have to admit that this solution was generated by Copilot and contains a decent amount of what looks like dark magic to me...
    – duncan
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 13:08
  • 1
    The solution copilot gave you is typical bot garbage – it might "work", but that's not what Eugene was suggesting and wouldn't pass code review
    – ildjarn
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 15:24
  • If you remove the non-nonsensical , std::type_identity_t<const T> * = nullptr, then the remaining is yet another solution - having a separate template argument for the type of your member function.
    – Eugene
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 17:02

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