61

I want to split a text with comma , not space in for foo in list. Suppose I have a CSV file CSV_File with following text inside it:

Hello,World,Questions,Answers,bash shell,script
...

I used following code to split it into several words:

for word in $(cat CSV_File | sed -n 1'p' | tr ',' '\n')
do echo $word
done

It prints:

Hello
World
Questions
Answers
bash
shell
script

But I want it to split the text by commas not spaces:

Hello
World
Questions
Answers
bash shell
script

How can I achieve this in bash?

1
  • 4
    @Carl Could you please provide an example of using awk?
    – Eng.Fouad
    Oct 10, 2011 at 20:40

9 Answers 9

62

Set IFS to ,:

sorin@sorin:~$ IFS=',' ;for i in `echo "Hello,World,Questions,Answers,bash shell,script"`; do echo $i; done
Hello
World
Questions
Answers
bash shell
script
sorin@sorin:~$ 
3
  • Nice! I forgot all about the IFS env variable!
    – chown
    Oct 10, 2011 at 20:56
  • 2
    To use this in a script you should restore the IFS variable to the previous value. See Andrew Newdigate's answer.
    – clime
    May 6, 2016 at 9:12
  • 1
    @Sorin: By "To use this in a script" I mean that more code is expected than just this so you want to reset IFS to avoid any unexpected behavior. Implication of IFS seems to be quite extensive so better be lazy than unclear. Btw. if you run your command like tin your answer, it will change IFS for the the current environment and you can really easily forget that and then wonder why your shell behaves so weird.
    – clime
    May 6, 2016 at 11:43
61

Using a subshell substitution to parse the words undoes all the work you are doing to put spaces together.

Try instead:

cat CSV_file | sed -n 1'p' | tr ',' '\n' | while read word; do
    echo $word
done

That also increases parallelism. Using a subshell as in your question forces the entire subshell process to finish before you can start iterating over the answers. Piping to a subshell (as in my answer) lets them work in parallel. This matters only if you have many lines in the file, of course.

4
  • 1
    Yea, this is way better then what I had suggested. +1 for the l33t bash skills mkj :)
    – chown
    Oct 10, 2011 at 20:49
  • 1
    Don't even need the while loop. Aug 12, 2014 at 23:18
  • 1
    Don't need the while loop as it stands, but I was understanding the invocation of echo as a proxy for some more interesting command; that is, that the OP wanted the multi-word CSV content in a shell variable to use with some other arbitrary command. That's why I used read to demonstrate how you get the content into a shell variable.
    – mkj
    Dec 18, 2014 at 20:27
  • 1
    Note that this won't work as expected if the input contains newlines (it will then be split on the commas and the newlines originally appearing in the input, i.e. a,b\nc,d will be split in 4 fields instead of desired 3). With Bash I'd recommend using single-command-scoped IFS setting combined with read -a, or read -d (cf. proper IFS setting in Bash), but for POSIX shells I find substring processing to be the only clean and fool-proof solution.
    – desseim
    Jan 28, 2021 at 8:38
23

I think the canonical method is:

while IFS=, read field1 field2 field3 field4 field5 field6; do 
  do stuff
done < CSV.file

If you don't know or don't care about how many fields there are:

IFS=,
while read line; do
  # split into an array
  field=( $line )
  for word in "${field[@]}"; do echo "$word"; done

  # or use the positional parameters
  set -- $line
  for word in "$@"; do echo "$word"; done

done < CSV.file
5
  • Very handy to be able to refer to specific fields by name
    – HXCaine
    Nov 20, 2012 at 1:35
  • @glenn-jackman You are correct, canonical UNIX would use your first method. The second one only works with a modern implementation of bash or zsh. Jan 7, 2014 at 1:13
  • 1
    bash's read command has a -a option to read the words in the line into an array: while read -a words; do for word in "${words[@]}" ... Jan 7, 2014 at 1:37
  • And at least in the version I am using, reading n fields when one record has an extra comma does not fall over, but puts in the last field the two values with the comma in the middle.
    – zsalya
    Sep 29, 2022 at 18:00
  • yes, IFS=, read a b <<<"1,2,3" will set variable b to the string 2,3 Sep 29, 2022 at 18:24
12
kent$  echo "Hello,World,Questions,Answers,bash shell,script"|awk -F, '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++)print $i}'
Hello
World
Questions
Answers
bash shell
script
3
  • 1
    I'm assuming that echo $word isn't actually the real thing that needs to be done with $word. In which case, your awk expession is another way to do the sed and tr in the original question. I think that Eng.Fouad wants the value, with the space, in a shell variable to do something else with.
    – mkj
    Oct 10, 2011 at 20:53
  • @mkj This solution is ok for further usage as shell variable, e.g.: FOO="Hello,World,Questions,Answers,bash shell,script"; BOO=$(echo $FOO | awk -F, '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++)print $i}'); for B in $BOO; do echo "<$B>"; done Sep 27, 2017 at 9:38
  • @RomanChernyatchik The loop over $BOO there yields separate variables for "bash" and "shell" and so wouldn't work as the OP intended
    – Peter Berg
    Feb 7, 2018 at 14:30
11

Create a bash function

split_on_commas() {
  local IFS=,
  local WORD_LIST=($1)
  for word in "${WORD_LIST[@]}"; do
    echo "$word"
  done
}

split_on_commas "this,is a,list" | while read item; do
  # Custom logic goes here
  echo Item: ${item}
done

... this generates the following output:

Item: this
Item: is a
Item: list

(Note, this answer has been updated according to some feedback)

5
  • Weird. Any idea why that's happening? Jul 21, 2014 at 14:46
  • The side effects are explained here superuser.com/questions/781766/ifs-separated-items-in-loop
    – Val
    Jul 21, 2014 at 19:57
  • 1
    To avoid the "side effects", first store IFS var somewhere OLDIFS=$IFS, then execute IFS=, sentences1=($sentences) and finally restore IFS: IFS=$OLDIFS. Otherwise, this is the answer I was searching for. Thanks.
    – clime
    May 6, 2016 at 9:07
  • @clime and Val, I've updated my answer to take your feedback into account. It seems to work well, but let me know what you think. May 6, 2016 at 12:48
  • I think that your post is too complicated now. It was enough to fix the original code snippet and make a give credits to commentators by a small note in the end ;). But anyway, nothing is perfect.
    – clime
    May 6, 2016 at 15:02
5

Read: http://linuxmanpages.com/man1/sh.1.php & http://www.gnu.org/s/hello/manual/autoconf/Special-Shell-Variables.html

IFS The Internal Field Separator that is used for word splitting after expansion and to split lines into words with the read builtin command. The default value is ``''.

IFS is a shell environment variable so it will remain unchanged within the context of your Shell script but not otherwise, unless you EXPORT it. ALSO BE AWARE, that IFS will not likely be inherited from your Environment at all: see this gnu post for the reasons and more info on IFS.

You're code written like this:

IFS=","
for word in $(cat tmptest | sed -n 1'p' | tr ',' '\n'); do echo $word; done;

should work, I tested it on command line.

sh-3.2#IFS=","
sh-3.2#for word in $(cat tmptest | sed -n 1'p' | tr ',' '\n'); do echo $word; done;
World
Questions
Answers
bash shell
script
1

You can use:

cat f.csv | sed 's/,/ /g' |  awk '{print $1 " / " $4}'

or

echo "Hello,World,Questions,Answers,bash shell,script" | sed 's/,/ /g' |  awk '{print $1 " / " $4}'

This is the part that replace comma with space

sed 's/,/ /g'
1

Using readarray(mapfile):

$ cat csf
Hello,World,Questions,Answers,bash shell,script

$ readarray -td, arr < csf

$ printf '%s\n' "${arr[@]}"
Hello
World
Questions
Answers
bash shell
script
1
0

For me, use array split is simpler ref

IN="[email protected];[email protected]"
arrIN=(${IN//;/ })
echo ${arrIN[1]}  
1
  • But this one ...,bash shell,... will also be splinted, which is OP wanted to to avoid.
    – Ivan
    Aug 31, 2022 at 7:26

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