40

I hate repeating functions, particularly in Excel formulas. Is there any way that I can avoid something like:

=IF( VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0) > 10, VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0) - 10, VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0) )

[The above is just a simple example of the problem, and not a particular formula that I'm working with.]

39

You could define a name for the VLOOKUP part of the formula.

  1. Highlight the cell that contains this formula
  2. On the Insert menu, go Name, and click Define
  3. Enter a name for your variable (e.g. 'Value')
  4. In the Refers To box, enter your VLOOKUP formula: =VLOOKUP(A1,B:B, 1, 0)
  5. Click Add, and close the dialog
  6. In your original formula, replace the VLOOKUP parts with the name you just defined: =IF( Value > 10, Value - 10, Value )

Step (1) is important here: I guess on the second row, you want Excel to use VLOOKUP(A2,B:B, 1, 0), the third row VLOOKUP(A3,B:B, 1, 0), etc. Step (4) achieves this by using relative references (A1 and B:B), not absolute references ($A$1 and $B:$B).

Note:

  1. For newer Excel versions with the ribbon, go to Formulas ribbon -> Define Name. It's the same after that. Also, to use your name, you can do "Use in Formula", right under Define Name, while editing the formula, or else start typing it, and Excel will suggest the name (credits: Michael Rusch)

  2. Shortened steps: 1. Right click a cell and click Define name... 2. Enter a name and the formula which you want to associate with that name/local variable 3. Use variable (credits: Jens Bodal)

  • 3
    For newer Excel versions with the ribbon, go to Formulas ribbon -> Define Name. It's the same after that. Also, to use your name, you can do "Use in Formula", right under Define Name, while editing the formula, or else start typing it, and Excel will suggest the name. – Michael Rusch Jul 12 '11 at 18:07
  • 6
    Note that each time Excel encounters a name in an Excel formula it evaluates the name. So replacing repeated sub-expressions within a formula using a Name gives you a more concise formula but does not save any calculation time (in fact its slightly slower because Excel needs to find the refersto formula for the name before it can evaluate it). – Charles Williams May 1 '12 at 14:55
  • 1
    Thanks, this was helpful. I think this is basically what Michael was saying but the steps can just be shortened to: 1. Right click a cell and click Define name... 2. Enter a name and the formula which you want to associate with that name/local variable 3. Use variable – Jens Bodal Jul 7 '15 at 16:38
  • In Excel 2016, to define a name for your variables go to the formulas tab and from there you can select name – Josh Dando Nov 2 '18 at 21:37
4

You could store intermediate values in a cell or column (which you could hide if you choose)

C1: = VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0)
D1: = IF(C1 > 10, C1 - 10, C1)
  • 1
    @1owk3y There's no variable being used here. – David Metcalfe Apr 27 '18 at 3:28
2

Not related to variables, your example will also be solved by MOD:

=Mod(VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0);10)
  • 3
    Not quite - subtracting 10 is only the same as Mod 10 if the value is between 10 and 20... But cute idea. – Floris May 2 '13 at 20:51
1

Yes. But not directly.

Simpler way

  • You could post Vlookup() in one cell and use its address in where required. - This is perhaps the only direct way of using variables in Excel.

OR

  • You could define Vlookup(reference)-10 as a wrapper function from within VBE Macros. Press Alt+f12 and use that function
1

Two options:

  • VLOOKUP function in its own cell: =VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0) (in say, C1), then formula referencing C1: =IF( C1 > 10, C1 - 10, C1 )
  • create a UDF:

Function MyFunc(a1, a2, a3, a4)
    Dim v as Variant
    v = Application.WorksheetFunction.VLookup(a1, a2, a3, a4)
    If v > 10 Then
        MyFunc = v - 10
    Else
        MyFunc = v
    End If
End Function
1

Defining a NAME containing the lookup is a neat solution, HOWEVER, it always seems to store the sheet name with the cell reference. However, I think if you delete the sheet name in the '' quotes but leave the "!", it may work.

0

There isn't a way to define a variable in the formula bar of Excel. As a workaround you could place the function in another cell (optionally, hiding the contents or placing it in a separate sheet). Otherwise you could create a VBA function.

0

I know it's a little off-topic, but following up with the solution presented by Jonas Bøhmer, actually I think that MOD is the best solution to your example.

If your intention was to limit the result to one digit, MOD is the best approach to achieve it.

ie. Let's suppose that VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0) returns 23. Your IF formula would simply make this calculation: 23 - 10 and return 13 as the result.

On the other hand, MOD(VLOOKUP(A1, B:B, 1, 0), 10) would divide 23 by 10 and show the remainder: 3.

Back to the main topic, when I need to use a formula that repeats some part, I usually put it on another cell and then hide it as some people already suggested.

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