24

I want to create a Stack in Java, but fix the size. For example, create a new Stack, set the size to 10, then as I push items to the stack it fills up and when it fills up to ten, the last item in the stack is pushed off (removed). I want to use Stack because it uses LIFO and fits my needs very well.

But the setSize() method that Stack inherits from Vector doesn't seem to actually limit the size of the Stack. I think I am missing something about how Stacks work, or maybe Stacks weren't meant to be constrained so it is impossible. Please educate me!

6
  • FYI the setSize method is inherited from Vector, meaning that setSize will cause nulls to be added to fill the new size provided, or existing objects beyond the new size are discarded. You could in theory use this by doing if (stack.size() >= 10) { stack.setSize(10); } whenever you push to the stack, but it would be better to implement your own custom Class.
    – Thor84no
    Oct 11, 2011 at 14:58
  • I tried this originally just to see if it would work. It's odd, but it seems as though when I do the setSize() on the Stack, it reverses the order of the items and truncates them from there. So I always end up with the original 10 items in the stack. Similarly, another quick/dirty way to do it is to (stack.size() >= 10) { stack.remove(0); } The same problem arises where it reverses order, so for some reason the 0 index is the one to remove.
    – koopaking3
    Oct 11, 2011 at 15:35
  • 1
    That probably just means that the underlying implementation actually works that way and the stack methods are returning things to you in reverse order, which makes a lot of sense anyway.
    – Thor84no
    Oct 11, 2011 at 15:36
  • Good point, that is probably exactly what's happening.
    – koopaking3
    Oct 11, 2011 at 16:05
  • setSize() shows that a Stack is not a Vector, rather should contain a Vector and inheritance was not the right decision for implementation.
    – flob
    Oct 11, 2011 at 19:03

7 Answers 7

30

Here is a SizedStack type that extends Stack:

import java.util.Stack;

public class SizedStack<T> extends Stack<T> {
    private int maxSize;

    public SizedStack(int size) {
        super();
        this.maxSize = size;
    }

    @Override
    public T push(T object) {
        //If the stack is too big, remove elements until it's the right size.
        while (this.size() >= maxSize) {
            this.remove(0);
        }
        return super.push(object);
    }
}

Use it like this: Stack<Double> mySizedStack = new SizedStack<Double>(10);. Other than the size, it operates like any other Stack.

5
  • 1
    This is great! I would suggest replacing while (this.size() > maxSize) with if (this.size() == maxSize) so that the size you initialize the SizedStack to will be the actual max size allowed for the stack. Mar 12, 2015 at 0:26
  • 3
    I changed it to while (this.size() >= maxSize) to take care of the off-by-one error you noticed. Thanks. It still should be a while-loop for safety purposes though; what would happen if the size somehow got larger than the maxSize? I know it seems impossible, but bugs are bugs :).
    – calvin
    Mar 16, 2015 at 16:35
  • 2
    I like the thoughtfulness backing up your choice! Good call :D Mar 16, 2015 at 21:28
  • 2
    this is a good answer though it's worth mentioning that it is recommended to use an implementation of the Deque interface rather than the (very) old Stack which is not thread-safe and based on another deprecated class like Vector Feb 21, 2018 at 18:45
  • Vector is not deprecated. It implements List and is actually synchronous. docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/Vector.html
    – calvin
    Apr 5, 2020 at 1:14
6

You can create a very simple stack like this:

public class FixedStack<T>
{
    private T[] stack;
    private int size;
    private int top;

    public FixedStack<T>(int size)
    {
        this.stack = (T[]) new Object[size];
        this.top = -1;
        this.size = size;
    }

    public void push(T obj)
    {
        if (top >= size)
            throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Stack size = " + size);
        stack[++top] = obj;
    }

    public T pop()
    {
        if (top < 0) throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();
        T obj = stack[top--];
        stack[top + 1] = null;
        return obj;
    }

    public int size()
    {
        return size;
    }

    public int elements()
    {
        return top + 1;
    }
}
3
  • I ended up doing something akin to this. Thanks!
    – koopaking3
    Oct 11, 2011 at 15:52
  • There's a potential here for a memory leak.
    – mre
    Oct 11, 2011 at 15:52
  • 1
    @mre: Ok. Hold on. I'll fix. Done. Is this what you meant? Oct 11, 2011 at 15:53
1

A pure stack would not limit its size, as for many of the problems stacks solve you don't know how many elements you are going to need.

You could write a custom stack that implements the needs you described. However, you will break LIFO if you do. If the max size is met, and you push something new on the stack, you just lose the previously added item. So if you then start popping items off your stack, you'll miss some.

1

This is not impossible :) You just have to provide your own implementation.

I would start with a RingBuffer like this and adjust it accordingly.

0

You can subclass Stack and override the appropriate method(s) to implement this custom behavior. And make sure to give it a clear name (e.g. FixedStack).

0

What you need is a double-ended queue like LinkedList. This wouldn't automatically drop elements at the front though, but by subclassing/decorating it you could add that functionality.

0

You can use LinkedHashMap and override its removeEldestEntry method:

public class FixedStack extends LinkedHashMap<Long, String> {

    private final int capacity;

    public FixedStack(int capacity) {
        this.capacity = capacity;
    }

    @Override
    protected boolean removeEldestEntry(final Map.Entry<Long, String> eldest) {
        return super.size() > capacity;
    }
}

And to test it:

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        FixedStack stack = new FixedStack(10);

        long added = 0;
        for (Locale locale : Locale.getAvailableLocales()) {
            if (locale.getDisplayCountry().length() > 0) {
                stack.put(added, locale.getDisplayCountry());
                System.out.println(locale.getDisplayCountry());
                added++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(String.format(">>>>>>>>> %s added",
                added));
        Iterator<Entry<Long, String>> iterator = stack.entrySet().iterator();
        while (iterator.hasNext()) {
            System.out.println(iterator.next().getValue());
        }
    }

You just have to decide what you want to use as the key, I used a simple counter in the example.

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