22

Okay, simple template question. Say I define my template class something like this:

template<typename T>
class foo {
public:
    foo(T const& first, T const& second) : first(first), second(second) {}

    template<typename C>
    void bar(C& container, T const& baz) {
        //...
    }
private:
    T first;
    T second;
}

The question is about my bar function... I need it to be able to use a standard container of some sort, which is why I included the template/typename C part, to define that container type. But apparently that's not the right way to do it, since my test class then complains that:

error: 'bar' was not declared in this scope

So how would I go about implementing my bar function the proper way? That is, as a function of my template class, with an arbitrary container type... the rest of my template class works fine (has other functions that don't result in an error), it's just that one function that's problematic.

EDIT: Okay, so the specific function (bar) is an eraseInRange function, that erases all elements in a specified range:

void eraseInRange(C& container, T const& firstElement, T const& secondElement) {...}

And an example of how it would be used would be:

eraseInRange(v, 7, 19);

where v is a vector in this case.

EDIT 2: Silly me! I was supposed to declare the function outside of my class, not in it... pretty frustrating mistake to be making. Anyways, thanks everyone for the help, though the problem was a little different, the information did help me construct the function, since after finding my original problem, I did get some other pleasant errors. So thank you!

  • Please provide an example of how you are using the foo<T> class and the foot<T>::bar<C> method. The problem likely is in your using code. – Michael Price Oct 11 '11 at 15:27
  • 2
    The code you posted compiles fine. Where are you actually having the problem? – sth Oct 11 '11 at 15:29
  • Your test class does not happen to inherit from foo? See parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/templates.html#faq-35.19 – UncleBens Oct 11 '11 at 15:33
  • I hope my edit clears it up a little? The test class was provided for the exercise, so I shouldn't change how the method is being called, but it's complaining about the eraseInRange mehtod not being declared... – Fault Oct 11 '11 at 15:36
  • 1
    Since we don't know what your test driver is doing, we can't help much. Does the class work for you, e.g. if you use eraseInRange yourself with a vector? – Luc Danton Oct 11 '11 at 16:18
36


Traits solution.

Generalize not more than needed, and not less.

In some cases that solution might not be enough as it will match any template with such signature (e.g. shared_ptr), in which case you could make use of type_traits, very much like duck-typing (templates are duck typed in general).

#include <type_traits>

// Helper to determine whether there's a const_iterator for T.
template<typename T>
struct has_const_iterator
{
private:
    template<typename C> static char test(typename C::const_iterator*);
    template<typename C> static int  test(...);
public:
    enum { value = sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(char) };
};


// bar() is defined for Containers that define const_iterator as well
// as value_type.
template <typename Container>
typename std::enable_if<has_const_iterator<Container>::value,
                        void>::type
bar(const Container &c, typename Container::value_type const & t)
{
  // Note: no extra check needed for value_type, the check comes for
  //       free in the function signature already.
}


template <typename T>
class DoesNotHaveConstIterator {};

#include <vector>
int main () {
    std::vector<float> c;
    bar (c, 1.2f);

    DoesNotHaveConstIterator<float> b;
    bar (b, 1.2f); // correctly fails to compile
}

A good template usually does not artificially restrict the kind of types for which they are valid (why should they?). But imagine in the example above you need to have access to an objects const_iterator, then you can use SFINAE and type_traits to put those constraints on your function.


Or just to as the standard library does

Generalize not more than needed, and not less.

template <typename Iter>
void bar (Iter it, Iter end) {
    for (; it!=end; ++it) { /*...*/ }
}

#include <vector>
int main () {
    std::vector<float> c;
    bar (c.begin(), c.end());
}

For more such examples, look into <algorithm>.

This approach's strength is its simplicity and is based on concepts like ForwardIterator. It will even work for arrays. If you want to report errors right in the signature, you can combine it with traits.


std containers with signature like std::vector (not recommended)

The simplest solution is approximated by Kerrek SB already, though it is invalid C++. The corrected variant goes like so:

#include <memory> // for std::allocator
template <template <typename, typename> class Container, 
          typename Value,
          typename Allocator=std::allocator<Value> >
void bar(const Container<Value, Allocator> & c, const Value & t)
{
  //
}

However: this will only work for containers that have exactly two template type arguments, so will fail miserably for std::map (thanks Luc Danton).


Any kind of secondary template arguments (not recommended)

The corrected version for any secondary parameter count is as follows:

#include <memory> // for std::allocator<>

template <template <typename, typename...> class Container, 
          typename Value,
          typename... AddParams >
void bar(const Container<Value, AddParams...> & c, const Value & t)
{
  //
}

template <typename T>
class OneParameterVector {};

#include <vector>
int main () {
    OneParameterVector<float> b;
    bar (b, 1.2f);
    std::vector<float> c;
    bar (c, 1.2f);
}

However: this will still fail for non-template containers (thanks Luc Danton).

  • 2
    What does any of this have to do with error: 'bar' was not declared in this scope? Sorry, but OP's code appears to be the correct. I see lots of template magic here, but none of this is how one normally accepts a container in a function template. – UncleBens Oct 11 '11 at 16:14
  • 3
    What happened to generic programming? template<typename Container> void foo(Container& c) { /* use typename Container::value_type as needed etc. */ ... – Luc Danton Oct 11 '11 at 16:16
  • 1
    Just to note: ensuring at compile-time that Container::value_type and T are the same (or that Container is a container) is the job for a static assertion. Compare the error diagnostics that you get from innocent mistakes: ideone.com/gVVFU (how helpful is that!) and ideone.com/ILIGP (with the where and the why). What you see above is only advisable if you are going to provide an overload where those types are not the same, or where the first argument is not a container. – UncleBens Oct 11 '11 at 17:35
  • 1
    @Luc: Nothing happened, and that's still the best solution (see the part on trait checking in my answer). Me, I was tempted by the prospect of having a real sentence published that uses the word "template" four times... – Kerrek SB Oct 11 '11 at 18:25
  • @UncleBens: 0) Question was So how would I go about implementing my bar function the proper way?. 1) Define "normally". The standard library normally works on iterator pairs (my fourth proposal). E.g. std::count's signature: count ( ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last, const T& value );. – Sebastian Mach Oct 13 '11 at 11:58
6

Make the template templated on a template template parameter:

template <template <typename, typename...> class Container>
void bar(const Container<T> & c, const T & t)
{
  //
}

If you don't have C++11, then you can't use variadic templates, and you have to provide as many template parameters as your container takes. For example, for a sequence container you might need two:

template <template <typename, typename> class Container, typename Alloc>
void bar(const Container<T, Alloc> & c, const T & t);

Or, if you only want to allow allocators which are themselves template instances:

template <template <typename, typename> class Container, template <typename> class Alloc>
void bar(const Container<T, Alloc<T> > & c, const T & t);

As I suggested in the comments, I would personally prefer to make the entire container a templated type and use traits to check if it's valid. Something like this:

template <typename Container>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<typename Container::value_type, T>::value, void>::type
bar(const Container & c, const T & t);

This is more flexible since the container can now be anything that exposes the value_type member type. More sophisticated traits for checking for member functions and iterators can be conceived of; for example, the pretty printer implements a few of those.

  • Any rationale why that should work. (In general, this should be very unusual thing to do...) – UncleBens Oct 11 '11 at 15:34
  • @UncleBens: What do you mean? You can match all sorts of things with templates. I'm not saying this is the best idea (personally, I'd probably prefer for a trait check of typename C::value_type), but hey, it's an option. – Kerrek SB Oct 11 '11 at 15:36
  • But where do you unfold the pack? – Sebastian Mach Oct 11 '11 at 15:42
  • 3
    How does this explain why the original code fails (of course, the question doesn't provide enough information) and why this can be expected to succeed? It is not even clear from the question that T is supposed to be C::value_type. - Without this explanation, this sounds like woodoo programming to me. – UncleBens Oct 11 '11 at 15:46
  • 1
    @CaptainGiraffe: Traits are preferable because they allow more general containers. With the template template parameter, you have to anticipate the correct template signature. With a trait check, you can have entirely arbitrary containers, as long as they expose value_type. – Kerrek SB Oct 11 '11 at 15:52
0

Here's the latest and expanded version of this answer and significant improvement over answer by Sabastian.

The idea is to define all traits of STL containers. Unfortunately, this gets tricky very fast and fortunately lot of people have worked on tuning this code. These traits are reusable so just copy and past below code in file called type_utils.hpp (feel free to change these names):

//put this in type_utils.hpp 
#ifndef commn_utils_type_utils_hpp
#define commn_utils_type_utils_hpp

#include <type_traits>
#include <valarray>

namespace common_utils { namespace type_utils {
    //from: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/louisdx/cxx-prettyprint/master/prettyprint.hpp
    //also see https://gist.github.com/louisdx/1076849
    namespace detail
    {
        // SFINAE type trait to detect whether T::const_iterator exists.

        struct sfinae_base
        {
            using yes = char;
            using no  = yes[2];
        };

        template <typename T>
        struct has_const_iterator : private sfinae_base
        {
        private:
            template <typename C> static yes & test(typename C::const_iterator*);
            template <typename C> static no  & test(...);
        public:
            static const bool value = sizeof(test<T>(nullptr)) == sizeof(yes);
            using type =  T;

            void dummy(); //for GCC to supress -Wctor-dtor-privacy
        };

        template <typename T>
        struct has_begin_end : private sfinae_base
        {
        private:
            template <typename C>
            static yes & f(typename std::enable_if<
                std::is_same<decltype(static_cast<typename C::const_iterator(C::*)() const>(&C::begin)),
                             typename C::const_iterator(C::*)() const>::value>::type *);

            template <typename C> static no & f(...);

            template <typename C>
            static yes & g(typename std::enable_if<
                std::is_same<decltype(static_cast<typename C::const_iterator(C::*)() const>(&C::end)),
                             typename C::const_iterator(C::*)() const>::value, void>::type*);

            template <typename C> static no & g(...);

        public:
            static bool const beg_value = sizeof(f<T>(nullptr)) == sizeof(yes);
            static bool const end_value = sizeof(g<T>(nullptr)) == sizeof(yes);

            void dummy(); //for GCC to supress -Wctor-dtor-privacy
        };

    }  // namespace detail

    // Basic is_container template; specialize to derive from std::true_type for all desired container types

    template <typename T>
    struct is_container : public std::integral_constant<bool,
                                                        detail::has_const_iterator<T>::value &&
                                                        detail::has_begin_end<T>::beg_value  &&
                                                        detail::has_begin_end<T>::end_value> { };

    template <typename T, std::size_t N>
    struct is_container<T[N]> : std::true_type { };

    template <std::size_t N>
    struct is_container<char[N]> : std::false_type { };

    template <typename T>
    struct is_container<std::valarray<T>> : std::true_type { };

    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    struct is_container<std::pair<T1, T2>> : std::true_type { };

    template <typename ...Args>
    struct is_container<std::tuple<Args...>> : std::true_type { };

}}  //namespace
#endif

Now you can use these traits to make sure our code only accepts container types. For example, you can implement append function that appends one vector to another like this:

#include "type_utils.hpp"

template<typename Container>
static typename std::enable_if<type_utils::is_container<Container>::value, void>::type
append(Container& to, const Container& from)
{
    using std::begin;
    using std::end;
    to.insert(end(to), begin(from), end(from));
}

Notice that I'm using begin() and end() from std namespace just to be sure we have iterator behavior. For more explanation see my blog post.

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