22

How to return a boolean if the record has been updated on the database?

Example:

try {
  $SQL = "UPDATE addressbook SET valid = '0' WHERE id = :id";
  $query = $this->db->prepare($SQL);
  $query->bindValue(":id", $id);
  $query->execute();

  //How do I know if record has been updated? 
} catch (PDOException $e) {
  $j['success'] = 'false';
  echo json_encode($j);
  return;
}
  • 2
    By "updated" do you simply mean that your update statement succeeded or are you looking for cases where valid was not 0 prior to the update? – Joe Stefanelli Oct 11 '11 at 19:14
41

You can use:

PDOStatement::rowCount() returns the number of rows affected by the last DELETE, INSERT, or UPDATE statement executed by the corresponding PDOStatement object.

If the last SQL statement executed by the associated PDOStatement was a SELECT statement, some databases may return the number of rows returned by that statement. However, this behaviour is not guaranteed for all databases and should not be relied on for portable applications.

PDOStatement::rowCount (PHP 5 >= 5.1.0, PECL pdo >= 0.1.0)

To your particular case, returning a boolean:

return $query->rowCount() ? true : false;
  • 2
    I would like to add that this returns true in case there has been an actual change, but returns false when the row was already exactly how you're updating it. This may sound logical, but if you wanted to use this feature to check if a row exists under the update's where conditions, you can't use this. – Arie Aug 13 '16 at 19:30
  • 1
    @Arie that's a fair point but you should probably use something like SELECT 1 FROM tbl WHERE ... to determine if a record exists; MySQL only returns the number of rows actually altered by an UPDATE query. If the data hasn't changed, nothing has been altered and zero is returned. Though if you use INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE ... it should return a row count of 0 if nothing has changed, 1 if it's a new record (inserted) and 2 if it's an existing record that's been updated. – CD001 Aug 15 '16 at 8:54
  • Good to have this cleared up. I sometimes use an UPDATE query with e.g. WHERE user_id = ? AND id = ?, so you let MySQL do the checking if someone is updating his own record or that it belongs to another user. Then another query that continues on the outcome of the UPDATE's WHERE condition. I would have liked it if it would return true in this case too, so I wouldn't have to do an additional SELECT query. – Arie Aug 15 '16 at 18:03
1

If something went wrong but your code was updated in the database, that sounds like a really precarious state to be in. It's probably better to use a transaction and rollback on exception.

Something like (untested):

$this->db->beginTransaction();
try {
       $SQL = "UPDATE addressbook SET valid = '0' WHERE id = :id";
      $query = $this->db->prepare($SQL);
      $query->bindValue(":id", $id);
      $query->execute();

      $this->db->commit();

      return true;

      //How do I know if record has been updated? 
} catch (PDOException $e) {
      $this->db->rollback();
      return false;
}

Also, you probably don't want to mix your JSON in with this code, separate it out and have something outside your class deal with JSON.

  • "separate it out and have something outside your class deal with JSON." How? Have you got any example of that – I'll-Be-Back Oct 12 '11 at 9:18
  • Has nothing to do the question is to check if any rows where updated meaning if the query executes well but no rows are updated your code will return true, the point is a change must be made – zardilior Nov 12 '16 at 20:05
  • @zardilior The question as asked is unclear as to what meaning it wanted. I guessed one way and someone else guessed another; turns out I was incorrect, yes. – Levi Morrison Nov 13 '16 at 20:11
  • I believe the question is clear and whit a chosen answer is clearee – zardilior Nov 13 '16 at 22:12
  • So... what do you want, @zardilior? – Levi Morrison Nov 13 '16 at 23:57

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