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Instead of something like lm(bp~height+age, data=mydata) I would like to specify the columns by number, not name.

I tried lm(mydata[[1]]~mydata[[2]]+mydata[[3]]) but the problem with this is that, in the fitted model, the coefficients are named mydata[[2]], mydata[[3]] etc, whereas I would like them to have the real column names.

Perhaps this is a case of not having your cake and eating it, but if the experts could advise whether this is possible I would be grateful

4
  • 1
    You might get better answers if you give a slightly larger context for what you're trying to do: "what is the problem you are trying to solve"?
    – Ben Bolker
    Oct 12, 2011 at 15:23
  • Thanks for your comment. I have a large number of columns in a dataframe. I am fitting a linear model using a subset of these, using various techniques including stepwise selection. It will be convenient if I can refer to the columns by number when calling lm() but if possible I would like the model to show the column names.
    – LeelaSella
    Oct 12, 2011 at 15:28
  • 1
    I would paste together a formula based on the names, as in: stackoverflow.com/questions/6877534/…
    – Ben Bolker
    Oct 12, 2011 at 15:30
  • If you come up with a good solution you're allowed (encouraged) to post an answer to your own question ...
    – Ben Bolker
    Oct 12, 2011 at 15:52

2 Answers 2

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lm(
    as.formula(paste(colnames(mydata)[1], "~",
        paste(colnames(mydata)[c(2, 3)], collapse = "+"),
        sep = ""
    )),
    data=mydata
)

Instead of c(2, 3) you can use how many indices you want (no need for for loop).

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  • 1
    missing a comma at the end of the third line?
    – Ben Bolker
    Oct 12, 2011 at 16:32
  • Thanks, @Ben. Also, maybe using as.formula would be more robust, though not needed for lm() (but for other models do).
    – Tomas
    Oct 12, 2011 at 16:45
  • Thank you. This spells out what Ben Bolker suggested earlier, and works perfectly.
    – LeelaSella
    Oct 12, 2011 at 21:09
  • 1
    To make this completely foolproof I needed to add backticks around the column names because of special characters in the names: paste('`', colnames(mydata)[c(2,3)], '`', sep = "", collapse = "+")
    – Evertvdw
    Jan 10, 2018 at 9:30
2
lm(mydata[,1] ~ ., mydata[-1])

The trick that I found in a course on R is to remove the response column, otherwise you get warning "essentially perfect fit: summary may be unreliable". I do not know why it works, it does not follow from documentation. Normally, we keep the response column in.

And a simplified version of the earlier answer by Tomas:

lm(
    as.formula(paste(colnames(mydata)[1], "~ .")),
    data=mydata
)

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