169

Is there a way to use a Tuple class, but supply the names of the items in it?

For example:

public Tuple<int, int, int int> GetOrderRelatedIds()

That returns the ids for OrderGroupId, OrderTypeId, OrderSubTypeId and OrderRequirementId.

It would be nice to let the users of my method know which is which. (When you call the method, the results are result.Item1, result.Item2, result.Item3, result.Item4. It is not clear which one is which.)

(I know I could just create a class to hold all these Ids, but it these Ids already have their own classes they live in and making a class for this one method's return value seems silly.)

13 Answers 13

221

In C# 7.0 (Visual Studio 2017) there is a new construction to do that:

(string first, string middle, string last) LookupName(long id)
  • 1
    @RedRidingHood: Yes, it is possible. – nothrow Mar 24 '17 at 22:21
  • 51
    The syntax is List<(int first, int second)>. I had to download the System.ValueTuple package from NuGet to get it to work in Visual Studio 2017. – Matt Davis Mar 25 '17 at 23:19
  • 8
    To create the value return (first: first, middle: middle, last: last); – fiat Sep 11 '17 at 1:02
  • 3
    or only: return (first, middle, last); in .NET 4.7.1 (not sure for 4.7.0) – watbywbarif Dec 13 '17 at 9:45
  • 9
    It should be noted that C# 7's ValueTuple, while usually great, is a mutable value type (struct), while Tuple is an immutable reference type (class). As far as I know, there's no way to get a reference type Tuple with friendly item names. – dx_over_dt Jul 11 '18 at 21:20
51

Up to C# 7.0, there was no way to do this short of defining your own type.

  • 11
    I cannot believe this answer is accepted with a score of 40. You could have at least shown how a class with a proper constructor can substitute this. – bytecode77 Aug 18 '16 at 18:09
  • @bytecode77 Well, pretty soon this answer is going to be straight up wrong: github.com/dotnet/roslyn/issues/347 – MarkPflug Aug 19 '16 at 15:44
  • I've seen these language festure proposals. But until now, a class is the only proper solution for more complex datatypes. Why would you want to forcibly use Tuples no matter what (see other answers) – bytecode77 Aug 19 '16 at 15:52
  • 2
    After C# 7 is released, it will be possible to do this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/mt595758.aspx – Burak Karakuş Sep 7 '16 at 8:08
  • 8
    The Q' has c#4 as a tag, so although this answer is short it's still correct. – Steve Drake Sep 6 '17 at 12:41
32

Here is an overly complicated version of what you are asking:

class MyTuple : Tuple<int, int>
{
    public MyTuple(int one, int two)
        :base(one, two)
    {

    }

    public int OrderGroupId { get{ return this.Item1; } }
    public int OrderTypeId { get{ return this.Item2; } }

}

Why not just make a class?

  • 2
    would struct be better in this case instead of Class? – deathrace May 28 '15 at 13:32
  • 5
    The slight advantage I see of this is that it automatically implements the equals operator, checking that 2 instances are equal if the items are all equal. – JSoet Jun 23 '15 at 17:12
  • 7
    Another drawback to this approach is that Item1 and Item2 are still public properties on MyTuple – RJFalconer Sep 11 '15 at 13:01
  • 3
    @deathrace Tuple themselves are classes, so if you want to directly inherit from Tuple<T, T2> you can't be a struct. – Chakrava Jul 25 '16 at 14:17
  • 3
    I may be wrong but I mostly use tuple wherever I want to return an object but doesn't want to define a specific class.. – Jay Mar 17 '17 at 5:14
12

With .net 4 you could perhaps look at the ExpandoObject, however, don't use it for this simple case as what would have been compile-time errors become run-time errors.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        dynamic employee, manager;

        employee = new ExpandoObject();
        employee.Name = "John Smith";
        employee.Age = 33;

        manager = new ExpandoObject();
        manager.Name = "Allison Brown";
        manager.Age = 42;
        manager.TeamSize = 10;

        WritePerson(manager);
        WritePerson(employee);
    }
    private static void WritePerson(dynamic person)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} is {1} years old.",
                          person.Name, person.Age);
        // The following statement causes an exception
        // if you pass the employee object.
        // Console.WriteLine("Manages {0} people", person.TeamSize);
    }
}
// This code example produces the following output:
// John Smith is 33 years old.
// Allison Brown is 42 years old.

Something else worth mentioning is an anonymous type for within a method, but you need to create a class if you want to return it.

var MyStuff = new
    {
        PropertyName1 = 10,
        PropertyName2 = "string data",
        PropertyName3 = new ComplexType()
    };
3

If the types of your items are all different, here is a class I made to get them more intuitively.

The usage of this class:

var t = TypedTuple.Create("hello", 1, new MyClass());
var s = t.Get<string>();
var i = t.Get<int>();
var c = t.Get<MyClass>();

Source code:

public static class TypedTuple
{
    public static TypedTuple<T1> Create<T1>(T1 t1)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1>(t1);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2> Create<T1, T2>(T1 t1, T2 t2)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2>(t1, t2);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3> Create<T1, T2, T3>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3>(t1, t2, t3);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4>(t1, t2, t3, t4);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5, T6 t6)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5, T6 t6, T7 t7)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5, T6 t6, T7 t7, T8 t8)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7, t8);
    }

}

public class TypedTuple<T>
{
    protected Dictionary<Type, object> items = new Dictionary<Type, object>();

    public TypedTuple(T item1)
    {
        Item1 = item1;
    }

    public TSource Get<TSource>()
    {
        object value;
        if (this.items.TryGetValue(typeof(TSource), out value))
        {
            return (TSource)value;
        }
        else
            return default(TSource);
    }

    private T item1;
    public T Item1 { get { return this.item1; } set { this.item1 = value; this.items[typeof(T)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2> : TypedTuple<T1>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2)
        : base(item1)
    {
        Item2 = item2;
    }

    private T2 item2;
    public T2 Item2 { get { return this.item2; } set { this.item2 = value; this.items[typeof(T2)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3> : TypedTuple<T1, T2>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3)
        : base(item1, item2)
    {
        Item3 = item3;
    }

    private T3 item3;
    public T3 Item3 { get { return this.item3; } set { this.item3 = value; this.items[typeof(T3)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4)
        : base(item1, item2, item3)
    {
        Item4 = item4;
    }

    private T4 item4;
    public T4 Item4 { get { return this.item4; } set { this.item4 = value; this.items[typeof(T4)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4)
    {
        Item5 = item5;
    }

    private T5 item5;
    public T5 Item5 { get { return this.item5; } set { this.item5 = value; this.items[typeof(T5)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5, T6 item6)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4, item5)
    {
        Item6 = item6;
    }

    private T6 item6;
    public T6 Item6 { get { return this.item6; } set { this.item6 = value; this.items[typeof(T6)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5, T6 item6, T7 item7)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4, item5, item6)
    {
        Item7 = item7;
    }

    private T7 item7;
    public T7 Item7 { get { return this.item7; } set { this.item7 = value; this.items[typeof(T7)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5, T6 item6, T7 item7, T8 item8)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4, item5, item6, item7)
    {
        Item8 = item8;
    }

    private T8 item8;
    public T8 Item8 { get { return this.item8; } set { this.item8 = value; this.items[typeof(T8)] = value; } }
}
  • 3
    This seems like a lot of work for little to no payoff. It has an unintuitive limitation (no duplicate types), and I find the idea of retrieving a value by only its type alone incredibly unintuitive and cannot think of a practical use case for it. This is the equivalent of making a data table for employees, then deciding to retrieve employees by their first name (as opposed to a unique key) and subsequently requiring all employees to have different first names. This isn't a solution to a problem, it's using a solution at the cost of creating an extra problem. – Flater May 9 '18 at 10:24
  • And may God have mercy on your soul. – Jamie M. Jun 19 at 22:18
3

Reproducing my answer from this post as it is a better fit here.

Starting C# v7.0 now it is possible to name the tuple properties which earlier used to default to names like Item1, Item2 and so on.

Naming the properties of Tuple Literals:

var myDetails = (MyName: "RBT_Yoga", MyAge: 22, MyFavoriteFood: "Dosa");
Console.WriteLine($"Name - {myDetails.MyName}, Age - {myDetails.MyAge}, Passion - {myDetails.MyFavoriteFood}");

The output on console:

Name - RBT_Yoga, Age - 22, Passion - Dosa

Returning Tuple (having named properties) from a method:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var empInfo = GetEmpInfo();
    Console.WriteLine($"Employee Details: {empInfo.firstName}, {empInfo.lastName}, {empInfo.computerName}, {empInfo.Salary}");
}

static (string firstName, string lastName, string computerName, int Salary) GetEmpInfo()
{
    //This is hardcoded just for the demonstration. Ideally this data might be coming from some DB or web service call
    return ("Rasik", "Bihari", "Rasik-PC", 1000);
}

The output on console:

Employee Details: Rasik, Bihari, Rasik-PC, 1000

Creating a list of Tuples having named properties

var tupleList = new List<(int Index, string Name)>
{
    (1, "cow"),
    (5, "chickens"),
    (1, "airplane")
};

foreach (var tuple in tupleList)
    Console.WriteLine($"{tuple.Index} - {tuple.Name}");

Output on console:

1 - cow 5 - chickens 1 - airplane

I hope I've covered everything. In case, there is anything which I've missed then please give me a feedback in comments.

Note: My code snippets are using string interpolation feature of C# v7 as detailed here.

3

MichaelMocko Answered is great,

but I want to add a few things which I had to figure out

(string first, string middle, string last) LookupName(long id)

above Line will give you compile time error if you are using .net framework < 4.7

So if you have a project that is using .net framework < 4.7 and still you want to use ValueTuple than workAround would be installing this nuget package

2

No, you can't name the tuple members.

The in-between would be to use ExpandoObject instead of Tuple.

1

This is very annoying and I expect future versions of C# will address this need. I find the easiest work around to be either use a different data structure type or rename the "items" for your sanity and for the sanity of others reading your code.

Tuple<ApiResource, JSendResponseStatus> result = await SendApiRequest();
ApiResource apiResource = result.Item1;
JSendResponseStatus jSendStatus = result.Item2;
0

I think I would create a class but another alternative is output parameters.

public void GetOrderRelatedIds(out int OrderGroupId, out int OrderTypeId, out int OrderSubTypeId, out int OrderRequirementId)

Since your Tuple only contains integers you could represent it with a Dictionary<string,int>

var orderIds = new Dictionary<string, int> {
    {"OrderGroupId", 1},
    {"OrderTypeId", 2},
    {"OrderSubTypeId", 3},
    {"OrderRequirementId", 4}.
};

but I don't recommend that either.

0

Why is everyone making life so hard. Tuples are for rather temporary data processing. Working with Tuples all the time will make the code very hard to understand at some point. Creating classes for everything could eventually bloat your project.

It's about balance, however...

Your problem seems to be something you would want a class for. And just for the sake of completeness, this class below also contains constructors.


This is the proper pattern for

  • A custom data type
    • with no further functionality. Getters and setters can also be expanded with code, getting/setting private members with the name pattern of "_orderGroupId", while also executing functional code.
  • Including constructors. You can also choose to include just one constructor if all properties are mandatory.
  • If you want to use all constructors, bubbling like this is the proper pattern to avoid duplicate code.

public class OrderRelatedIds
{
    public int OrderGroupId { get; set; }
    public int OrderTypeId { get; set; }
    public int OrderSubTypeId { get; set; }
    public int OrderRequirementId { get; set; }

    public OrderRelatedIds()
    {
    }
    public OrderRelatedIds(int orderGroupId)
        : this()
    {
        OrderGroupId = orderGroupId;
    }
    public OrderRelatedIds(int orderGroupId, int orderTypeId)
        : this(orderGroupId)
    {
        OrderTypeId = orderTypeId;
    }
    public OrderRelatedIds(int orderGroupId, int orderTypeId, int orderSubTypeId)
        : this(orderGroupId, orderTypeId)
    {
        OrderSubTypeId = orderSubTypeId;
    }
    public OrderRelatedIds(int orderGroupId, int orderTypeId, int orderSubTypeId, int orderRequirementId)
        : this(orderGroupId, orderTypeId, orderSubTypeId)
    {
        OrderRequirementId = orderRequirementId;
    }
}

Or, if you want it really simple: You can also use type initializers:

OrderRelatedIds orders = new OrderRelatedIds
{
    OrderGroupId = 1,
    OrderTypeId = 2,
    OrderSubTypeId = 3,
    OrderRequirementId = 4
};

public class OrderRelatedIds
{
    public int OrderGroupId;
    public int OrderTypeId;
    public int OrderSubTypeId;
    public int OrderRequirementId;
}
0

I would write the Item names in the summay.. so by hovering over the function helloworld() the text will say hello = Item1 and world = Item2

 helloworld("Hi1,Hi2");

/// <summary>
/// Return hello = Item1 and world Item2
/// </summary>
/// <param name="input">string to split</param>
/// <returns></returns>
private static Tuple<bool, bool> helloworld(string input)
{
    bool hello = false;
    bool world = false;
    foreach (var hw in input.Split(','))
    {
        switch (hw)
        {
            case "Hi1":
                hello= true;
                break;
            case "Hi2":
                world= true;
                break;
        }

    }
    return new Tuple<bool, bool>(hello, world);
}
-1

You Can write a class that contains the Tuple.

You need to override the Equals and GetHashCode functions

and the == and != operators.

class Program
{
    public class MyTuple
    {
        private Tuple<int, int> t;

        public MyTuple(int a, int b)
        {
            t = new Tuple<int, int>(a, b);
        }

        public int A
        {
            get
            {
                return t.Item1;
            }
        }

        public int B
        {
            get
            {
                return t.Item2;
            }
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            return t.Equals(((MyTuple)obj).t);
        }

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return t.GetHashCode();
        }

        public static bool operator ==(MyTuple m1, MyTuple m2)
        {
            return m1.Equals(m2);
        }

        public static bool operator !=(MyTuple m1, MyTuple m2)
        {
            return !m1.Equals(m2);
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var v1 = new MyTuple(1, 2);
        var v2 = new MyTuple(1, 2);

        Console.WriteLine(v1 == v2);

        Dictionary<MyTuple, int> d = new Dictionary<MyTuple, int>();
        d.Add(v1, 1);

        Console.WriteLine(d.ContainsKey(v2));
    }
}

will return:

True

True

  • 2
    If you already implemented a class for this data type, why do you declare a Tuple for the underlying data instead of just properties? – bytecode77 Aug 18 '16 at 19:25
  • I want to use the tuple attribute that it comper by value in Equals function – s-s Nov 17 '16 at 10:42
  • That may be a bonus. But on the other hand you basically created a class with properties that range from Item1 to ItemX. I would choose proper naming and more code in Equals() over using a tuple. – bytecode77 Nov 17 '16 at 13:11

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