196

I'm reading Learn You a Haskell for Great Good, and I never know how to pronounce the Haskell operators. Do they have "real" names? ?

For instance, how do you read aloud an expression like this one?

Just (+3) <*> Just 9

I know that >>= is "bind", but what about the others? Since Google doesn't take non-alphanumeric characters into account, it's kind of hard to do an efficient search...

I realize you can create your own operators, so of course not all operators can have names, but I expect that the common ones (e.g. those defined in Applicative or Monad) must have names...

closed as primarily opinion-based by Cerbrus, Nkosi, techraf, rene, kayess Feb 15 '18 at 10:14

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Its a good question, and I'm not aware of any answers. Perhaps we need a naming scheme, or perhaps library authors should provide pronounceable names as part of Haddock docs. – Paul Johnson Oct 12 '11 at 21:42
  • 3
    Very good question. Usually I read <*> as "apply" and <$> as "fmap". As for the others I have no idea. – DuoSRX Oct 12 '11 at 21:46
  • 3
    Is this a duplicate of "Haskell: How is <*> pronounced?"? Even if it isn't, its answers are probably worth checking out. – Antal Spector-Zabusky Oct 12 '11 at 21:46
  • 8
    Also, check out the Haskell wiki's page on pronunciation. It's incomplete, but relevant. – Antal Spector-Zabusky Oct 12 '11 at 22:33
  • 3
    () is pronounced unit. One time I found myself stuck in front of an audience of a couple of hundred functional programmers not knowing how to pronounce that on my slide. – sigfpe May 31 '14 at 15:35
188

Here is how I pronounce them:

>>=     bind
>>      then
*>      then
->      to                a -> b: a to b
<-      bind              (as it desugars to >>=)
<$>     (f)map
<$      map-replace by    0 <$ f: "f map-replace by 0"
<*>     ap(ply)           (as it is the same as Control.Monad.ap)
$                         (none, just as " " [whitespace])
.       pipe to           a . b: "b pipe-to a"
!!      index
!       index / strict    a ! b: "a index b", foo !x: foo strict x
<|>     or / alternative  expr <|> term: "expr or term"
++      concat / plus / append
[]      empty list
:       cons
::      of type / as      f x :: Int: f x of type Int
\       lambda
@       as                go ll@(l:ls): go ll as l cons ls
~       lazy              go ~(a,b): go lazy pair a, b
  • 97
    to me, (.) is "compose". – luqui Oct 12 '11 at 22:13
  • 46
    I usually rather pronounce (.) as of and ($) as applied to : f . g . h $ x is hence read f of g of h applied to x. But I understand divergence in this point of view! – Ptival Oct 12 '11 at 22:21
  • 37
    I think pronouncing (.) as "after" is more sensible. Composition can be denoted in two directions, and calling it "after" immediately explains how it works, too. – user824425 Oct 12 '11 at 23:05
  • 1
    @Tinctorius, whether composition is after or before depends on a point of view that is not universal. For example, in const 42 . fix id, can we really say const 42 comes "after" an infinite loop? – luqui Oct 12 '11 at 23:59
  • 6
    I would call ++ "append" instead of concat, since concat is already a thing in Haskell and it's utility is very different. – Benjamin Kovach Aug 24 '12 at 20:52
39
| sym  | pronunciation                                    |
|------|--------------------------------------------------|
| |    | "such that"                                      |
| <-   | "is drawn from"                                  |
| =    | "is defined to be" / "is defined as"             |
| ::   | "has type" / "of type" / "is of type"            |
| ->   | "a function that takes ... and returns a ..." /  |
|      |                          "function that maps" /  |
|      |                          "is a function from" /  |
|      |                                          "to"    |
| $    | "apply"                                          |
| _    | "whatever"                                       |
| !!   | "index"                                          |
| ++   | "concat"                                         |
| []   | "empty list"                                     |
| :    | "cons"                                           |
| \    | "lambda"                                         |
| =>   | "implies" / "then"                               |
| *>   | "then"                                           |
| <$>  | "fmap" / "dollar cyclops"                        |
| <$   | "map-replace by"                                 |
| <*>  | "ap" / "star cyclops"                            |
| .    | "pipe to" / "compose" / "dot"                    |
| <|>  | "or"                                             |
| @    | "as"                                             |
| ~    | "lazy"                                           |
| <=<  | "left fish"                                      |
  • 2
    Thanks for your answer. "dollar cyclop" made me laugh :) – Thomas Levesque May 28 '13 at 22:13
  • 9
    Cyclops is singular, you don't need to drop the s. :) – Rahul Jan 5 '14 at 11:43
  • 1
    What about <*? Is it so rarely used that it doesn't have a common name? – Dannyu NDos Oct 6 '18 at 11:16
29

My personal favorites are "left fish" (<=<) and "right fish" (>=>). Which are just the left and right Kleisli composition of monads operators. Compose fishy, compose!

8

I took the liberty to assemble the answers into a very simple haskell program, that only through pattern matching tries to translate haskell code into english. I call it letterator because it translates symbols into letters

-- letterator

main = translateLn <$> getLine >>= putStrLn

translateLn :: String -> String
translateLn = unwords . map t . words

t :: String -> String -- t(ranslate)

-- historical accurate naming
t "=" = "is equal too" -- The Whetstone of Witte - Robert Recorde (1557)

-- proposed namings
-- src http://stackoverflow.com/a/7747115/1091457
t ">>=" = "bind"
t "*>"  = "then"
t "->"  = "to"                   -- a -> b: a to b
t "<$"  = "map-replace by"       --  0 <$ f: "f map-replace by 0"
t "<*>" = "ap(ply)"              --  (as it is the same as Control.Monad.ap)
t "!!"  = "index"
t "!"   = "index/strict"         --  a ! b: "a index b", foo !x: foo strict x
t "<|>" = "or/alternative"       -- expr <|> term: "expr or term"
t "[]"  = "empty list"
t ":"   = "cons"
t "\\"  = "lambda"
t "@"   = "as"                   -- go ll@(l:ls): go ll as l cons ls
t "~"   = "lazy"                 -- go ~(a,b): go lazy pair a, b
-- t ">>"  = "then"
-- t "<-"  = "bind"              -- (as it desugars to >>=)
-- t "<$>" = "(f)map"
-- t "$"   = ""                  -- (none, just as " " [whitespace])
-- t "."   = "pipe to"           -- a . b: "b pipe-to a"
-- t "++"  = "concat/plus/append" 
-- t "::"  = "ofType/as"         -- f x :: Int: f x of type Int

-- additional names
-- src http://stackoverflow.com/a/16801782/1091457
t "|"   = "such that"
t "<-"  = "is drawn from"
t "::"  = "is of type" 
t "_"   = "whatever"
t "++"  = "append"
t "=>"  = "implies"
t "."   = "compose"
t "<=<" = "left fish"
-- t "="   = "is defined as"
-- t "<$>" = "(f)map"

-- src http://stackoverflow.com/a/7747149/1091457
t "$"   = "of" 

-- src http://stackoverflow.com/questions/28471898/colloquial-terms-for-haskell-operators-e-g?noredirect=1&lq=1#comment45268311_28471898
t ">>"  = "sequence"
-- t "<$>" = "infix fmap"
-- t ">>=" = "bind"

--------------
-- Examples --
--------------

-- "(:) <$> Just 3 <*> Just [4]" 
-- meaning "Cons applied to just three applied to just list with one element four"
t "(:)"  = "Cons"
t "Just" = "just"
t "<$>"  = "applied to"
t "3"    = "three" -- this is might go a bit too far
t "[4]"  = "list with one element four" -- this one too, let's just see where this gets us

-- additional expressions to translate from
-- src http://stackoverflow.com/a/21322952/1091457
-- delete (0, 0) $ (,) <$> [-1..1] <*> [-1..1]
-- (,) <$> [-1..1] <*> [-1..1] & delete (0, 0)
-- liftA2 (,) [-1..1] [-1..1] & delete (0, 0)
t "(,)" = "tuple constructor"
t "&" = "then" -- flipped `$`

-- everything not matched until this point stays at it is
t x = x
5
+      plus
-      minus (OR negative OR negate for unary use)
*      multiply OR times
/      divide
.      dot OR compose
$      apply OR of
  • 11
    These ones are quite obvious... My question was about the more unusual operators like <*>, >>... – Thomas Levesque Oct 12 '11 at 22:04
  • 19
    For completeness. – Thomas Eding Oct 12 '11 at 22:06

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