115

For example I have the variable 3.545555555, which I would want to truncate to just 3.54.

2
  • 28
    This is NOT a duplicate. Truncating and rounding are two completely different things. Mar 1, 2018 at 14:53
  • Agreed, don't know why this is flagged as duplicate.
    – Bassinator
    Apr 23, 2018 at 20:18

17 Answers 17

162

If you want that for display purposes, use java.text.DecimalFormat:

 new DecimalFormat("#.##").format(dblVar);

If you need it for calculations, use java.lang.Math:

 Math.floor(value * 100) / 100;
5
  • 53
    This will not display a truncated 3.545555555 to 3.54, but rounded to 3.55. DecimalFormat.setRoundingMode() needs to be set to RoundingMode.FLOOR; Jan 7, 2013 at 13:26
  • 10
    this doesn't work for me Math.floor(9.62 * 100) / 100 gives 9.61
    – Mani
    Jan 30, 2014 at 21:30
  • 4
    Using floor to truncate only works for positive values.
    – Dev
    May 28, 2015 at 19:10
  • 4
    @ChristianGarcía Truncation is properly done with RoundingMode.DOWN as RoudingMode.FLOOR always rounds towards negative infinity.
    – Dev
    May 28, 2015 at 19:12
  • Second approach won't work always, check: Math.floor(2.28 * 100)/100 = 2.27 Feb 16, 2021 at 8:16
46
DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat(fmt);
df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.DOWN);
s = df.format(d);

Check available RoundingMode and DecimalFormat.

3
  • Does not address the Question, which asked for truncation rather than rounding. Apr 14, 2015 at 19:56
  • 8
    @BasilBourque RoundingMode.DOWN is truncation. Compare with other answers that incorrectly recommend floor functions (floor only truncates positive numbers), this works correctly for both positive and negative values.
    – Dev
    May 28, 2015 at 19:09
  • 1
    @Dev I stand corrected. I see now that DOWN does indeed have the effect of truncation for both positive and negative numbers. As seen in examples table in the doc. May 28, 2015 at 20:42
29

None of the other answers worked for both positive and negative values ( I mean for the calculation and just to do "truncate" without Rounding). and without converting to string.

From the How to round a number to n decimal places in Java link

private static BigDecimal truncateDecimal(double x,int numberofDecimals)
{
    if ( x > 0) {
        return new BigDecimal(String.valueOf(x)).setScale(numberofDecimals, BigDecimal.ROUND_FLOOR);
    } else {
        return new BigDecimal(String.valueOf(x)).setScale(numberofDecimals, BigDecimal.ROUND_CEILING);
    }
}

This method worked fine for me .

System.out.println(truncateDecimal(0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.62, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.621, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.629, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.625, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.0, 2));

Results :

0.00
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.99
-9.99
-9.00
4
9

Note first that a double is a binary fraction and does not really have decimal places.

If you need decimal places, use a BigDecimal, which has a setScale() method for truncation, or use DecimalFormat to get a String.

7

If, for whatever reason, you don't want to use a BigDecimal you can cast your double to an int to truncate it.

If you want to truncate to the Ones place:

  • simply cast to int

To the Tenths place:

  • multiply by ten
  • cast to int
  • cast back to double
  • and divide by ten.

Hundreths place

  • multiply and divide by 100 etc.

Example:

static double truncateTo( double unroundedNumber, int decimalPlaces ){
    int truncatedNumberInt = (int)( unroundedNumber * Math.pow( 10, decimalPlaces ) );
    double truncatedNumber = (double)( truncatedNumberInt / Math.pow( 10, decimalPlaces ) );
    return truncatedNumber;
}

In this example, decimalPlaces would be the number of places PAST the ones place you wish to go, so 1 would round to the tenths place, 2 to the hundredths, and so on (0 rounds to the ones place, and negative one to the tens, etc.)

2
  • 3
    This is a terrible general solution. Both the multiply and the cast will end up throwing away data and resulting in what are effectively random numbers if unroundedNumber is big enough. It may work for the example in the question, but a general solution should work for any double.
    – blm
    Nov 14, 2015 at 7:35
  • Does not work correctly on e.g. 2.28, 9.62 or 9411.3 Sep 3, 2021 at 16:08
7

Formating as a string and converting back to double i think will give you the result you want.

The double value will not be round(), floor() or ceil().

A quick fix for it could be:

 String sValue = (String) String.format("%.2f", oldValue);
 Double newValue = Double.parseDouble(sValue);

You can use the sValue for display purposes or the newValue for calculation.

1
  • 1
    It does round for me to the nearest value. For eg: 0.018 is converted to 0.02 when I did this. Nov 10, 2019 at 5:51
6

You can use NumberFormat Class object to accomplish the task.

// Creating number format object to set 2 places after decimal point
NumberFormat nf = NumberFormat.getInstance();
nf.setMaximumFractionDigits(2);            
nf.setGroupingUsed(false);

System.out.println(nf.format(precision));// Assuming precision is a double type variable
1
  • I would also add nf.setMinimumFractionDigits(2);
    – Amir Dora.
    Aug 11, 2021 at 10:35
5

3.545555555 to get 3.54. Try Following for this:

    DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");

    df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.FLOOR);

    double result = new Double(df.format(3.545555555);

This will give= 3.54!

2
  • But i will get 3.5 if i set that value is 3.50123
    – Cyrus
    Nov 3, 2020 at 9:18
  • 1
    @Cyrus 3.5 is a correct result though for 3.50123. trunc(2) sort of function should truncate it to 3.50. Sep 3, 2021 at 16:06
2

Maybe Math.floor(value * 100) / 100? Beware that the values like 3.54 may be not exactly represented with a double.

7
  • Unforunately, there are counter-examples where this doesn't work: double value = 9411.3; System.out.println(Math.floor(value * 100) / 100); // 9411.29 Sep 3, 2021 at 15:42
  • Does not work correctly on e.g. 2.28, 9.62 or 9411.3 Sep 3, 2021 at 16:08
  • @DKroot: Depends on what you'd call "correctly". When you say double value = 2.28;, your value will be actually 2.279999999999999804600747665972448885440826416015625, so after truncating you'd get a honest 2.27. From my point of view, the problem is not with truncating, the problem is with assignment.
    – Vlad
    Sep 4, 2021 at 11:49
  • 1
    I know about binary precision loss. That's why trunc() is a dangerous operation. However, by "correctly", I mean "as expected from a user/math perspective": E.g. assert(2.28.trunc(2)) == 2.28 where trunc(precision) is a truncation method. For example, see this blog post (not mine): blog.mrhaki.com/2010/01/groovy-goodness-round-and-truncate.html Sep 5, 2021 at 17:23
  • @DKroot: It's the line "double d = 2.28;" which behaves wrong from the naïve user's perspective. You must know that that there is no such double number as 2.28, right? My code sees 2.279999... as input, and it has no clue (and must not have!) that the argument comes from the unsound assumption that it must have actually been 2.28 decimal. The code gets the number which is strictly less than 2.28, and produces the correct result.
    – Vlad
    Sep 6, 2021 at 11:23
1

Here is the method I use:

double a=3.545555555; // just assigning your decimal to a variable
a=a*100;              // this sets a to 354.555555
a=Math.floor(a);      // this sets a to 354
a=a/100;              // this sets a to 3.54 and thus removing all your 5's

This can also be done:

a=Math.floor(a*100) / 100;
1
  • Does not work correctly on e.g. 2.28, 9.62 or 9411.3 Sep 3, 2021 at 16:00
0

Maybe following :

double roundTwoDecimals(double d) { 
      DecimalFormat twoDForm = new DecimalFormat("#.##"); 
      return Double.valueOf(twoDForm.format(d));
}  
1
  • See the other answers. You can't do it reliably if the answer is to be represented in floating point.
    – user207421
    Oct 12, 2011 at 23:57
0

A quick check is to use the Math.floor method. I created a method to check a double for two or less decimal places below:

public boolean checkTwoDecimalPlaces(double valueToCheck) {

    // Get two decimal value of input valueToCheck 
    double twoDecimalValue = Math.floor(valueToCheck * 100) / 100;

    // Return true if the twoDecimalValue is the same as valueToCheck else return false
    return twoDecimalValue == valueToCheck;
}
0
      double value = 3.4555;
      String value1 =  String.format("% .3f", value) ;
      String value2 = value1.substring(0, value1.length() - 1);
      System.out.println(value2);         
      double doublevalue= Double.valueOf(value2);
      System.out.println(doublevalue);
1
  • 1
    Welcome to StackOverflow and congratulations on your first answer. While the code you posted may address the question asked by the original poster, you should add a few sentences to explain how your solution is better or more suited than the (many) other answers for some specific situations.
    – Patrick
    Dec 31, 2020 at 14:26
0

I used Math.floor() method and basic moving of decimal places by (100 = 2).

//3.545555555 to 3.54 by floor method
double x = 3.545555555;
double y = Math.floor(x * 100); //354
double z = y / 100; //3.54
0

double firstValue = -3.1756d;

double value1 = (((int)(Math.pow(10,3)*firstValue))/Math.pow(10,3));

1
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    – Community Bot
    May 11 at 6:00
-1

I have a slightly modified version of Mani's.

private static BigDecimal truncateDecimal(final double x, final int numberofDecimals) {
    return new BigDecimal(String.valueOf(x)).setScale(numberofDecimals, BigDecimal.ROUND_DOWN);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.62, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.621, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.629, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.625, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(3.545555555, 2));

    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.62, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.621, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.629, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.625, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-3.545555555, 2));

}

Output:

0.00
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.99
9.00
3.54
-9.62
-9.62
-9.62
-9.62
-9.99
-9.00
-3.54
-2

This worked for me:

double input = 104.8695412  //For example

long roundedInt = Math.round(input * 100);
double result = (double) roundedInt/100;

//result == 104.87

I personally like this version because it actually performs the rounding numerically, rather than by converting it to a String (or similar) and then formatting it.

1
  • 1
    The original question is about truncating, not rounding. Also, converting a double to a long won't work well at all if the double is large enough.
    – blm
    Nov 14, 2015 at 7:27

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