37

can anyone please tell me how to catch out of memory exception?

for ex.

try
{
    while(true)
    {
        int i = new int;
    }
}
catch( ? <--- what should be put here?)
{
    //exception handling
}

and also this,

queue<int> q;
try
{
     while(true)
     {
          q.push(10);
     }
}
catch( ? <---- what should be put here?)
{
     //error handling
}
49

Catch std::bad_alloc.

You will also need a strategy for handling the errors, since many of the things you'd like to do will require memory (even if it's only to display an error to the user before shutting down). One strategy is to allocate a block of memory at startup, and delete it in the exception handler before attempting to use more memory, so that there is some available to use.

  • Thank you!! it works – in His Steps Oct 13 '11 at 4:02
  • Note that in practical situations some memory might have already been freed by the stack unwinding (destruction of local std::string variables for instance) between throwing and catching the error. Typically a handler for std::bad_alloc will be fairly "on the outside" of the program, while memory could run out in a deeply nested situation. Just to say that something like printing an error message does not have to fail. – Marc van Leeuwen Aug 9 '16 at 6:26
18

As others have noted, what you want to catch is std::bad_alloc. You can also use catch(...) or catch(exception& ex) to catch any exception; the latter allows the exception data to be read and used in the exception handler.

Mark Ransom had already pointed out that when the program cannot allocate any more memory, even printing an error message may fail. Consider the following program:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    unsigned long long i = 0;
    try {
        while(true) {
            // Leaks memory on each iteration as there is no matching delete
            int* a = new int;
            i++;
        }
    } catch(bad_alloc& ex) {
        cerr << sizeof(int) * i << " bytes: Out of memory!";
        cin.get();
        exit(1);
    }

    return 0; // Unreachable
}

(I strongly recommend that the program be compiled as 32-bit to avoid running the system out of memory on a 64-bit machine. 32-bit programs cannot allocate more than 4 GB of memory, or 2 GB by default on Windows.)

When the first bad_alloc gets thrown in the infinite while loop, control is passed to the catch block, but the program still fails with an unhandled exception. Why? Another bad_alloc is thrown inside the exception handler while trying to print to cerr. You can verify this by using a debugger: Set a breakpoint at the catch(bad_alloc& ex) line, run the program in the debugger, then step through each statement once you reach the breakpoint. A bad_alloc exception will be thrown in the cerr statement.

As such, to properly handle an out-of-memory scenario, you need to set aside some memory so that you can print an error message before exiting. Otherwise, the program will just crash on an unhandled exception while trying to print the error message. To do so, you can allocate a block of memory that is deallocated in the exception handler, as Mark Ransom suggested:

// Reserve 16K of memory that can be deleted just in case we run out of memory
char* _emergencyMemory = new char[16384];
// ...
try {
// ...
} catch(bad_alloc& ex) {
    // Delete the reserved memory so we can print an error message before exiting
    delete[] _emergencyMemory;

    cerr << sizeof(int) * i << " bytes: Out of memory!";
    cin.get();
    exit(1);
}
//...
  • Ever heard about RAII? If you're doing software engineering like this, there is no need to use C++ -- you can use C. – user8434768 Jul 9 '18 at 15:46
  • I've seen people claiming, that the "trick" of pre-allocating memory leads to never running the chance of getting an out-of-memory condition. – user8434768 Jul 9 '18 at 15:47
  • And why would you catch std::bad_alloc as a value? – user8434768 Jul 9 '18 at 15:48
  • 2
    Updated the code to catch the exception by reference. However, this code purposely avoids RAII because it is specifically intended to leak memory for demonstration purposes. That's the whole point of the answer. – bwDraco Jul 9 '18 at 15:59
14
catch (std::bad_alloc& ba){
    cerr << "bad_alloc caught: " << ba.what() << endl;
}

As a note you should read bdonlan's comment. The call to cerr may very well fail. Mark Ransom's suggestion in his answer is a good strategy to mitigate this issue.

  • 8
    Note: That print to cerr may fail due to the out-of-memory condition. – bdonlan Oct 13 '11 at 3:28
  • @bdonlan: I agree with you there. I didn't consider that situation, I'm too used to that problem occurring when I try to allocate obscenely large vectors ;). I've updated my answer. – GWW Oct 13 '11 at 3:40
  • hm? How did you update your answer? – bdonlan Oct 13 '11 at 3:41
  • @bdonlan: Very slowly after I commented :P – GWW Oct 13 '11 at 3:43
5

You should catch an object of type std::bad_alloc.

Alternatively, you can also use a nothrow verison of new as:

int *pi = new (nothrow) int[N]; 
if(pi == NULL) 
{
   std::cout << "Could not allocate memory" << std::endl;
}

When you use this, no exception is thrown if the new fails. Instead,it simply returns NULL which you check before proceeding further.

  • Can I somehow set nothrow version of new as default, so I don't need to write (nothrow) everytime? – Quest Dec 27 '14 at 21:22
  • @Quest: I don't know if that is possible. Maybe, as a last resort, you could do this : #define NEW new (nothrow) and then int *pi = NEW int[N];. – Nawaz Dec 28 '14 at 3:22
  • I think I've never used this form of new as in my code, successful allocation of memory is not optional. – user8434768 Jul 9 '18 at 15:50

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