435

I have a function that returns information in seconds, but I need to store that information in hours:minutes:seconds.

Is there an easy way to convert the seconds to this format in Python?

10 Answers 10

681

You can use datetime.timedelta function:

>>> import datetime
>>> str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=666))
'0:11:06'
  • 7
    This is the best way, IMHO, as you can then use arithmetic on the timedelta and any datetime objects. – Matthew Schinckel Apr 22 '09 at 3:13
  • 12
    This works for multiple days: str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=60*60*24+1)) = '1 day, 0:00:01' – incognick Dec 29 '14 at 15:37
  • 3
    str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=round(666666.55))) correctly renders days; supresses the decimal seconds. – CPBL Nov 27 '16 at 19:43
  • 1
    timedelta is not overflow safe and cannot correctly perform mathematical operations, e.g. str(timedelta(hours=8) - timedelta(hours=10)) the result is '-1 day, 22:00:00' and the integer based solution is exactly for those situations where you need '-02:00:00'. – cprn Sep 21 '17 at 17:02
  • +1. This answer can be modified very easily. For example, if you want to omit a field when printing, use this: stackoverflow.com/questions/7999935/… – eric_kernfeld Oct 10 '18 at 15:40
598

By using the divmod() function, which does only a single division to produce both the quotient and the remainder, you can have the result very quickly with only two mathematical operations:

m, s = divmod(seconds, 60)
h, m = divmod(m, 60)

And then use string formatting to convert the result into your desired output:

print('{:d}:{:02d}:{:02d}'.format(h, m, s)) # Python 3
print(f'{h:d}:{m:02d}:{s:02d}') # Python 3.6+
  • 2
    If you prefer operators over functions, use the modulo; for example (only minutes/seconds) : '%d:%02dmn' % (seconds / 60, seconds % 60) – bufh May 20 '14 at 14:47
  • 15
    And you can extend it to days: d, h = divmod(h, 24). – Mark Ransom Oct 3 '14 at 14:47
  • 14
    @MarkRansom: and then to months m, d = divmod(m, 31). Oooops, no, you can't. Worse, your code will be wrong if leap seconds come into the game. Long story short: use timedelta and don't mess with the calendar, it will bite you. – user948581 Jun 2 '15 at 14:08
  • 4
    @Tibo does timedelta deal with leap seconds? I suspect not. There are plenty of applications where this simple math is more than sufficient. – Mark Ransom Jun 2 '15 at 15:08
  • 1
    @MarkRansom str(timedelta(hours=8) - timedelta(hours=10)) the result is '-1 day, 22:00:00' so... idk if it works with leap seconds but it doesn't work with negative numbers. – cprn Sep 25 '17 at 18:05
63

I can hardly name that an easy way (at least I can't remember the syntax), but it is possible to use time.strftime, which gives more control over formatting:

from time import strftime
from time import gmtime

strftime("%H:%M:%S", gmtime(666))
'00:11:06'

strftime("%H:%M:%S", gmtime(60*60*24))
'00:00:00'

gmtime is used to convert seconds to special tuple format that strftime() requires.

Note: Truncates after 23:59:59

  • Well, the answer is actually provided here - stackoverflow.com/questions/1384406/… – anatoly techtonik Jul 1 '14 at 10:15
  • 13
    Unfortunately this method starts measuring days from 1 so it isn't designed to represent time delta, and so it is an accident waiting to happen. For example with time.strftime('%d %H:%M:%S', time.gmtime(1)) => '1 day, 0:00:01'. – Riaz Rizvi Jan 1 '16 at 21:49
34

Using datetime:

With the ':0>8' format:

from datetime import timedelta

"{:0>8}".format(str(timedelta(seconds=66)))
# Result: '00:01:06'

"{:0>8}".format(str(timedelta(seconds=666777)))
# Result: '7 days, 17:12:57'

"{:0>8}".format(str(timedelta(seconds=60*60*49+109)))
# Result: '2 days, 1:01:49'

Without the ':0>8' format:

"{}".format(str(timedelta(seconds=66)))
# Result: '00:01:06'

"{}".format(str(timedelta(seconds=666777)))
# Result: '7 days, 17:12:57'

"{}".format(str(timedelta(seconds=60*60*49+109)))
# Result: '2 days, 1:01:49'

Using time:

from time import gmtime
from time import strftime

# NOTE: The following resets if it goes over 23:59:59!

strftime("%H:%M:%S", gmtime(125))
# Result: '00:02:05'

strftime("%H:%M:%S", gmtime(60*60*24-1))
# Result: '23:59:59'

strftime("%H:%M:%S", gmtime(60*60*24))
# Result: '00:00:00'

strftime("%H:%M:%S", gmtime(666777))
# Result: '17:12:57'
# Wrong
  • 1
    it fails if the delta is less than a second: "{:0>8}".format(timedelta(milliseconds=66)) '0:00:00.066000' – jfs Sep 12 '15 at 12:21
  • 1
    To everyone else: The without ':0>8': example is missing a leading 0. {:0>8} zero pads to the left 8 zeroes. – TankorSmash Jul 24 '17 at 22:11
  • 2
    In python 3.5.2, I get a TypeError. I'm formatting a time.time()-start variable. Any insight? TypeError: non-empty format string passed to object.__format__ – medley56 Sep 25 '17 at 16:40
  • I tried using datetime.now() instead of time.time() to generate my timedelta object and I get the same error. – medley56 Sep 25 '17 at 16:45
  • @medley56 When using Python3, you need to use str() if you are going use a format such as 0>8: "{:0>8}".format(str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=666777))). Check this answer for more info. – Berriel Sep 11 '18 at 21:10
18

This is my quick trick:

from humanfriendly import format_timespan
secondsPassed = 1302
format_timespan(secondsPassed)
# '21 minutes and 42 seconds'

For more info Visit: https://humanfriendly.readthedocs.io/en/latest/#humanfriendly.format_timespan

9

If you need to get datetime.time value, you can use this trick:

my_time = (datetime(1970,1,1) + timedelta(seconds=my_seconds)).time()

You cannot add timedelta to time, but can add it to datetime.

UPD: Yet another variation of the same technique:

my_time = (datetime.fromordinal(1) + timedelta(seconds=my_seconds)).time()

Instead of 1 you can use any number greater than 0. Here we use the fact that datetime.fromordinal will always return datetime object with time component being zero.

5

This is how I got it.

def sec2time(sec, n_msec=3):
    ''' Convert seconds to 'D days, HH:MM:SS.FFF' '''
    if hasattr(sec,'__len__'):
        return [sec2time(s) for s in sec]
    m, s = divmod(sec, 60)
    h, m = divmod(m, 60)
    d, h = divmod(h, 24)
    if n_msec > 0:
        pattern = '%%02d:%%02d:%%0%d.%df' % (n_msec+3, n_msec)
    else:
        pattern = r'%02d:%02d:%02d'
    if d == 0:
        return pattern % (h, m, s)
    return ('%d days, ' + pattern) % (d, h, m, s)

Some examples:

$ sec2time(10, 3)
Out: '00:00:10.000'

$ sec2time(1234567.8910, 0)
Out: '14 days, 06:56:07'

$ sec2time(1234567.8910, 4)
Out: '14 days, 06:56:07.8910'

$ sec2time([12, 345678.9], 3)
Out: ['00:00:12.000', '4 days, 00:01:18.900']
  • 1
    What is the advantage of this over the answer above? str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=666)) – Riaz Rizvi Jan 1 '16 at 21:38
  • @RiazRizvi gives consistent string length for microseconds for 666.0 and 666.1 values. – anatoly techtonik Mar 11 '17 at 15:50
5

The following set worked for me.

def sec_to_hours(seconds):
    a=str(seconds//3600)
    b=str((seconds%3600)//60)
    c=str((seconds%3600)%60)
    d=["{} hours {} mins {} seconds".format(a, b, c)]
    return d


print(sec_to_hours(10000))
# ['2 hours 46 mins 40 seconds']

print(sec_to_hours(60*60*24+105))
# ['24 hours 1 mins 45 seconds']
3

dateutil.relativedelta is convenient if you need to access hours, minutes and seconds as floats as well. datetime.timedelta does not provide a similar interface.

from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta
rt = relativedelta(seconds=5440)
print(rt.seconds)
print('{:02d}:{:02d}:{:02d}'.format(
    int(rt.hours), int(rt.minutes), int(rt.seconds)))

Prints

40.0
01:30:40
  • 1
    I'm getting different output from yours, which makes me think you have a typo. You probably meant to use seconds=5440 instead of seconds=5540. I like your answer, though! – J-L Jun 5 '19 at 23:52
-1

division = 3623 // 3600 #to hours
division2 = 600 // 60 #to minutes
print (division) #write hours
print (division2) #write minutes

PS My code is unprofessional

  • 1
    hey, the question ask for a format in hrs:min:sec , not a simple division.. – StupidWolf Nov 4 '19 at 11:25

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