1

I have a base table containing items and their prices between different dates. The table can be updated by users, via a file ingestion process, to put in updates/overrides for specified date periods. This leads to overlapping rows being loaded to the raw base table. I want to handle any overlapping date periods as explained below.

Source table:

ITEM_ID PRICE START_DATE END_DATE LOADED_DATETIME
A 1.00 2023-01-01 2023-01-31 2023-11-01
A 2.00 2023-01-10 2023-01-15 2023-11-02
B 4.00 2023-01-10 2023-01-31 2023-11-01

Desired query result:

ITEM_ID PRICE START_DATE END_DATE LOADED_DATETIME
A 1.00 2023-01-01 2023-01-09 2023-11-01
A 2.00 2023-01-10 2023-01-15 2023-11-02
A 1.00 2023-01-16 2023-01-31 2023-11-02
B 4.00 2023-01-10 2023-01-31 2023-11-01

The desired effect is as follows:

Any row which has another row with the same ITEM_ID should be split into two date ranges either side of any overlapping date ranges in other rows, where the overlapping row has a more recent LOADED_DATETIME. The split should create rows either side of the overlapping date range.

The example desired query result shows that for ITEM_ID 'A', there are now 3 rows:

  1. The overlapping row with the more recent LOADED_DATETIME (this remains untouched).
  2. A row for 2023-01-01 (the original start date) to 2023-01-09 (the day before the start date of the overlapping row with the greater LOADED_DATETIME).
  3. A row for 2023-01-16 (the day after the end date of the overlapping row) to 2023-01-31 (the original end date).

The row with ITEM_ID 'B' should remain untouched as there are no overlapping rows for that ITEM_ID.

How can I go about achieving this with SQL in Snowflake?

1
  • 1
    My friend, assuming these can get arbitrarily complex you are in for a rough time.
    – Error_2646
    Nov 21, 2023 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

1

Gut feeling a recursive approach could probably work. But handling all the odd sequencing you could see seems like a nightmare.

Taking a sledgehammer to it, provided your data isn't too large, is what I'd do.

Basically, explode the date intervals. Get the latest by loaded_datetime for each normalized date. Then recalculate your effective range.

This works for your sample data, a fine tooth comb would be needed to make sure all the scenarios with possible date gaps get handled correctly.

If your data is large, this is going to have a monstrous intermediate result size so it'd be a good idea to have a precheck so it only runs for ids with overlapping intervals (self join t1.start_date <= t2.end_date and t1.end_date >= t2.start_date). So you aren't eating the cost for inapplicable item_id, then union back.


    CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE some_test_data
      ( item_id varchar(255),
        price decimal(10,2),
        start_date date,
        end_date date,
        loaded_datetime date
      ); 
    
    insert into some_test_data values('A',1.00, TO_DATE('2023-01-01','YYYY-MM-DD'),TO_DATE('2023-01-31','YYYY-MM-DD'),TO_DATE('2023-11-01','YYYY-MM-DD'));
    insert into some_test_data values('A',2.00, TO_DATE('2023-01-10','YYYY-MM-DD'),TO_DATE('2023-01-15','YYYY-MM-DD'),TO_DATE('2023-11-02','YYYY-MM-DD'));
    insert into some_test_data values('B',4.00, TO_DATE('2023-01-10','YYYY-MM-DD'),TO_DATE('2023-01-31','YYYY-MM-DD'),TO_DATE('2023-11-01','YYYY-MM-DD'));
    
    WITH calendar AS (
      SELECT DATEADD(day, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY seq8()), '1999-12-31'::DATE) AS day
      FROM TABLE(GENERATOR(ROWCOUNT => 365*100))
    ),
    normalized_dates_on_latest_transaction as (
      SELECT td.item_id, 
             td.price,
             c.day,
             td.loaded_datetime
        FROM calendar c
        JOIN some_test_data td
          ON c.day BETWEEN td.start_date AND td.end_date
      qualify row_number() over ( partition by td.item_id,
                                               c.day
                                      order by td.loaded_datetime desc) = 1),
    remove_redundant_sequences as (
      select *
        from normalized_dates_on_latest_transaction
      qualify coalesce(
              lag(price) over ( partition by item_id
                                    order by day),-1) -- assumes price won't be negative. Just a dummy
                                                      -- to always pick up the first
                                    <> price
     )
     select rrs.item_id,
            rrs.price,
            rrs.day as start_date,
            coalesce(
              dateadd(rrs.day,
                     -1,
                     lead(rrs.day) over ( partition by rrs.item_id
                                          order by rrs.day)),
              orig.end_date) as end_date
       from remove_redundant_sequences rrs
       left
       join some_test_data orig -- pick up the original expiration date for records staying current
         on rrs.item_id = orig.item_id
        and rrs.loaded_datetime = orig.loaded_datetime

2
  • I would actually make an argument that storing this data by item and date might actually be the best solution, rather than grouping them back up again. It's easier to query and you could add a cluster key to the table on item and/or date for performance. Space is cheap and doing a MERGE to update each day's value for a new range update would be super straight-forward. Nov 21, 2023 at 21:00
  • @MikeWalton That's a good point.
    – Error_2646
    Nov 21, 2023 at 21:00
1

Given you data has a full span overlap:

A,b,c,d,e,g,H
    C,d,E

this implies you can also get overlapping sub ranges in the big range. So matching pairs could/will be explosive.

aka, thus for messy data like below, will make too many rows and waste time:

with data (ITEM_ID, PRICE, START_DATE, END_DATE, LOADED_DATETIME) as (
    select * from values
    ('A', 1.00, '2023-01-01'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date),
    ('A', 2.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-15'::date, '2023-11-02'::date),
    ('A', 3.00, '2023-01-14'::date, '2023-01-17'::date, '2023-11-03'::date),
    ('A', 4.00, '2023-01-15'::date, '2023-01-18'::date, '2023-11-04'::date),
    ('B', 4.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date)
)
select 
    *
from data as a
left join data as b
    on a.item_id = b.item_id
        and a.start_date < b.end_date
        and b.start_date < a.end_date
        and ( a.PRICE != b.PRICE and 
            a.START_DATE != b.START_DATE and 
            a.END_DATE != b.END_DATE and 
            a.LOADED_DATETIME != b.LOADED_DATETIME)
order by 1,3;

I would be inclined to change to a "all distinct dates" and reslice the data that way.

like:

with data (ITEM_ID, PRICE, START_DATE, END_DATE, LOADED_DATETIME) as (
    select * from values
    ('A', 1.00, '2023-01-01'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date),
    ('A', 2.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-15'::date, '2023-11-02'::date),
    ('B', 4.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date)
), dist_dates as (
    select distinct item_id, start_date from data
    union 
    select distinct item_id, end_date from data 
)
select 
    item_id, 
    start_date, 
    lead(start_date) over (partition by item_id order by start_date) as end_date
from dist_dates
qualify end_date is not null;

enter image description here

now we use the above range matching pairs join logic:

with data (ITEM_ID, PRICE, START_DATE, END_DATE, LOADED_DATETIME) as (
    select * from values
    ('A', 1.00, '2023-01-01'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date),
    ('A', 2.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-15'::date, '2023-11-02'::date),
    ('B', 4.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date)
), dist_dates as (
    select distinct item_id, start_date from data
    union 
    select distinct item_id, end_date from data 
), id_date_ranges as (
    select 
        item_id, 
        start_date, 
        lead(start_date) over (partition by item_id order by start_date) as end_date
    from dist_dates
    qualify end_date is not null
)
select 
    dr.*,
    d.price,
    d.loaded_datetime
from id_date_ranges as dr
join data as d
    on d.item_id = dr.item_id 
        and dr.start_date < d.end_date
        and d.start_date < dr.end_date
order by 1,2
;

enter image description here

And now we can filter the "worse" rows out, using QAULIFY again..

qualify row_number() over (partition by dr.item_id, dr.start_date 
                           order by d.loaded_datetime desc) = 1

thus the whole thing becomes:

with data (ITEM_ID, PRICE, START_DATE, END_DATE, LOADED_DATETIME) as (
    select * from values
    ('A', 1.00, '2023-01-01'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date),
    ('A', 2.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-15'::date, '2023-11-02'::date),
    ('B', 4.00, '2023-01-10'::date, '2023-01-31'::date, '2023-11-01'::date)
), dist_dates as (
    select distinct item_id, start_date from data
    union 
    select distinct item_id, end_date from data 
), id_date_ranges as (
    select 
        item_id, 
        start_date, 
        lead(start_date) over (partition by item_id order by start_date) as end_date
    from dist_dates
    qualify end_date is not null
)
select 
    dr.*,
    d.price,
    d.loaded_datetime
from id_date_ranges as dr
join data as d
    on d.item_id = dr.item_id 
        and dr.start_date < d.end_date
        and d.start_date < dr.end_date
qualify row_number() over (partition by dr.item_id, dr.start_date order by d.loaded_datetime desc) = 1
order by 1,2;

enter image description here

3
  • Very clever. Much better than my answer.
    – Error_2646
    Nov 21, 2023 at 23:14
  • there is a gotcha with this solution, if your slices are very overlapping, like the "bad" data example, you can have slices that are the same "best row" but now a cut into segments. Thus depending on your needs, you might want to do a rejoining phase also. Nov 21, 2023 at 23:52
  • I have written a solution to the "over sliced data problem" over here simeonpilgrim.com/blog/2023/11/22/sql-overlapping-time-ranges Nov 22, 2023 at 0:30

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