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I have the following frequency table of intervals:

Height (inches) Class Mark Frequency
0–10 5 5
10–20 15 18
20–30 25 12
30–40 35 6
40–50 45 9

For which I tried to create a histogram using the following R code:

# Example data frame for a continuous frequency table
df <- data.frame(
  ClassInterval = c("[0, 10)", "[10, 20)", "[20, 30)", "[30, 40)", "[40, 50)"),
  Frequency = c(5, 8, 12, 6, 9)
)

# Extract numeric values from class intervals
class_intervals <- gsub("\\[|\\)|\\(|\\]", "", df$ClassInterval)
class_midpoints <- sapply(strsplit(class_intervals, ","), function(x) mean(as.numeric(x)))

# Manually specify breaks based on unique values in ClassInterval
breaks <- as.numeric(gsub("\\[|\\)|\\(|\\]", "", unique(df$ClassInterval)))

# Create a histogram
hist(class_midpoints, breaks = breaks, weights = df$Frequency, col = "skyblue", xlab = "Value", main = "Continuous Frequency Histogram")

However, the command that creates breaks seems to generate only NAs, and consequently the hist gives me this error:

Error in hist.default(class_midpoints, breaks = breaks, weights = df$Frequency,  : 
  negative length vectors are not allowed
In addition: Warning messages:
1: In min(x) : no non-missing arguments to min; returning Inf
2: In max(x) : no non-missing arguments to max; returning -Inf
3: In min(h[h > 0]) : no non-missing arguments to min; returning Inf

Can someone please tell me what I'm doing wrong? And how to fix the problem? Thank you very much in advance.

6
  • 1
    What is your desired output of breaks ? At the moment, your gsub will return a character vector with each element having two numbers separated by a comma (ie, "0, 10") - if you wrap this in as.numeric("0, 10") it will return NA. In this example, do you want c(0, 10)?
    – jpsmith
    Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 14:13
  • 2
    As @jpsmith already mentioned, your desird output is unclear. Do you want with(df, barplot(height = Frequency, names.arg = ClassInterval))?
    – Friede
    Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 14:18
  • @jpsmith breaks should specify that the bars should cover the intervals: first bar covers 0-10, the second bar covers 10-20, and so on. Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 14:28
  • 2
    You already have the counts, hist is not appropriate for your problem. Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 14:40
  • 1
    Friede your command is good, but I would like to use the hist function instead of barplot. As @RuiBarradas wrote, this does not make any sense. I think my above suggested approach is what you can do.
    – Friede
    Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 14:47

1 Answer 1

1

Given your toy data, we can create a bar plot where we display the weighted frequencies against the point ranges ("Class Intervals"):

df <- data.frame(
  ClassInterval = c("[0, 10)", "[10, 20)", "[20, 30)", "[30, 40)", "[40, 50)"),
  Frequency = c(5, 8, 12, 6, 9)
)

with(df, barplot(height = Frequency / sum(Frequency), names.arg = ClassInterval, 
                 ylab = "Frequency", xlab = "Class Interval"))

Created on 2023-11-22 with reprex v2.0.2

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