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I was in an (probably false) assumption that enabling the right margin indicator in xib is equivalent to using UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin inside code and so on.

So, I used to think according to this snapshot: enter image description here

Later today I had to cross check, and stumbled upon this thread.

And also the apple documentation, entitled with the section with title - "Handling Layout Changes Automatically Using Autoresizing Rules" in this link: https://developer.apple.com/library/content/documentation/WindowsViews/Conceptual/ViewPG_iPhoneOS/CreatingViews/CreatingViews.html

So I now have a renewed concept in my mind as to how setting autoresizing masks programmatically would be equivalent to xib settings:

Scenario 1: Setting only (UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight) is equivalent to:

(UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight)

In XIB?

Scenario 2: Setting (UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin) in code is equivalent to:

(UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin)

In XIB?

Are my 2 renewed scenarios correct? Am I right now in my understanding?

6
  • 3
    You kidding me? But there seems to be where my confusion too. So if I wanna hug top I turn on the bottom autoresize. Good job apple. This is the most idiotic setup I have ever seen.
    – user4951
    Oct 16, 2012 at 6:27
  • 1
    If you want to hug top you have to make sure that you won't mention UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin in the bit mask code. My earlier assumption was wrong and thats why I had posted this question to clear stuff out. Oct 16, 2012 at 8:52
  • Your assumption is correct. Where are you wrong?
    – user4951
    Oct 16, 2012 at 9:28
  • Yes, the two scenarios you cite are correct.
    – user2568508
    Aug 3, 2013 at 14:15
  • 3
    I made a simple tool for this: erkanyildiz.me/lab/autoresizingmask you can use it. Jul 7, 2016 at 7:29

4 Answers 4

47

Yes, you have cited things correctly. Also, I agree that it feels a bit backwards, so for that reason I appreciate your post.

You might like using a preprocessor Macro UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleMargins when making a UIView's margin flexible in every direction. I put this in the precompiled header file so it gets included everywhere.

#define UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleMargins                 \
              UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin    | \
              UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin      | \
              UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin     | \
              UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin

Using UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleMargins will make a UI Element stay centered since it will NOT be hugging any one side. To make the element grow / shrink with its parent, set the UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth and UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight respectively.

I like using UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleMargins because I can later reference it like:

myView.autoresizingMask = UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleMargins;

instead of

myView.autoresizingMask = UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin;

All to often I see these margins OR'ed together on one line like the example above. Just hard to read.

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  • 4
    Flexible in every direction should be (UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight) I guess? Or am I confused again! Oct 19, 2011 at 5:39
  • 4
    FlexibleMargins will make the element stay centered (not hugging the left, top, right, or bottom margin). Flexible width / height will make the ui element grow / shrink respectively.
    – Sam
    Oct 19, 2011 at 17:50
  • 4
    Is everything clear now? Also, I really meant it when I said I appreciated your post. I actually favorited it b/c this has confused me in the past. I think it's a great Q.
    – Sam
    Oct 19, 2011 at 19:31
  • 3
    Yes, thanks, now I get it, "Flexible margins" and "Flexible width / height". That explains it all, and your "not hugging the left, top, right, or bottom margin" is a good way of explaining :) Oct 20, 2011 at 10:17
35

Yes, Interface Builder has it "reversed" in a sense (or UIView, depending on how you look at it). Your cited "scenarios" are correct.

0

enter image description here

Enabling the vertical/horizontal arrow (called spring) inside the box will make the height/width flexible. But enabling an outside line (called strut) will make that side inflexible/ non-flexible.

Enabling the outer left line (left strut) is not equivalent to enabling UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin. Instead, UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin = on if right strut disabled, off if right strut enabled.

It is quite confusing at first, but if you see closely, there is a difference in the springs and struts. I don't know why Apple did this, but for me, there were some cases where it was easier to use. And using opposite properties in code is even more confusing.

0

Swift 4 use this

gadBannerView?.autoresizingMask = [.flexibleRightMargin  , .flexibleLeftMargin , .flexibleTopMargin , .flexibleBottomMargin]

Objective-C

myView.autoresizingMask = UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin;
1
  • your set is equal to [.flexibleRightMargin, .flexibleBottomMargin] what makes the frame x,y, width and height constant. X and Y in UIKit relates to top left corner. Oct 23, 2020 at 19:32

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