36

I am trying to return pointer from a function. But I am getting segmentation fault. Someone please tell what is wrong with the code

#include<stdio.h>
int *fun();
main()
{
    int *ptr;
    ptr=fun();
    printf("%d",*ptr);

}
int *fun()
{
    int *point;
    *point=12;  
    return point;
}   
5
  • 14
    The most important question when dealing with pointers is: Pointer to what? A local object? Kaboom. A dynamically allocated object? Freed by whom? Some object stored somewhere else? Then how long does that object live and how long is my pointer valid? Returning a pointer from a function is especially fraught with risk, because the pointer is initialized in a totally different piece of code (that's often not even visible to the caller), and the callers do not know how to treat the result. A good documentation for such functions is very important.
    – sbi
    Oct 13, 2011 at 13:47
  • 2
    Just remember to always malloc any objects and pointers and datastructures. if you don't you'll always get a segmentation fault because it just says that we are not allocating any space for you.
    – Kevin
    Oct 13, 2011 at 14:07
  • 1
    When you "change mistake in code" you make the answer (partially) unrelated to the question. Code in question isn't perfect, that's the reason for the question. I strongly recommmend to avoid fixing any code in questions.
    – harper
    May 30, 2014 at 17:29
  • Hi, what exactly is the difference between doing it through malloc and doing it like *ptr = 12? Why does the former return a valid pointer to the caller even when declared locally inside the sender, while the latter doesn't?
    – SexyBeast
    Oct 3, 2015 at 12:30
  • @AttitudeMonger Because malloc says "I want some memory to store stuff in", but plain old *ptr = 12 says "I want some memory to do a calculation with, which can be used for other things later".
    – wizzwizz4
    Apr 9, 2016 at 10:46

4 Answers 4

47

Allocate memory before using the pointer. If you don't allocate memory *point = 12 is undefined behavior.

int *fun()
{
    int *point = malloc(sizeof *point); /* Mandatory. */
    *point=12;  
    return point;
}

Also your printf is wrong. You need to dereference (*) the pointer.

printf("%d", *ptr);
             ^
7
  • If have more than one values to store, what would I do? Whether I need to allocated all or I can just increment the pointer?
    – user567879
    Oct 15, 2011 at 1:42
  • @user567879 You need to malloc more space. Something like int *point = malloc(num_values * sizeof *point);
    – cnicutar
    Oct 15, 2011 at 6:30
  • 1
    Also int *point = calloc(num_values,sizeof(int)) will be useful. More info at thinkage.ca/english/gcos/expl/c/lib/calloc.html
    – tremendows
    Aug 6, 2013 at 8:42
  • Is it a good practice to return pointer from a function and make the main program to free the memory? Any other alternative to this? (only in case it is not a good practice) Jul 27, 2015 at 17:32
  • @cnicutar: It would be better if u cast the result of malloc (to int*) although it isn't necessary in C,
    – Destructor
    Aug 19, 2015 at 13:06
21

Although returning a pointer to a local object is bad practice, it didn't cause the kaboom here. Here's why you got a segfault:

int *fun()
{
    int *point;
    *point=12;  <<<<<<  your program crashed here.
    return point;
}

The local pointer goes out of scope, but the real issue is dereferencing a pointer that was never initialized. What is the value of point? Who knows. If the value did not map to a valid memory location, you will get a SEGFAULT. If by luck it mapped to something valid, then you just corrupted memory by overwriting that place with your assignment to 12.

Since the pointer returned was immediately used, in this case you could get away with returning a local pointer. However, it is bad practice because if that pointer was reused after another function call reused that memory in the stack, the behavior of the program would be undefined.

int *fun()
{
    int point;
    point = 12;
    return (&point);
}

or almost identically:

int *fun()
{
    int point;
    int *point_ptr;
    point_ptr = &point;
    *point_ptr = 12;
    return (point_ptr);
}

Another bad practice but safer method would be to declare the integer value as a static variable, and it would then not be on the stack and would be safe from being used by another function:

int *fun()
{
    static int point;
    int *point_ptr;
    point_ptr = &point;
    *point_ptr = 12;
    return (point_ptr);
}

or

int *fun()
{
    static int point;
    point = 12;
    return (&point);
}

As others have mentioned, the "right" way to do this would be to allocate memory on the heap, via malloc.

2
  • And free() it after use.
    – C--
    Oct 3, 2018 at 6:38
  • Will using static cause compilation warnings?
    – user12211554
    Jul 14, 2019 at 21:46
0

It is not allocating memory at assignment of value 12 to integer pointer. Therefore it crashes, because it's not finding any memory.

You can try this:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int *fun();

int main()
{
    int *ptr;
    ptr=fun();
    printf("\n\t\t%d\n",*ptr);
}

int *fun()
{
    int ptr;
    ptr=12;
    return(&ptr);
}
1
  • Doesn’t 12 exist only on the stack of that function call? That seems like it would produce undefined behavior
    – scape
    Nov 3, 2017 at 20:22
-1

To my knowledge the use of the keyword new, does relatively the same thing as malloc(sizeof identifier). The code below demonstrates how to use the keyword new.

    void main(void){
        int* test;
        test = tester();
        printf("%d",*test);
        system("pause");
    return;
}
    int* tester(void){
        int *retMe;
        retMe = new int;//<----Here retMe is getting malloc for integer type
        *retMe = 12;<---- Initializes retMe... Note * dereferences retMe 
    return retMe;
}
3
  • 1
    Never have developed in C but isn't new for C++? May 30, 2014 at 17:47
  • That is correct; however, I have found that new and delete have in fact worked with memory management in C. Jun 1, 2014 at 22:04
  • 1
    This is simply not correct. C doesn't have the keywords new or delete.
    – hgiesel
    Jul 4, 2016 at 21:48

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