0

I have a templated Base class with 2 virtual methods begin() and end().

I also have Derived1 class derived from Base class, and Derived2 class derived from Derived1 class.

I am overriding method begin() in first derived class, and method end() in second derived class.

But I cannot access/use the method end() in my first derived class. Why?

#include <iostream>

template <class T>
class Base {
public:
    virtual T begin() = 0;

    virtual T end() = 0;
};

template <class T>
class Derived1 : public Base<T> {
public:
    T begin() override {
        return Base<T>::end() - 10;     // not working
        // return end() - 10;           // also not working
    }
};

template <class T>
class Derived2 : public Derived1<T> {
public:
    T end() override {
        return 10;
    }
};

int main() {
    Derived2<int> derived2;
    std::cout << derived2.begin() << "\n";
    std::cout << derived2.end() << "\n";
}

Error LNK2019 unresolved external symbol "public: virtual int __cdecl Base<int>::end(void)" (?end@?$Base@H@@UEAAHXZ) referenced in function "public: virtual int __cdecl Derived1<int>::begin(void)" (?begin@?$Derived1@H@@UEAAHXZ)

4
  • A quick test on Godbolt shows it working fine. Which compiler and flags are you using?
    – Quentin
    Dec 2, 2023 at 16:40
  • 4
    Please edit your question so that it includes the whole error message, don't put that info into comments. Dec 2, 2023 at 16:47
  • @Quentin how can that be? Base is an abstract base class with pure virtual methods. The derived classes are still abstract and not concrete. Instantiating an abstract class will throw compile errors. Dec 3, 2023 at 4:25
  • @ChukwujiobiCanon Derived2 does end up implementing both functions, so it is not abstract. The reason I did not reproduce OP's error before they quoted it is that Godbolt.org does not link by default. The actual error is that Base::end() explicitly references Base's implementation of end, which is a thing you can do even with pure virtual functions, but which doesn't actually exist here.
    – Quentin
    Dec 3, 2023 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

0

Base::begin() and Base::end() are pure-virtual methods. You cannot use them because they have no definition.

return Base<T>::end() - 10; /* Will not work and will bring about compile errors.*/

Either provide a definition in Base or provide one in Derived1 and use that instead.

0
-2
#include <iostream>

template <class T>
class Base {
public:
    virtual T begin() = 0;
    virtual T end() = 0;
};

template <class T>
class Derived1 : public Base<T> {
public:
    T begin() override {
        return this->end() - 10;  // Access end() from the immediate base class
    }
};

template <class T>
class Derived2 : public Derived1<T> {
public:
    T end() override {
        return 10;
    }
};

int main() {
    Derived2<int> derived2;
    std::cout << derived2.begin() << "\n";
    std::cout << derived2.end() << "\n";
    return 0;
}
2
  • Mere code is not an answer. Youhave to explain.
    – user207421
    Dec 2, 2023 at 21:22
  • 3
    The comment on the begin() implementation is wrong: this->end() does not really access the version from the base class: it find the version in the base class but doesn't really call it. That wouldn't work anyway as the base class doesn't have an implementation. However, end() isn't a dependent name and this-> provides the dependency, causing end() to be looked up in class scope. It find the base class name which is a virtual function, causing the approprivate override to be called. Dec 2, 2023 at 22:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.