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I am trying to merge an array of individually sorted linked lists together to one sorted linked list (this is Leetcode problem 23, BTW). The linked list is defined as:

struct ListNode {
    int val;
    ListNode *next;
    ListNode() : val(0), next(nullptr) {}
    ListNode(int x) : val(x), next(nullptr) {}
    ListNode(int x, ListNode *next) : val(x), next(next) {}
};

And my function look like this:

ListNode* mergeKLists(vector<ListNode*> &lists) {
    ListNode *head = new ListNode(-1);
    ListNode *current = head;

    while (find_if(lists.begin(), lists.end(), [](ListNode *node) { return node; }) != lists.end()) {
        ListNode **pSmallest = nullptr;

        // find smallest node value
        for (int i = 0; i < lists.size(); i++) {
            ListNode *plist = lists.at(i);
            if (!plist) continue;
            if (!pSmallest) {
                pSmallest = new ListNode*;
                *pSmallest = plist;
            }
            else if (plist->val < (*pSmallest)->val) *pSmallest = plist;
        }

        // append smallest node to merged list
        current->next = *pSmallest;
        current = current->next;

        // advance in list with smallest node
        *pSmallest = (*pSmallest)->next;
        // ^^^^^^^^ this line does not do what I would expect
    }

    return head->next;
}

At the end of the function, I want to advance in the linked list with the smallest element. However, my code changes the pointer value *pSmallest only, without affecting the node of the linked list pSmallest is pointing to. How can I advance in the linked list pSmallest is pointing to?

I tried using references like this:

    // ...
    // find smallest node value
    for (int i = 0; i < lists.size(); i++) {
        ListNode *plist = lists.at(i);
        if (!plist) continue;
        if (!pSmallest) {
            pSmallest = &plist;
        }
        else if (plist->val < (*pSmallest)->val) pSmallest = &plist;
    }
    // ...

While this does bind the value of the smallest node in the input lists to pSmallest and, as such, update the corresponding node in the input linked list, it also changes its value the next loop iteration, where I'm trying to re-initialize pSmallest to the next smallest node in the input lists.

4
  • The reference approach does not work because plist is declared inside the for and you are taking its address... that's just a random stack address, not what you want. *pSmallest = ... is also undefined behavior because plist is already out of scope by the time you try to update it. Dec 2, 2023 at 18:17
  • Does leetcode let you use STL containers? Dec 2, 2023 at 19:02
  • 1
    When you asked this question on the Leetcode forums, what answers did you get?
    – Eljay
    Dec 2, 2023 at 19:58
  • Just use std::list forr doubly-linked, or std::forward_list for singly-linked lists. Both of them have a merge method that can be passed to std::ranges::fold_left or std::accumulate. The answer is a one-liner in C++.
    – Red.Wave
    Dec 2, 2023 at 20:15

1 Answer 1

0

By assigning to *pSmallest, you're not updating the entry in lists, and in your second attempt, &plist is an address that is not related to lists either, but is an address on the stack, during one loop's iteration. So that is not right either.

You could just remember the index i in the list where you found the least value, and use that to update the entry in lists:

ListNode* mergeKLists(vector<ListNode*> &lists) {
    ListNode *head = new ListNode(-1);
    ListNode *current = head;

    while (true) {
        int iSmallest = -1;

        // find smallest node value
        for (int i = 0; i < lists.size(); i++) {
            if (lists[i] && (iSmallest < 0 || lists[i]->val < lists[iSmallest]->val)) {
                iSmallest = i;
            }
        }
        if (iSmallest < 0) break; // All done
        // append smallest node to merged list
        current = current->next = lists[iSmallest];
        // Remove it from the list we took it from 
        lists[iSmallest] = lists[iSmallest]->next;
    }

    return head->next;
}

Note that this is not an efficient solution. The number of entries in lists could be large, and then it is a pity to have to iterate all of them to find the least value among them... over and over again.

To improve on this, there are several approaches, such as divide-and-conquer (merging 2 lists at a time) or the use of a priority queue (heap).

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