55

I'm looking for the simplest way of converting a query string from an HTTP GET request into a Dictionary, and back again.

I figure it's easier to carry out various manipulations on the query once it is in dictionary form, but I seem to have a lot of code just to do the conversion. Any recommended ways?

11 Answers 11

63

HttpUtility.ParseQueryString() parses query string into a NameValueCollection object, converting the latter to an IDictionary<string, string> is a matter of a simple foreach. This, however, might be unnecessary since NameValueCollection has an indexer, so it behaves pretty much like a dictionary.

  • and back again: stackoverflow.com/questions/829080/… – Rudi Aug 16 '12 at 12:06
  • 14
    Request.QueryString is Already a NameValueCollection, @H70 answer is the easiest for putting into a dictionary var parameters = Request.QueryString.Keys.Cast<string>().ToDictionary(k => k, v => Request.QueryString[v]); – johnny 5 Jan 29 '15 at 19:27
30

Here is how I usually do it

   Dictionary<string, string> parameters = HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString.Keys.Cast<string>()
                .ToDictionary(k => k, v => HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString[v]);
  • Easy and straightforward! Deserves a +1 :-) – Matt Feb 23 '16 at 8:58
  • for elegant answer – mzonerz Apr 12 '17 at 13:34
14

How about HttpUtility.ParseQueryString?

Just add a reference to System.Web.dll

  • Not in Silverlight :-( Copy/paste - here I come ... – mark Jul 28 '11 at 19:59
9

Just had to do this for a mono compatible solution

Regex.Matches(queryString, "([^?=&]+)(=([^&]*))?").Cast<Match>().ToDictionary(x => x.Groups[1].Value, x => x.Groups[3].Value)
  • Works for Windows Phone 8 too (the HttpUtility.ParseQueryString doesn't exist there too). – nemesisfixx Aug 12 '13 at 14:14
  • 1
    . . . and hope to hell your keys (Groups[1]) are unique. – Binary Worrier Aug 12 '13 at 14:44
  • @BinaryWorrier and if they're not a simple .GroupBy(x => x.Groups[1].Value).ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.First().Groups[3].Value); would work (with obvious data loss) – drake7707 Mar 28 '15 at 19:19
7

I like the brevity of Jon Canning's answer, but in the interest of variety, here is another alternative to his answer, that would also work for restricted environments like Windows Phone 8, that lack the HttpUtility.ParseQueryString() utility:

    public static Dictionary<string, string> ParseQueryString(String query)
    {
        Dictionary<String, String> queryDict = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        foreach (String token in query.TrimStart(new char[] { '?' }).Split(new char[] { '&' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries))
        {
            string[] parts = token.Split(new char[] { '=' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
            if (parts.Length == 2)
                queryDict[parts[0].Trim()] = HttpUtility.UrlDecode(parts[1]).Trim();
            else
                queryDict[parts[0].Trim()] = "";
        }
        return queryDict;
    }

Actually, a useful improvement to Canning's answer that take care of decoding url-encoded values (like in the above solution) is:

    public static Dictionary<string, string> ParseQueryString2(String query)
    {
       return Regex.Matches(query, "([^?=&]+)(=([^&]*))?").Cast<Match>().ToDictionary(x => x.Groups[1].Value, x => HttpUtility.UrlDecode( x.Groups[3].Value ));
    }
7

Same as Sean, but with Linq (and a function you can copy and paste):

public static Dictionary<string, string> ParseQueryString(string queryString)
{
   var nvc = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(queryString);
   return nvc.AllKeys.ToDictionary(k => k, k => nvc[k]);
}

Also, the question asked how to get it back into a query string:

public static string CreateQueryString(Dictionary<string, string> parameters)
{
   return string.Join("&", parameters.Select(kvp => 
      string.Format("{0}={1}", kvp.Key, HttpUtility.UrlEncode(kvp.Value))));
}
5

One liner without HttpUtility

var dictionary = query.Replace("?", "").Split('&').ToDictionary(x => x.Split('=')[0], x => x.Split('=')[1]);
  • Your code will make Exception when endwith ("&") – Anirudha Gupta Feb 27 '15 at 6:20
  • ok, I haven't thought of that use case. You could add .Where(x => !String.IsNullOrEmpty(x)) before the .ToDictionary to avoid that exception – vicentedealencar Mar 9 '15 at 19:38
  • You can simply add a StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries parameter to .Split('&'): .Split(new [] { '&' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries) – Rezgar Cadro Sep 27 '17 at 20:35
4

Yet another way to do it:

NameValueCollection nvcData = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(queryString);
Dictionary<string, string> dictData = new Dictionary<string, string>(nvcData.Count);
foreach (string key in nvcData.AllKeys)
{
    dictData.Add(key, nvcData.Get(key));
}
3

In ASP.NET Core, use ParseQuery.

var query = HttpContext.Request.QueryString.Value;
var queryDictionary = Microsoft.AspNetCore.WebUtilities.QueryHelpers.ParseQuery(query);
0

Most simple:

Dictionary<string, string> parameters = new Dictionary<string, string>();

for (int i = 0; i < context.Request.QueryString.Count; i++)
{
    parameters.Add(context.Request.QueryString.GetKey(i), context.Request.QueryString[i]);
}
  • Add a description to your code segment, Just the code block wont help much. – Billa Dec 5 '17 at 2:30
0

Instead of converting HttpContext.Request.QueryString to a Dictionary<>, try using

HttpContext.Request.Query which already is a Dictionary<string, StringValues>

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