10

I'm using C# 12. In C# 12 I can use primary constructor:

Implementation 1 :

public class Calculation(int a,int b)
{
  public int Addition() => a + b;
  public int Subtraction() => a - b;
}

Implementation 2 :

public class Calculation(int a,int b)
{
 private int _a { get; init; } = a;
 private int _b { get; init; } = b;
 public int Addition() => _a + _b;
 public int Subtraction() => _a - _b;
}

When I'm calling this method like :

console.WriteLine(new Calculation(10,25).Addition());

Both implementation working fine, so I'd like to know whether there is any advantage to using the longer Implementation 2 over the shorter Implementation 1.

10
  • 1
    I do think that this can be answered objectively (which I am willing to do, if nobody else wants to) - voting to reopen.
    – Heinzi
    Dec 6, 2023 at 9:57
  • 1
    Whether anything is better than something else is always going to be subjective unless you explicitly lay out what you mean by "better" using measurable metrics. Whether private properties are required will likely be a decision on code style. Which one do you prefer
    – phuzi
    Dec 6, 2023 at 9:57
  • @phuzi I prefer implementation 1 because its easy to understand, but I don't know any issues regarding this implementation. Dec 6, 2023 at 10:02
  • 3
    @Heinzi "Objective" only in sane places of employment. There's still plenty of nightmarish bodyshops with obtuse house-styles out there that just can't wait to mix the style of Implementation 2 with 5-line /// <summary> XML doc comments - and that's why the next Accenture UK NHS IT contract is 8 years behind schedule.
    – Dai
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:08
  • 1
    @Fildor: Thanks! Started to write, then got FGITW'd by Guru Stron. His answer is fine as well and also addresses the immutable aspect I wanted to mention, so that's fine with me. :-)
    – Heinzi
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:22

2 Answers 2

12

There is no point in creating fields/properties yourself this way, since the compiler will create them for you in this case (decompilation @sharplab.io).

From the Tutorial: Explore primary constructors doc (they use struct but the handling of the primary ctor for classes is basically the same):

public struct Distance(double dx, double dy)
{
   public readonly double Magnitude => Math.Sqrt(dx * dx + dy * dy);
   public readonly double Direction => Math.Atan2(dy, dx);

   public void Translate(double deltaX, double deltaY)
   {
      dx += deltaX;
      dy += deltaY;
   }

   public Distance() : this(0,0) { }
}

In the previous example, the primary constructor properties are accessed in a method. Therefore the compiler creates hidden fields to represent each parameter. The following code shows approximately what the compiler generates. The actual field names are valid CIL identifiers, but not valid C# identifiers.

public struct Distance
{
   private double __unspeakable_dx;
   private double __unspeakable_dy;

   public readonly double Magnitude => Math.Sqrt(__unspeakable_dx * __unspeakable_dx + __unspeakable_dy * __unspeakable_dy);
   public readonly double Direction => Math.Atan2(__unspeakable_dy, __unspeakable_dx);

   public void Translate(double deltaX, double deltaY)
   {
       __unspeakable_dx += deltaX;
       __unspeakable_dy += deltaY;
   }

   public Distance(double dx, double dy)
   {
       __unspeakable_dx = dx;
       __unspeakable_dy = dy;
   }
   public Distance() : this(0, 0) { }
}

The potential downside is that the generated field is mutable:

public class Calculation(int a, int b)
{
    public void Mutate() => a = 100;
    // ...
}

Though your approach does not fix that but introduces some clutter when you can confuse _a and a. There is no way to mark the generated field as readonly for now (but there are plans for the feature - see this LDM notes doc and this proposal) but you can shadow the ctor parameter by using field with the same name (or property):

public class Calculation2(int a, int b)
{
    private readonly int a = a;    
    private readonly int b = b;
    // public void Mutate() => a = 100; // does not compile
    public int Addition() => a + b;
    public int Subtraction() => a - b;
}

See also:

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  • 1
    I think you should change those struct types to class types
    – Dai
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:24
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    I really hate the fix for the mutable problem. (Not a criticism of your answer, but a criticism of Microsoft's current implementation.) Unless you know what it's fixing, private readonly int a = a; is a bit of a WTF. Dec 6, 2023 at 10:26
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    @MatthewWatson: They plan to fix this in early preview releases of C# 13.
    – Heinzi
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:28
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    @Heinzi Lucky number 13, eh? (after reading the LDM notes, I'm pleased that at least the team is aware of the underpants-on-head levels of utility we're getting from these fatally compromised record types and "primary" ctors - too bad we can't roll-back to C# 8.0 and start-over (or can we?)
    – Dai
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:30
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    Even if you do not "shadow", the constructor parameters are not turned into autogenerated fields unless some place in the class other than a field initializer "captures" them. So in the example public class Calculation3(int a, int b) { private readonly int _a = a; private readonly int _b = b; /* ... */ }, where I use new names _a and _b, if no method or property mentions a and b without underscores, these are not "promoted" to automatic fields. (But as soon as some method does, they are.) I know this is also what you mean, but I just wanted to make it very clear. Dec 6, 2023 at 10:46
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Advantages of the 2nd implementation:

  1. It consists of more lines of code. (Useful if you are getting paid by the line of code written.)
  2. It is more difficult to read. (Direct result of being longer.)
  3. It introduces some entirely unnecessary private properties, which replace the fields that the compiler would otherwise create to store the constructor parameters, thus making it run slightly slower on debug runs, which tend to be unoptimized.
  4. It opens up the possibility that in different places of your code you will inadvertently access both the constructor parameter and the private property, thus causing that parameter to occupy double storage.
  5. It gives python programmers a warm fuzzy feeling by shoe-horning into an otherwise fine coding style the "prefix privates with underscore" convention which might be necessary in python but is entirely unwarranted in C#.
  6. It largely defeats the very purpose of having a default constructor in the first place.
8
  • 1
    +1 - though re: point 5: underscore prefixed names are still useful in C# to denote static fields (as opposed to using this. for instance fields) - (I'm just glad the former-VB.NET acolytes stopped using m_ *shudder*)
    – Dai
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:33
  • @Dai also in python as far as I remember it is usually double underscore for such stuff =)
    – Guru Stron
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:36
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    @Dai underscores make code look unnecessarily technical. They should have been abandoned ever since the human race advanced past the C-language stage. Using this. for instance fields is another entirely unwarranted perversion. You don't need this.. For telling the difference between static fields and instance fields we have, since the start of the current millenium, syntax highlighting. If you are finding that your syntax highlighting is not giving you enough of a visual clue, consider switching to dark mode, which magnifies its effect.
    – Mike Nakis
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:37
  • @MikeNakis C# program code cannot be reliably syntax-colored, e.g. if a static field is declared in another partial in a different file that the editor doesn't have open - or online here on StackOverflow where 90% of the time C# gets treated as B+W plaintext even with triple-backticked langtags. It gets worse with .NET 6's "top-level code" abomination.
    – Dai
    Dec 6, 2023 at 10:39
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    @MikeNakis This. As someone who has a color assigned to pretty much every type of member and structure, I find it very annoying when people find the need something like mAge so they know its a member field. I can see this being in issue if your coding in MS Word, but just assign different colors and you'll never be confused again. I can even tell apart a local from a member from a static from an enum etc. And even if youre still not clear, you can always mouse over the identiifier. 22 hours ago

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