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I am trying to calculate the square root of big numbers (around 16 digits) using the Big_Reals package. I have the following square root function which uses the Newton-Raphson method

pragma Ada_2022;
with Ada.Numerics.Big_Numbers.Big_Reals;
use Ada.Numerics.Big_Numbers.Big_Reals;

function Big_Sqrt(X: Big_Real) return Big_Real is
    package Converter is new Float_Conversions(Float);
    use Converter;
    Z: Big_Real := X;
    Big_Half: Big_Real := To_Big_Real(0.5);
begin
    for I in 1..32 loop
        Z := Big_Half * (Z+X/Z);
        Put_Line(Z'Image);
    end loop;
    return Z;
end Big_Sqrt;

The output with input 1813789079679324 is

906894539839662.500
453447269919832.249
226723634959918.124
113361817479963.062
56680908739989.531
28340454370010.765
14170227185037.382

raised STORAGE_ERROR : Ada.Numerics.Big_Numbers.Big_Integers.Bignums.Normalize: big integer limit exceeded

I'm assuming this happens because although the whole part of the number is getting smaller there is too much space being used for the decimal part but I can't find a way to reduce the precision of the decimal part.

2 Answers 2

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As you have observed here, Ada support for big numbers offers arbitrary precision but not arbitrary size; some details on the limits are discussed here. Truncating intermediate, undesired results is a reasonable approach. In addition,

Iteration: Note that the approach converges. Instead of iterating for a fixed number of loops, consider exiting the loop when the difference falls below a specified threshold, Epsilon in the first example below. A related example is shown here.

Output Precision: Note that the Big_Reals function To_String provides output control for the number of digits after the decimal point. The first example below compares 64 digit results with known values. A related example is seen here.

Available Precision: Also examine the suitability the precision available on the target platform. The implementation-defined value of Max_Digits may be found in the System package; the second example below illustrates your result.

Big_Sqrt:

--https://stackoverflow.com/q/77623041/230513
pragma Ada_2022;
with Ada.Numerics.Big_Numbers.Big_Reals;
use Ada.Numerics.Big_Numbers.Big_Reals;
with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Big_Sqrt is

   N : constant Natural := 64;

   function Sqrt (X : Big_Real) return Big_Real is
      Epsilon  : constant Big_Real := 1.0 / 10.0**N;
      One_Half : constant Big_Real := 0.5;
      Z0       : Big_Real          := X;
      Z1       : Big_Real;
   begin
      loop
         Z1 := One_Half * (Z0 + X / Z0);
         exit when Z0 - Z1 < Epsilon;
         Z0 := Z1;
      end loop;
      return Z1;
   end Sqrt;

   procedure Compare_Square_Root (S1, S2 : String) is
      V1 : constant Big_Real := Sqrt (From_String (S1));
      V2 : constant Big_Real := From_String (S2);
   begin
      Put_Line (To_String (V1, 0, N));
      Put_Line (To_String (V2, 0, N));
   end Compare_Square_Root;

begin
   Compare_Square_Root
     ("2.0",
      "1.4142135623730950488016887242096980785696718753769480731766797379");
   Compare_Square_Root
     ("5.0",
      "2.2360679774997896964091736687312762354406183596115257242708972454");
end Big_Sqrt;

Console:

$ ./obj/big_sqrt 
1.4142135623730950488016887242096980785696718753769480731766797379
1.4142135623730950488016887242096980785696718753769480731766797379
2.2360679774997896964091736687312762354406183596115257242708972454
2.2360679774997896964091736687312762354406183596115257242708972454

Stock_Sqrt:

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;
with Ada.Numerics.Generic_Elementary_Functions;
with System;

procedure Stock_Sqrt is

   type Real is digits System.Max_Digits;
   package Real_IO is new Float_IO (Real);
   package Functions is new Ada.Numerics.Generic_Elementary_Functions (Real);

begin
   Put_Line ("Max_Digits:" & System.Max_Digits'Image);
   Real_IO.Put (Functions.Sqrt (1_813_789_079_679_324.0), 0, 4, 0);
   New_Line;
end Stock_Sqrt;

Console:

$ ./obj/stock_sqrt
Max_Digits: 18
42588602.6970
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  • 1
    That seems like a much cleaner way to do it, thank you
    – Henry
    Commented Dec 10, 2023 at 16:36
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A fixed precision decimal part can be achieved by multiplying by 10 for each digit after the decimal point, converting it to a Big_Integer, converting it back to a Big_Real and then dividing by the original multiplier. The Big_Sqrt function becomes

function Big_Sqrt(X: Big_Real) return Big_Real is
    package Converter is new Float_Conversions(Float);
    use Converter;
    Z: Big_Real := X;
    Make_4dp: Big_Real := To_Big_Real(10000);
    Big_Half: Big_Real := To_Big_Real(0.5);
begin
    for I in 1..32 loop
        Z := Big_Half * (Z+X/Z) * Make_4dp;
        Z := To_Big_Real(Numerator(Z)/Denominator(Z))/Make_4dp;
    end loop;
    return Z;
end Big_Sqrt;

This will truncate to 4 decimal points by multiplying by 10^4 = 10000, converting to a Big_Integer by dividing the numerator by the denominator (both of which are Big_Integer, making the result Big_Integer), converting it back to a Big_Real and then dividing by 10000. I could not find a better way to convert a Big_Real to a Big_Integer but this seems to work.

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