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this is some bash code I wrote to check for an existing directory and make it if it didn't exist. It seems a bit clunky to me, so I'm wondering if people have tips??

dir_check () {
    # this is a function for checking if a simulation directory exists and if 
    for i in $@
    do
        vers_num=1
        # echo "$i \n"
        if [ -d "$i" ]; then
            if [ -d "$i-run-$vers_num" ]; then
                while [ -d "$i-run-$vers_num" ]; do
                    ((vers_num++))
                    new_dir="$i-run-$vers_num"
                done
            else
                new_dir="$i-run-$vers_num"
            fi

            mkdir "$new_dir"
            echo "$new_dir created"
        else 
            mkdir $i
            echo "$i created"
        
        fi

    done
}

just looking for feedback on this code

6
  • 4
    If this is otherwise working code then you may be looking for Code Review.
    – David
    Dec 8, 2023 at 11:41
  • 4
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! @David, the question needs work before it's suited to Code Review. You could have pointed the asker at A guide to Code Review for Stack Overflow users, as some things are done differently over there - e.g. we need a good description of the purpose of the code to give context, and question titles should simply say what the code is for (the question is always, "How can I improve this?"). It's important that the code works correctly; include the unit tests if possible. Dec 8, 2023 at 11:48
  • 2
    Is it really important, the the version number does not have leading zeroes? Dec 8, 2023 at 11:49
  • 3
    The bare $@ is an error; probably try shellcheck.net before asking for human assistance.
    – tripleee
    Dec 8, 2023 at 13:46
  • 1
    You will want leading zeros to preserve directory sort order. In bash printf -v d_vers_num "%03d" "$((vers_num++))" will create d_vers_num=001 from vers_num=1 and advance vers_num by 1 afterwards. Use new_dir="$i-run-$d_vers_num" Now when you list the directory your subdirectory numbers will be in natural order. (instead of 1, 10, 11, ..., 2 ...) Dec 8, 2023 at 14:03

2 Answers 2

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  • use continue to shorten the logic
  • calculate the next version with a pipeline
  • if it doesn't exist, echo message and create
dir_check() {
  for i in "$@"
  do
    test ! -d "$i" && { mkdir $i ; continue ; }
    local ver=$( { ls -d "$i"-run-* 2>&- || echo 0; }  | sed "s:$i-run-::" | sort -nr | head -1)
    ((ver++))
    test ! -d "$i-run-$ver" && { mkdir "$i-run-$ver" ; echo "$i-run-$ver 
  created" ; }
  done
}
0

Some comments are opinions depend on the style, take it or leave it.

dir_check () {
    # local variable to avoid side effects
    # a meaningful name rather than 'i'
    local dir
    for dir in "$@"; do

        # the condition was inverted
        # to avoid the else far from condition
        # and allows to reduce nesting with continue, break or return depending on the situation
        if [[ ! -d "$dir" ]]; then
            mkdir "$dir"
            echo "$dir created"
            continue
        fi
        
        local vers_num=1 new_dir
        # to avoid repeating instruction can be put in a sequence
        # while or until only the exit status used for the condition is the last of the sequence 
        until new_dir="$dir-run-$((vers_num++))"; [[ ! -d "$new_dir" ]]; do
            :
        done

        mkdir "$new_dir"
        echo "$new_dir created"

    done
}

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