2

I have a 4D vector: std::array<float, 4>

I want to check if all it's components are inside the value range: 0.0f <= X && X < 256.0f

How do I check if any of the vector components are outside of this range? All I need is a single bool to know if that whole vector passes or fails the test.

My first attempt to solve this was the following piece of code:

bool Check_If_Outside_2(std::array<float, 4> vec)
{
    bool outside = false;

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        if (vec[i] < VType(0) || vec[i] >= VType(256))
            outside = true;

    return outside;
}

Which resulted in this assembler output:

Check_If_Outside_2(std::array<float, 4ul>):  # @Check_If_Outside_2(std::array<float, 4ul>)
        vxorps  xmm2, xmm2, xmm2
        vucomiss        xmm0, xmm2
        setb    al
        vmovss  xmm3, dword ptr [rip + .LCPI7_0] # xmm3 = mem[0],zero,zero,zero
        vucomiss        xmm0, xmm3
        setae   cl
        or      cl, al
        vmovshdup       xmm0, xmm0              # xmm0 = xmm0[1,1,3,3]
        vucomiss        xmm0, xmm2
        setb    dl
        vucomiss        xmm0, xmm3
        setae   al
        or      al, dl
        or      al, cl
        vxorps  xmm0, xmm0, xmm0
        vcmpltps        xmm0, xmm1, xmm0
        vpermilps       xmm0, xmm0, 212         # xmm0 = xmm0[0,1,1,3]
        vmovaps xmm2, xmmword ptr [rip + .LCPI7_1] # xmm2 = <2.56E+2,2.56E+2,u,u>
        vcmpleps        xmm1, xmm2, xmm1
        vpermilps       xmm1, xmm1, 212         # xmm1 = xmm1[0,1,1,3]
        vorps   xmm0, xmm0, xmm1
        vpsllq  xmm0, xmm0, 63
        vmovmskpd       ecx, xmm0
        or      al, cl
        shr     cl
        or      al, cl
        and     al, 1
        ret

Then I tried the following optimized version, which uses the idea, that negative integer values fill the top bits in the register. So I simply convert the floats into integers and test the high bits if any of them are non-zero. If there are non-zero bits, the vector's component is either negative or above the legal maximum range.

template<typename T, unsigned long N>
static inline std::array<int32_t, N> To_Int_Vec(const std::array<T, N>& x)
{
    std::array<int32_t, N> int_vec;

    for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        int_vec[i] = floor(x[i]);

    return int_vec;
}


bool Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4> vec)
{
    constexpr int32_t neg_mask = ~255;

    auto vec_int = To_Int_Vec(vec);

    bool outside = false;

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        if (vec_int[i] & neg_mask)
            outside = true;

    return outside;
}

Which gave the following assembler output:

Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4ul>):    # @Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4ul>)
        vshufps xmm0, xmm0, xmm1, 65            # xmm0 = xmm0[1,0],xmm1[0,1]
        vroundps        xmm0, xmm0, 9
        vcvttps2dq      xmm0, xmm0
        vpshufd xmm1, xmm0, 78                  # xmm1 = xmm0[2,3,0,1]
        vpor    xmm0, xmm0, xmm1
        vpshufd xmm1, xmm0, 229                 # xmm1 = xmm0[1,1,2,3]
        vpor    xmm0, xmm0, xmm1
        vmovd   eax, xmm0
        cmp     eax, 255
        seta    al
        ret

I would assume that this kind of test should still be possible to optimize much further using Intel SIMD instructions, but I'm not sure how to do it. Is it possible to handle it any better in pure C++ or are intrinsics required, or even inline assembler? Or is it even possible to optimize it any further?

To see the optimized output, I'm using x86-64 clang 11.0.0, with compiler flags: -O3 -mtune=skylake -ffast-math -funsafe-math-optimizations -fno-math-errno -msse4.1 -mavx -mfma4

EDIT: Issue solved with your help! Thank you!

10
  • I’m voting to close this question because this seems more suitable for codereview.stackexchange.com Dec 9, 2023 at 13:55
  • 1
    Also, before you're trying to find more "optimal" or "efficient" ways, you need to measure, profile and benchmark an optimized build, to make sure it's one of the top two or three bottlenecks in your program. If it's not then it's probably not worth to bother about. Dec 9, 2023 at 14:04
  • 3
    You could start by passing vec as a const reference instead of by value. Dec 9, 2023 at 14:09
  • 3
    Update your Clang! This will save you from wasting your time manually optimizing a code which is optimized in the newer versions (since Clang 15 apparently). Dec 9, 2023 at 14:10
  • 2
    Why are you using -mtune=skylake -mfma4? Only AMD CPUs ever had FMA4, so if the compiler uses any of those, your code won't run on Intel (or on Zen2 or later). You might as well use -march=bdver1 to actually tune for Bulldozer since that and Zen 1 are the only CPUs that will run code built this way. (If the compiler ever contracts any mul+add to FMA4). The mainstream FMA extension is FMA3, enabled as part of -march=x86-64-v3. Dec 9, 2023 at 15:26

2 Answers 2

6

Using SIMD directly even seems simpler than the original code:

bool Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4> vec)
{
    __m128 v = _mm_loadu_ps(vec.data());
    __m128 tooHigh = _mm_cmpge_ps(v, _mm_set1_ps(256));
    return _mm_movemask_ps(_mm_or_ps(v, tooHigh));
}

Resulting code (at least the way I compiled it):

Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4ul>):    # @Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4ul>)
        vmovlhps        xmm0, xmm0, xmm1                # xmm0 = xmm0[0],xmm1[0]
        vbroadcastss    xmm1, dword ptr [rip + .LCPI1_0] # xmm1 = [2.56E+2,2.56E+2,2.56E+2,2.56E+2]
        vcmpleps        xmm1, xmm1, xmm0
        vorps   xmm0, xmm0, xmm1
        vmovmskps       eax, xmm0
        test    eax, eax
        setne   al
        ret

So we skip the conversion to integers, and instead of doing a horizontal-OR we rely on vmovmskps.

Another idea, based on comparing the floats by their raw bit pattern,

bool Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4> vec)
{
    __m128i v = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)vec.data());
    __m128i bits256 = _mm_set1_epi32(0x43800000);
    __m128i cmp = _mm_cmpeq_epi32(_mm_min_epu32(v, bits256), bits256);
    return _mm_movemask_ps(_mm_castsi128_ps(cmp));
}

Either way I am blatantly ignoring the existence of negative zero, and of NaN but -ffast-math already ignores NaN anyway.

uiCA results for Skylake, if I pretend that the input comes from memory (instead of shuffling them together from registers - to break any accidental dependency):

  • Original: 3.39
  • Version 1, floating point compare: 2.0
  • Version 2, integer compare: 2.0
  • this from the comments: 3.21
  • this from the comments: 3.00 (it gets a bit worse when AVX2 is enabled)

In all cases this is only some rough indication. The code here is analyzed by itself, not in any real context, but throughput is context-dependent (it affects eg execution port pressure). Also, the setcc should disappear in most real usages (where this function is inlined into the caller and the condition is immediately branched on). And shuffling the function arguments together into one vector (or loading the input from memory, which I used to do the uiCA analysis) would be replaced by whatever actually produces the input.

5
  • uiCA's "throughput" calculation actually is based on treating this as a loop body, with a dependency chain through XMM0 in this case (since the calling convention passes std::array<float, 4> in XMM0 and XMM1, which is also why a vmovhlps is part of this; it wouldn't be after inlining.) Based on front-end throughput and back-end ports alone, it's 1.33 cycles per array on Skylake because of vector execution ports (leaving out the test/setne part, otherwise that would be a front-end bottleneck. Returning a 0 / non-zero int could just return the movemask result) Dec 9, 2023 at 15:12
  • Worth mentioning that this treats -0.0 as outside the range, unlike an IEEE comparison where +0.0 <= -0.0 is true. This is probably fine for many use-cases, and a good optimization to OR the compare results with the original floats that might have their sign bit set. It also won't reject +NaN since your 256.0 <= X is false, and the sign bit is clear. Dec 9, 2023 at 15:17
  • @PeterCordes that accidental dep got me good, but it's out now. I ignored -0 and NaN yea, OP compiles with -ffast-math so I think that's allowed
    – user555045
    Dec 9, 2023 at 15:44
  • 1
    Good point that they're compiling with -ffast-math which implies -ffinite-math-only -fno-signed-zeros, so they're already assuming non-NaN. -fno-signed-zeros means the sign of a 0.0 might be "wrong", but doesn't normally allow treating -0.0 < +0.0. Still, I agree they're probably fine with it. Either way, good to mention these things so future readers can be aware of them; not everyone solving this problem will be doing so with -ffast-math. Dec 9, 2023 at 15:50
  • To rule out NaNs as well, you can use _mm_cmpnlt_ps instead of _mm_cmpge_ps -- when compiling with -ffinite-math-only, the compiler might switch that back to _mm_cmpge_ps/cmpleps, of course.
    – chtz
    Dec 9, 2023 at 23:59
3

If you accept that -0.0f is considered as outside, you can exploit that only for abs(x)>=2.0f (or for NaNs) the highest bit of the exponent is set, and for negative inputs (including (-0.0f) the sign bit is set.

Thus, after scaling your vector by 1.f/128.f you can check if any element has either of the highest bits sets, which can be done by a ptest against a mask with the upper bits set.

bool Check_If_Outside(std::array<float, 4> const & vec)
{
    __m128 v = _mm_loadu_ps(vec.data());
    __m128 v_scaled = _mm_mul_ps(v, _mm_set1_ps(1.f/128.f));
    __m128i mask = _mm_set1_epi32(0xc0000000);
    return !_mm_testz_si128(_mm_castps_si128(v_scaled), mask);
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.