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I have hundreds of dictionaries where all the values of all the dictionaries need to be incremented by 1. What is the most performant way to do that in C#?

I thought of iterating through the keys using foreach, but using the key to find each variable is not efficient.

Using KeyValuePair also doesn't work because KeyValuePair is readonly.

        foreach (var kvp in this)
        {
            kvp.Value += 1;
        }

iterating through the Values property also doesnt work inside a foreach loop

        foreach (var i in this.Values)
        {
            i += 1;
        }

This also doesnt work because ICollection is not indexable apparently.

        for(int i=0; i< this.Values.Count();i++)
        {
            this.Values[i] += 1;
        }
2
  • Are all values added at once, or do different values exist at different times? In the first case, the quickest option is to keep a separate offset integer that gets applied to all values, and just Increment that. For the second, another option is to think in terms of some generational counter, and assign the current counter value when added - then just change the generational counter in your "increment everything" logic; the difference between current and the one at storage is the number you want, i.e. the number of times everything has been logically (but not actually) incremented Dec 13, 2023 at 7:59
  • they all are added at once. Dec 13, 2023 at 10:54

3 Answers 3

3

they all are added at once.

In that case the fastest option is: don't. Store a separate int field that is the common count that has been (logically) added to all values, and simply add that to any per-element count (if any) whenever reading the value:

private readonly Dictionary<Whatever, int> _counts = ...
private int _globalCountOffset;

public void IncrementAll(int count = 1)
    => _globalCountOffset += count; // Interlocked if required

public int GetCount(Whatever key)
    => GetInternalElementCount(key) + _globalCountOffset;
1

I would argue that simple iteration trough key-value pairs should be enough:

foreach (var kvp in dict)
{
    dict[kvp.Key] = kvp.Value + 1;
}

But if this is really perfromance-critical path you can consider using CollectionsMarshal class to try to speed up the execution a bit (though it seems to have little effect compared to key-value pairs iteration):

foreach (var kvp in dict)
{
    ref var valueRefOrNullRef = ref CollectionsMarshal.GetValueRefOrNullRef(dict, kvp.Key);
    valueRefOrNullRef++; // we don't check for null ref since we are sure key is present
}

Sample benchmark (using BenchmarkDotNet):

[MemoryDiagnoser]
public class DictIncrement
{
    private Dictionary<int, int> Dictionary = Enumerable.Range(0, 1000)
        .ToDictionary(i => i);

    [Benchmark]
    public void ForeachKeys()
    {
        foreach (var k in Dictionary.Keys)
        {
            Dictionary[k] += 1;
        }
    }
    
    [Benchmark]
    public void ForeachKvp()
    {
        foreach (var kvp in Dictionary)
        {
            Dictionary[kvp.Key] = kvp.Value + 1;
        }
    }
    
    [Benchmark]
    public void ForeachKeysCollectionMarshal()
    {
        foreach (var k in Dictionary.Keys)
        {
            ref var valueRefOrNullRef = ref CollectionsMarshal.GetValueRefOrNullRef(Dictionary, k);
            valueRefOrNullRef++;
        }
    }
    
    [Benchmark]
    public void ForeachKvpCollectionsMarshal()
    {
        foreach (var kvp in Dictionary)
        {
            ref var valueRefOrNullRef = ref CollectionsMarshal.GetValueRefOrNullRef(Dictionary, kvp.Key);
            valueRefOrNullRef++;
        }
    }
}

Gives the following on my machine:

Method Mean Error StdDev Allocated
ForeachKeys 11.405 us 0.2264 us 0.2224 us -
ForeachKvp 7.875 us 0.0891 us 0.0744 us -
ForeachKeysCollectionMarshal 6.971 us 0.1329 us 0.1178 us -
ForeachKvpCollectionsMarshal 7.305 us 0.1184 us 0.1454 us -

Note that you need to measure performance on your actual set up (hardware, framework versions) and actual data samples (types, data).

5
  • 1
    Implementation of ForeachKvp is incorrect. Also, the numbers are a bit misleading due to missing GC information. The most relevant cost here will come from touching the Keys property since it will allocate a whole list. See source here.
    – l33t
    Dec 12, 2023 at 23:07
  • @l33t thanks for noticing. Will fix ForeachKvp now but the rest will require a bit more looking into BenchmarkDotNet options since I use the same dictionary the cost should be "one-time" in my case so the test will need improvement for the cases when working with different dictionaries (i.e. allocation will happen multiple times)
    – Guru Stron
    Dec 12, 2023 at 23:14
  • 1
    @l33t also it seems that it does not allocate the whole list, just a small wrapper - see
    – Guru Stron
    Dec 12, 2023 at 23:18
  • Right. Slightly inaccurate from my side then. But the allocation is there, and unnecessary. When dealing with many, many temporary dictionaries on a hot path, it will have an impact though.
    – l33t
    Dec 13, 2023 at 0:22
  • ​@l33t it's not unnecessary, and Guru Stron's benchmark proves it (​ForeachKeysCollectionMarshal vs ForeachKvpCollectionsMarshal). Enumerating the keys is cheaper than enumerating key-value pairs. The difference would be even more profound if the TValue was a large struct instead of an int. Dec 13, 2023 at 0:43
0

Currently (.NET 8) the Dictionary<TKey,TValue> collection doesn't provide direct sequential access to the underlying storage of its keys and values, so you can't really avoid the hashing overhead of accessing each entry by key. If you are feeling adventurous, you could use reflection and interact directly with the private Entry[]? _entries; field of the collection (source code). Here is an implementation of an UpdateAll extension method for dictionaries:

public static void UpdateAll<TKey, TValue>(this Dictionary<TKey, TValue> source,
    Func<TKey, TValue, TValue> update)
{
    ArgumentNullException.ThrowIfNull(source);
    int count = (int)typeof(Dictionary<TKey, TValue>)
        .GetField("_count", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
        .GetValue(source);
    object entriesObj = typeof(Dictionary<TKey, TValue>)
        .GetField("_entries", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
        .GetValue(source);
    Entry<TKey, TValue>[] entries = Unsafe.As<Entry<TKey, TValue>[]>(entriesObj);
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        ref Entry<TKey, TValue> entry = ref entries[i];
        if (entry.Next >= -1)
        {
            entry.Value = update(entry.Key, entry.Value);
        }
    }
}

private struct Entry<TKey, TValue>
{
    public uint HashCode;
    public int Next;
    public TKey Key;
    public TValue Value;
}

Usage example:

dict.UpdateAll((key, value) => value + 1);

Online demo.

This approach has obvious disadvantages. First of all it's brittle. There is no guarantee that the current (.NET 8) implementation of the Dictionary<TKey,TValue> will remain unchanged in future .NET versions. Any such change might cause the above UpdateAll to malfunction. There is also the cost of using reflection, which for small dictionaries might surpass the cost of hashing the keys. I haven't benchmarked the above implementation.

Relevant GitHub issue: [API Proposal]: CollectionsMarshal method that enumerates dictionary by reference to avoid unnecessary hash calculation.

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