22

I have 10 stored procedures as follows: SP1,SP2,.....,SP10 These stored procedures do some stuff. I need to run these procedures as follows: EXECUTE SP1; EXECUTE SP2; ... EXECUTE SP10;

When SQL server finshes to complete execution of these procedures, it gives ten lines showing any row changes caused by all these stored procedures. What i want to do is that after Execution of all stored procedures SQL Server also gives in output window the execution time for each Stored Procedures. Can i do this? I am sure that for achieving this task i need to modify stored procedures but i don't have any idea how to do it... Please help me. Thanks.

  • 1
    Are you calling the stored procedure from your custom written app? If so, what language? – Koekiebox Oct 14 '11 at 11:27
14

You can use Sql Server Profiler for this purposes it provides a lot of useful info along the each executed query and Stored procedure as well.

MSDN: SQL Profiler Data Columns

SQL Profiler displays the execution time for each event

An other straightforward way:

  1. DECLARE 2 datetime variables: start/end
  2. SET start = GETDATE()
  3. EXEC SP_NAME
  4. SET end = GETDATE()
  5. Execution time - difference between end and start
  • 1
    The Data Column Description link now points to "SQL Server 2000 Retired Technical documentation". The first link (to Sql Server Profiler) still works. I don't have permission to edit the answer. – J. Chris Compton Apr 23 '18 at 15:31
26

Assuming management studio or some other environment with an output pane you can;

SET STATISTICS TIME ON
EXEC SP1
EXEC SP2
...
SET STATISTICS TIME OFF
7
declare @start datetime = getdate()

-- your SQL statements
exec dbo.MyStoredProcedure

declare @executionTimeInMilliseconds int = datediff(ms, @start, getdate())
4

There are ways to do this using tools such as Sql Server profiler, but a simple way is to run each proc surrounded with a line to print the time:

print convert(varchar, getdate(), 21)
EXEC PROC SP1
print convert(varchar, getdate(), 21)
  • why would you convert to varchar ??? Basically what you should do is take the millisecond difference from before and after running the procedure – t-clausen.dk Oct 14 '11 at 11:30
  • Simply so you can get a formatted output such as 2011-10-14 12:32:39.403. Leaving it as datetime won't necessarily give you the milliseconds, and reporting only the difference loses the extra data of when it was run, in case it's unattended. – Widor Oct 14 '11 at 11:33
  • thanks... almost each methods worked!!! – Azeem Oct 17 '11 at 9:10
2

You don't need to modify the SPs code at all. The following query gives you some stats about SPs execution times.

SELECT 
   DB_NAME(database_id) [database],
   OBJECT_NAME(object_id) [stored_procedure],
   cached_time, 
   last_execution_time, 
   execution_count,
   total_elapsed_time/execution_count [avg_elapsed_time],
   [type_desc]
FROM sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats
--WHERE OBJECT_NAME(object_id) IN ('SP1','SP2','SP3','SP4','SP5')
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time desc;

Just try it.

1

capture and display execution time

use two parameter of datetime type and set one using getdate() before start of tsql in stored procedure

and set second using getdate() after tsql and finally use datediff function to get the difference

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