4

I have issues understanding when does a type deduce to std::ranges::dangling when using named local variables vs a prvalue as arguments to std::ranges::sort algorithm . For example I have function that returns a prvalue to a standard container, say std::vector which I use directly as an argument to std::ranges::sort, then I expect to get a compilation error regarding std::ranges::dangling when I attempt to dereference the iterator, which is what I get :

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

auto get_data(){
    return std::vector<int>{1, 2, 99, 5, 9, 4};
}

auto get_sorted(){
    return std::ranges::sort(get_data());
}


int main(){
    auto it = get_sorted();
    *(it-1); //Compiler Error because it is a std::ranges::dangling iterator
}

However if I change the get_sorted function above slightly to first capture the vector in a named variable and use that instead to return the result of std::ranges::sort, then I don't get a dangling iterator, in the main even though the allocated vector in named variable should have been destroyed after the function get_sorted returned :

auto get_sorted(){
    auto vec = get_data();
    return std::ranges::sort(vec);
}


int main(){
    auto it = get_sorted();
    *(it-1); //Okay result  = 99
}

Even if I change get_sorted to use a named variable based container declared locally, I get a behavior where the compiler doesn't complain about dangling iterator on being dereferenced in its caller (say main function) .

//doesn't return a std::ranges::dangling
auto get_sorted(){
    std::vector<int> vec{1, 2, 99, 5, 9, 4};
    return std::ranges::sort(vec);
}

and when I pass a prvalue vector to the std::ranges::sort algorithm, I again get a std::ranges::dangling as expected

//returns a std::ranges::dangling
auto get_sorted(){
    std::vector<int> vec{1, 2, 99, 5, 9, 4};
    return std::ranges::sort(std::vector<int>{1, 2, 99, 5, 9, 4});
}

For the cases where I don't get an error by compiler regarding std::ragnes::dangling I do observe a runtime error when I compile with fSanitize=address option which is likely because the vectors that were allocated in named variable within the get_sorted function went out of scope as soon as the latter function returned.

However I would like to understand why using named variable within a function changes the return type of get_sorted function and possible a guide on how to use temporaries and prvalues containers correctly to get std::ranges::dangling whenever possible.

2
  • It's because your vector becomes unavailable / goes out of bounds. If you mark your vector static and you return a reference to the vector, your code will probably compile. You do exactly as the example shows: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/ranges/dangling , static_assert(std::is_same_v<std::ranges::dangling, decltype(dangling_iter)>); will trigger. But I'm not 100% sure so I'll leave it as a comment.
    – Raf
    Jan 15 at 9:21
  • All of your vectors get destroyed after the sort (+return) calls.
    – Raf
    Jan 15 at 9:29

3 Answers 3

5

Actually I think I'm pretty sure it's because the code is creating temporaries that go out-of-bounds. The example code on https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/ranges/dangling perfectly shows what you are doing, produces this behaviour.

The code (return std::ranges::sort(get_data());) is triggering the same static assert as in the example: static_assert(std::is_same_v<std::ranges::dangling, decltype(dangling_iter)>);.

This will yield a dangling type when the source goes out of bounds / will become inaccessible after the sort operation.

What you did in:

//doesn't return a std::ranges::dangling
auto get_sorted(){
    std::vector<int> vec{1, 2, 99, 5, 9, 4};
    return std::ranges::sort(vec);
}

is trick this safety net into unsafe operations - The code using the returned iterator is trying to access freed memory (that's a big no-no). There's no good way to detect this in the standard library, and so std::ranges library is not going to protect you from it. In case of the dangling return type, it's possible to detect a temporary argument with templates. So std::ranges::sort doesn't even do any sorting probably, if implemented efficiently, it just short-circuits to returning the dangling type.

A local variable will become unavailable after it's current scope, and this means that any references become dangling. The std::ranges library is doing it's best to try to protect you from doing this for simple cases (like your first one).

To make the code work you'll have to keep the vector available during any iterator operations:

auto get_data(){
    return std::vector<int>{1, 2, 99, 5, 9, 4};
}

auto get_sorted(std::vector<int>& data){
    return std::ranges::sort(data);
}


int main(){
    auto data = get_data(); // keep the vector in the same scope as the iterator operations
    auto it = get_sorted(data);
    *(it-1);
}

You can also do iterator operations in subscopes as long as you keep the vector alive in the parent scope(s).

To illustrate it live: https://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/b8b2945cfda85a20

As you can see, the vector gets destroyed before get_sorted even finishes.

Remember that containers contain data, and algorithms only provide a view (with iterators) into that data, or they modify existing data, they don't make copies (unless explicitly specified like with std::copy).

4
  • I don't use static keyword to allocate the std::vector in named variable so I don't understand how I have reproduced the example like in the link you posted. It's quite obvious that static variables go out of scope when the program ends, but in my case the variable is not static. I understand also how to make the program safe. I am just looking for an explanation on why there are differences in compilation and program behaviour when I use temporary named variable vs prvalue
    – ggulgulia
    Jan 15 at 9:37
  • 2
    The named variable doesn't return dangling because after the sort call directly, there's nothing dangling. The data is still accessible after the sort call. It becomes inaccessible after the return. The sort(std::vector<int>{}) temporary argument gets immediately destroyed after the sort call finishes, meaning it would return dangling data. The compiler / ranging library doesn't protect you from returning an iterator that will become danging (no way for the library to support that in all cases).
    – Raf
    Jan 15 at 9:40
  • this is something I also guessed but I thought there might be a better explanation. But seems like there's an oversight from standard committee and compiler implementers to not look into this or miss this out... it doesn't help to make C++ any safer than before if there are such loopholes in the language
    – ggulgulia
    Jan 15 at 9:44
  • When using iterators, iterators are a view of the data, not a copy. Iterating / sorting doesn't make a copy, and never will (in the standard). It's for efficiency and performance reasons. In C# you can do this, because it has automatic memory management, and every "complex" object (like vector) is passed as a reference. In C++ arguments can be passed as values, and values have a very strict lifetime. If you want to do this in C++, use smart pointers (but this will be a lot more work to implement).
    – Raf
    Jan 15 at 9:45
3

To solve the issue of dangling iterators, C++ ranges introduce the concept of borrowed_range to indicate that the iterator of such range is still valid when the range is destroyed.

Its definition is as follows:

template<class R>
  concept borrowed_range =
    ranges::range<R> &&
    (std::is_lvalue_reference_v<R> ||
    ranges::enable_borrowed_range<std::remove_cvref_t<R>>);

lvalue ranges are always borrowed ranges because the reference itself does not own the data so if it dies it does not affect the original range.

For rvalue ranges, it is difficult for the compiler to infer whether its iterator can be borrowed, so it needs to specialize enable_borrowed_range to imply that the range is a borrowed range, such as subrange, etc.

In your example, the return type of ranges::sort is borrowed_iterator_t<R>, which will be aliased as dangling when R does not satisfy borrowed_range (See why the standard is designed to return dangling in such case).

According to the definition of borrowed_range, the named vector is an lvalue, so it is a borrowed range, and the rvalue vector is not a borrowed range so ranges::sort always returns dangling, which is the result of your observation.

2

std::ranges::dangling is returned purely based on type and value category analysis. It cannot magically detect other use-after-end-of-lifetime issues and is not a replacement for UB sanitizers.

You seem to expect that

auto get_sorted(){
    auto vec = get_data();
    return std::ranges::sort(vec);
}

to return std::ranges::dangling. However it becomes clear that this is impossible if you save the result first. I think you should agree that the following should not result in std::ranges::dangling:

void sort(){
    auto vec = get_data();
    auto it = std::ranges::sort(vec); //it should not be std::dangling
    *it; //This line should compile
}

If you agree with the above, it makes no sense if adding a return magically changes the type to std::ranges::dangling.

auto get_sorted_2(){
    auto vec = get_data();
    auto it = std::ranges::sort(vec); //it should not be std::dangling
    *it;
    return it;  
}

The way C++ works is that the expression std::ranges::sort(vec) has a fixed type once the type of vec is fixed. It is impossible for the expression to suddenly change to a different type just because of an extra return. The auto in your get_sorted has to deduce to the same type as what auto it would deduce the type for it, and it cannot be std::ranges::dangling.

What std::ranges::dangling tells you is that the constrained algorithm cannot return anything meaningful without the danger of dangling, based solely on the analysis of your call to the algorithm, regardless of any later use.

The document is clear. It is returned for certain constrained algorithms when applied to rvalue ranges that do not model borrowed_range. That's the only case it detects, it does not and cannot detect later usage that would lead to use out of lifetime.

In your code sample, std::ranges::sort is a constrained algorithm called on a rvalue std::vector, which does not model borrowed_range, which basically means it is not possible to obtain an iterator to a rvalue std::vector without the caveat of dangling, that's why it returns std::ranges::dangling. If std::vector had been incorrectly declared to model borrowed_range, the compiler will happily return an iterator instead of std::ranges::dangling. In other words, the compiler determines the return type should be std::ranges::dangling solely on how std::vector advertises itself to behave. It does not really examine the code to see whether something dangles to make this decision.

It is now natural to see why it is designed such that std::ranges::dangling will never be returned for a lvalue range because the returned iterator is at least safe enough to use in the same scope as the range.

Key point: Whether the return type is std::ranges::dangling is the result of a type-level calculation and has nothing to do with actual dangling analysis performed by the compiler (e.g. for emitting warnings).

1
  • I agree with all of the above, but I some how cannot accept that such behavior is not flagged by the standard or the compiler. This just expands the language with more loopholes. Appreciate your explanation though.
    – ggulgulia
    Jan 15 at 14:14

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