149

I have the following query:

INSERT INTO table (a) VALUES (0)
  ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE a=1

I want the ID of either the insert or the update. Usually I run a second query in order to get this as I believe insert_id() only returns the 'inserted' ID and not the updated ID.

Is there a way to INSERT/UPDATE and retrieve the ID of the row without running two queries?

3
  • 3
    Rather than supposing, why don't you test it yourself? The SQL in the edit above does work, and through my testing is faster than catching an insertion fail, using INSERT IGNORE, or selecting to see if there is a duplicate first. Dec 28, 2011 at 1:26
  • 5
    WARNING: The solution proposed works, but the auto_increment value continues to increment, even if there is no insert. If the duplicate key happens often, you may want to run alter table tablename AUTO_INCREMENT = 0; after the above query, to avoid big gaps in your id values. Apr 22, 2016 at 6:00
  • @FrankForte You are joking about alter table at run time, with concurrent users, in production, right?
    – doug65536
    Nov 26, 2021 at 0:29

7 Answers 7

198

Check this page out: https://web.archive.org/web/20150329004325/https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/insert-on-duplicate.html
At the bottom of the page they explain how you can make LAST_INSERT_ID meaningful for updates by passing an expression to that MySQL function.

From the MySQL documentation example:

If a table contains an AUTO_INCREMENT column and INSERT ... UPDATE inserts a row, the LAST_INSERT_ID() function returns the AUTO_INCREMENT value. If the statement updates a row instead, LAST_INSERT_ID() is not meaningful. However, you can work around this by using LAST_INSERT_ID(expr). Suppose that id is the AUTO_INCREMENT column. To make LAST_INSERT_ID() meaningful for updates, insert rows as follows:

INSERT INTO table (a,b,c) VALUES (1,2,3)
  ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE id=LAST_INSERT_ID(id), c=3;
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  • 2
    Somehow I missed that when looking at that page. So the update portion appears as : UPDATE id=LAST_INSERT_ID(id) And that works great. Thanks! Apr 22, 2009 at 22:09
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    It is said that php function mysql_insert_id() returns correct value in both cases: php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-insert-id.php#59718.
    – jayarjo
    Jun 10, 2010 at 13:09
  • 2
    @PetrPeller - well, without looking at the MySQL internals, it probably means that it will produce a value, but that value is not related to the query you just ran. In other words, a problem that is a pain to debug.
    – Jason
    Jul 23, 2013 at 13:46
  • 19
    After 5.1.12 this is supposedly no longer necessary, however I found an exception to that today. If you have an autoincrement pk, and a unique key on say an email address, and the 'on duplicate update' triggers based on the email address, note that the last_insert_id' will NOT be the autoincrement value of the updated row. It appears to be the most recently inserted autoincrement value. This makes a huge difference. The work around is the same as shown here, namely to use id=LAST_INSERT_ID(id) in the updating query.
    – sckd
    Sep 19, 2014 at 9:34
  • 2
    Now the quoted part has changed, for the Docs: If a table contains an AUTO_INCREMENT column and INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE inserts or updates a row, the LAST_INSERT_ID() function returns the AUTO_INCREMENT value.
    – Erenor Paz
    May 16, 2018 at 9:16
39

To be exact, if this is the original query:

INSERT INTO table (a) VALUES (0)
 ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE a=1

and 'id' is the auto-increment primary key than this would be the working solution:

INSERT INTO table (a) VALUES (0)
  ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE id=LAST_INSERT_ID(id), a=1

Is all here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/insert-on-duplicate.html

If a table contains an AUTO_INCREMENT column and INSERT ... UPDATE inserts a row, the LAST_INSERT_ID() function returns the AUTO_INCREMENT value. If the statement updates a row instead, LAST_INSERT_ID() is not meaningful. However, you can work around this by using LAST_INSERT_ID(expr). Suppose that id is the AUTO_INCREMENT column.

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  • 8
    Yes, see the accepted answer for the same what you said. No need to revive 3 year old posts. Thanks for your effort anyway.
    – fancyPants
    Oct 4, 2012 at 9:40
  • 1
    @tombom the only reason why i posted this answer is because the accepted answer is not correct - it won't work if there is nothing to update. Nov 9, 2012 at 23:05
2

You might look at REPLACE, which is essentially a delete/insert if the record exists. But this would change the auto increment field if present, which could break relationships with other data.

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  • 1
    Ah yeah - I'm looking for something that won't get rid of previous ID's Apr 22, 2009 at 18:42
  • 1
    This may be dangerous also because this may also cause deletion of another related data (by constraints).
    – Serge
    Oct 12, 2017 at 13:49
2

I don't know what is your version of MySQL but with InnoDB, there was bug with autoinc

bug in 5.1.20 and corrected in 5.1.23 http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=27405

bug in 5.1.31 and corrected in 5.1.33 http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=42714

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I have come across a problem, when ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE id=LAST_INSERT_ID(id) increment the primary key by 1. So the id of the next input within the session will be incremented by 2

0

It's worth noting, and this might be obvious (but I'll say it anyway for clarity here), that REPLACE will blow away the existing matching row before inserting your new data. ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE will only update the columns you specify and preserves the row.

From the manual:

REPLACE works exactly like INSERT, except that if an old row in the table has the same value as a new row for a PRIMARY KEY or a UNIQUE index, the old row is deleted before the new row is inserted.

0

The existing solutions work if you use autoincrement. I have a situation where the user can define a prefix and it should restart the sequence at 3000. Because of this varied prefix, I cannot use autoincrement, which makes last_insert_id empty for inserts. I solved it with the following:

INSERT INTO seq_table (prefix, id) VALUES ('$user_prefix', LAST_INSERT_ID(3000)) ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE id = LAST_INSERT_ID(id + 1);
SELECT LAST_INSERT_ID();

If the prefix exists, it will increment it and populate last_insert_id. If the prefix does not exist, it will insert the prefix with the value 3000 and populate last_insert_id with 3000.

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