236

Consider the following HTML:

<div class='x'>
    <ul>
        <li>Number one</li>
        <li>Number two</li>
        <li>Number three</li>
        <li>Number four is a bit longer</li>
        <li>Number five</li>
    </ul>
</div>

and the following CSS:

.x {
    -moz-column-count: 3;
    column-count: 3;
    width: 30em;
}

As it stands, Firefox currently renders this similarly to the following:

• Number one    • Number three          bit longer
• Number two    • Number four is a    • Number five

Notice that the fourth item was split between the second and third column. How do I prevent that?

The desired rendering might look something more like:

• Number one    • Number four is a
• Number two      bit longer
• Number three  • Number five

or

• Number one    • Number three        • Number five
• Number two    • Number four is a
                  bit longer

Edit: The width is only specified to demonstrate the unwanted rendering. In the real case, of course there is no fixed width.

  • have you tried to give that li a standalone style? like <li style="width: ???px">Number four is a bit longer</li> ???px = needed width to fit that number four. – rmagnum2002 Oct 16 '11 at 15:55

17 Answers 17

343

The correct way to do this is with the break-inside CSS property:

.x li {
    break-inside: avoid-column;
}

Unfortunately, no browser currently supports this. With Chrome, I was able to use the following, but I couldn't make anything work for Firefox (See Bug 549114):

.x li {
    -webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;
}

The workaround you can do for Firefox if necessary is to wrap your non-breaking content in a table but that is a really, really terrible solution if you can avoid it.

UPDATE

According to the bug report mentioned above, Firefox 20+ supports page-break-inside: avoid as a mechanism for avoiding column breaks inside an element but the below code snippet demonstrates it still not working with lists:

.x {
    -moz-column-count: 3;
    -webkit-column-count: 3;
    column-count: 3;
    width: 30em;
}

.x ul {
    margin: 0;
}

.x li {
    -webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;
    -moz-column-break-inside:avoid;
    -moz-page-break-inside:avoid;
    page-break-inside: avoid;
    break-inside: avoid-column;
}
<div class='x'>
    <ul>
        <li>Number one, one, one, one, one</li>
        <li>Number two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two</li>
        <li>Number three</li>
    </ul>
</div>

As others mention, you can do overflow: hidden or display: inline-block but this removes the bullets shown in the original question. Your solution will vary based on what your goals are.

UPDATE 2 Since Firefox does prevent breaking on display:table and display:inline-block a reliable but non-semantic solution would be to wrap each list item in its own list and apply the style rule there:

.x {
    -moz-column-count: 3;
    -webkit-column-count: 3;
    column-count: 3;
    width: 30em;
}

.x ul {
    margin: 0;
    -webkit-column-break-inside: avoid; /* Chrome, Safari */
    page-break-inside: avoid;           /* Theoretically FF 20+ */
    break-inside: avoid-column;         /* IE 11 */
    display:table;                      /* Actually FF 20+ */
}
<div class='x'>
    <ul>
        <li>Number one, one, one, one, one</li>
    </ul>
    <ul>
        <li>Number two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two, two</li>
    </ul>
    <ul>
        <li>Number three</li>
    </ul>
</div>

  • 4
    I believe Opera 11.5 supports break-inside: avoid-column – Alohci Oct 16 '11 at 21:26
  • 2
    Looking at Comment 15 page-break-inside:avoid should work in FF 20. – Brian Nickel Jul 22 '13 at 15:55
  • 21
    At year 2014, the right syntax seems to be: -webkit-column-break-inside:avoid; -moz-column-break-inside:avoid; -o-column-break-inside:avoid; -ms-column-break-inside:avoid; column-break-inside:avoid; – Carles Jove i Buxeda May 8 '14 at 4:35
  • 3
    @CarlesJoveBuxeda Not seeing any improvement in Firefox 31. Neither column-break-inside or page-break-inside (with or without prefix) are working. – Brian Nickel Aug 15 '14 at 16:26
  • 5
    It's a little late, but as this is still an issue in 2018 this might be useful to others who end up here. If anyone is still having bugs between browsers with this, overflow: hidden is the better option. display: inline-block; causes new quirks with Chrome, unfortunately. – SilasOtoko Feb 6 '18 at 16:28
154

Adding;

display: inline-block;

to the child elements will prevent them being split between columns.

  • 1
    This is good. A possible way to prevent the bad behavior of inline-block causing stuff to now get squished on one line (if they are too short) is to further wrap this with a display:block element. This will likely be a solid Firefox workaround for now. – Steven Lu May 5 '13 at 3:37
  • This solution removes the list item, so if you're using order lists for example this wouldn't be an alternative. – Ricardo Zea Jul 23 '13 at 17:19
  • Works perfectly for splitting up paragraphs into columns. – ChrisC Oct 21 '13 at 15:57
  • for list items, this can work if you embed the content of the list item (li) within a "span" element set with the "display:inline-block". The situation is much more complex if you want to control where to break pages or columns within tables : you would like to avoid breaks within table rows (tr). Really, multi-columns layouts are still difficult to setup, but we need it to allow sites to adapt to very narrow screens (such as smartphones) and to wide displays (where very narrow colulns are really unfair. – verdy_p Jan 8 '14 at 4:23
  • 4
    Works for my <li> but I had to add width:100%; to prevent them from stacking horizontally. – Justin Mar 27 '14 at 23:15
46

set following to the style of the element that you don't want to break:

overflow: hidden; /* fix for Firefox */
break-inside: avoid-column;
-webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;
  • 1
    Thank you!! I was having problem with FF and this fix it! – Francis Perron Jul 26 '13 at 17:55
  • Me too. The above solutions weren't working for me, but yours did. Kudos! – Maxx Feb 20 '14 at 2:49
  • This does work on FF and it doesn't actually hide my content! – Justin Mar 27 '14 at 23:12
  • 3
    This works but I don't understand why?? – Fisu May 6 '14 at 9:14
  • 1
    Actually, the overflow:hidden rule is not a fix for the other rules, it is what causes the nonbreaking layout… – Gras Double Feb 23 '17 at 13:05
22

As of October 2014, break-inside still seems to be buggy in Firefox and IE 10-11. However, adding overflow: hidden to the element, along with the break-inside: avoid, seems to make it work in Firefox and IE 10-11. I am currently using:

overflow: hidden; /* Fix for firefox and IE 10-11  */
-webkit-column-break-inside: avoid; /* Chrome, Safari, Opera */
page-break-inside: avoid; /* Firefox */
break-inside: avoid; /* IE 10+ */
break-inside: avoid-column;
  • This seems to be the most exhaustive list – binaryfunt Sep 25 '15 at 16:02
10

Firefox now supports this:

page-break-inside: avoid;

This solves the problem of elements breaking across columns.

  • Have you got this working? I am looking at this fiddle in FF 22 and it doesn't work: jsfiddle.net/bnickel/5qwMf – Brian Nickel Jul 22 '13 at 16:05
  • Same here, doesn't work in Firefox 22. Also, Firebug only displays page-break-before: or page-break-after: but not page-break-inside: – Ricardo Zea Jul 23 '13 at 17:21
  • Version 28 of Firefox. This is the only one that works for me yet, thanks! – Sander Verhagen Apr 11 '14 at 8:11
9

The accepted answer is now two years old and things appear to have changed.

This article explains the use of the column-break-inside property. I can't say how or why this differs from break-inside, because only the latter appears to be documented in the W3 spec. However, the Chrome and Firefox support the following:

li {
    -webkit-column-break-inside:avoid;
       -moz-column-break-inside:avoid;
            column-break-inside:avoid;
}
  • This does not work for a general <div class="a"> where "a" replaces your "Li" above. The div still broke inside. FF 26 – Nasser Dec 29 '13 at 0:02
  • Not a bug. the code above is correct for the described function even if its selector is just for an li element. You could still use another CSS selector "div.a {...}" instead of "li{...}" in this sample. – verdy_p Jan 8 '14 at 4:06
  • However Chrome still does not support -webkit-column-break-inside:avoid; on a table row: this does not work and we still cannot avoid breaking tables in bad positions (notably if a tale cell does not just contain text but icons; but Chrome also appears to split at any vertical position in the middle of a text line, breaking the text with the upper part of text glyphs at bottom of the first column, and the lower part of text glyphs at top of the next column !!! The result is absolutely unreadable !!! – verdy_p Jan 8 '14 at 4:10
  • As of 2017, column-break-inside does not seem to be a valid css property. MDN only says "Edge also supports the non-standard -webkit-column-break-inside variant." – Jacob C. Oct 12 '17 at 20:52
9

This works for me in 2015 :

li {
  -webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;
  /* Chrome, Safari, Opera */
  page-break-inside: avoid;
  /* Firefox */
  break-inside: avoid;
  /* IE 10+ */
}
.x {
  -moz-column-count: 3;
  column-count: 3;
  width: 30em;
}
<div class='x'>
  <ul>
    <li>Number one</li>
    <li>Number two</li>
    <li>Number three</li>
    <li>Number four is a bit longer</li>
    <li>Number five</li>
  </ul>
</div>

  • This is working for me on ul elements, is posted on CSS tricks: css-tricks.com/almanac/properties/b/break-inside, and seems correct based on caniuse compatibility notes: "Partial support refers to not supporting the break-before, break-after, break-inside properties. WebKit- and Blink-based browsers do have equivalent support for the non-standard -webkit-column-break-* properties to accomplish the same result (but only the auto and always values). Firefox does not support break-* but does support the page-break-* properties to accomplish the same result." – nabrown Jan 16 at 22:56
3

The following code works to prevent column breaks inside elements:

-webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;
-moz-column-break-inside: avoid;
-o-column-break-inside: avoid;
-ms-column-break-inside: avoid;
column-break-inside: avoid;
2

Firefox 26 seems to require

page-break-inside: avoid;

And Chrome 32 needs

-webkit-column-break-inside:avoid;
   -moz-column-break-inside:avoid;
        column-break-inside:avoid;
1

A possible workaround for Firefox is to set the CSS property "display" of the element you don't want to have a break inside to "table". I don't know if it works for the LI tag (you'll probably lose the list -item-style), but it works for the P tag.

  • This solution removes the list item, so if you're using order lists for example this wouldn't be an alternative. – Ricardo Zea Jul 23 '13 at 17:19
1

I had the same problem i think and found a solution in this:

-webkit-column-fill: auto; /* Chrome, Safari, Opera */
-moz-column-fill: auto; /* Firefox */
column-fill: auto;  

Working also in FF 38.0.5: http://jsfiddle.net/rkzj8qnv/

  • This solution helps me – OzzyCzech Jan 12 '16 at 16:16
1

I just fixed some divs that were splitting onto the next column by adding

overflow: auto

to the child divs.

*Realized it only fixes it in Firefox!

1

I faced same issue while using card-columns

i fixed it using

 display: inline-flex ;
 column-break-inside: avoid;
 width:100%;
1
<style>
ul li{display: table;}  
</style>

works perfectly

0

I made an update of the actual answer.

This seems to be working on firefox and chrome: http://jsfiddle.net/gatsbimantico/QJeB7/1/embedded/result/

.x{
columns: 5em;
-webkit-columns: 5em; /* Safari and Chrome */
-moz-columns: 5em; /* Firefox */
}
.x li{
    float:left;
    break-inside: avoid-column;
    -webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;  /* Safari and Chrome */
}

Note: The float property seems to be the one making the block behaviour.

0

This answer might only apply to certain circumstances; If you set a height to your elements, this will be obeyed by the column styling. There-by keeping anything that is contained within that height to a row.

I had a list, like the op, but it contained two elements, items and buttons to act upon those items. I treated it like a table <ul> - table, <li> - table-row, <div> - table-cell put the UL in a 4 column layout. The columns were sometimes being split between the item and it's buttons. The trick I used was to give the Div elements a line height to cover the buttons.

0

In 2019, having this works for me on Chrome, Firefox and Opera (after many other unsuccessful attempts):

.content {
    margin: 0;
    -webkit-column-break-inside: avoid;
    break-inside: avoid;
    break-inside: avoid-column;
}

li {
    -webkit-column-break-inside:avoid;
       -moz-column-break-inside:avoid;
            column-break-inside:avoid;
           break-inside: avoid-column;
             page-break-inside: avoid;
}

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