1

Here is small test C program which just intentionally crashes:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(void) {
    char *l = getenv("LANG");
    printf("LANG = %s\n", l);
    int *ptr = (int*)0x12345;
    *ptr = 12345;
    return 0;
}

"Output":

$ ./a.out 
LANG = ru_RU.UTF-8
Ошибка сегментирования

The message about crash is in Russian, in accordance with the LANG environment variable value, ok. Now, I want to see the message about crash in English ("Segmentation fault"), but running the program with explicit "LANG=C" does not work:

$ LANG=C ./a.out 
LANG = C
Ошибка сегментирования

Why is the message still translated?

My system: Linux Mint 21.3 (Virginia), gcc 11.4.0.

$ locale -a
C
C.utf8
... 

An addition, another similar example (double free):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(void) {
    char *l = getenv("LANG");
    printf("LANG = %s\n", l);
    int *ptr = malloc(128 * sizeof(int));
    free(ptr);
    free(ptr);
    return 0;
}
  1. Output when LANG=ru_RU.UTF-8
    $ ./a.out 
    LANG = ru_RU.UTF-8
    free(): double free detected in tcache 2
    Аварийный останов
  1. Output when LANG=C
    $ LANG=C ./a.out 
    LANG = C
    free(): double free detected in tcache 2
    Аварийный останов

From /usr/share/locale-langpack/ru/LC_MESSAGES/libc.mo:

    msgid "Aborted"
    msgstr "Аварийный останов"
3
  • I was going to say because the kernel has the language hard-coded and doesn't care about the shell's environment settings. But that's an excellent question; I can't see any trace of "сегментирования" in the kernel source tree and wonder how you got that in the first place - but then I have no idea what Mint does in terms of localisation of the base install.
    – tink
    Jan 31 at 17:00
  • "I can't see any trace of "сегментирования" " - the message and it's translation is in /usr/share/locale-langpack/ru/LC_MESSAGES/libc.mo: msgid "Segmentation fault" msgstr "Ошибка сегментирования", where it should be.
    – dee0xeed
    Jan 31 at 18:32
  • "what Mint does in terms of localisation" It's not only in Mint, Debian 8 (jessie) - same picture.
    – dee0xeed
    Jan 31 at 18:36

1 Answer 1

1

When you put a variable assignment at the beginning of the command, the environment variable is only exported to the child process that executes the command, it's not in the environment of the current shell process.

When a process crashes due to a signal, the description of the signal is written by the shell process. So it's using your original LANG environment, not the environment of the subprocess.

To get the error message in LANG=C you need to run the program from a child shell:

LANG=C bash -c './a.out'
2
  • Does not matter. The program do see LANG envvar as "C", it prints it before de-referencing bad pointer - "LANG=C bash -c './a.out' LANG = C Ошибка сегментирования"
    – dee0xeed
    Jan 31 at 19:57
  • root@mono:~# ls -l итого 0 root@mono:~# LANG=C ls -l total 0 What's wrong with libc's "Segmentation fault"?
    – dee0xeed
    Jan 31 at 20:25

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