70

I have a Python script with a docstring. When the parsing of the command-line arguments does not succeed, I want to print the docstring for the user's information.

Is there any way to do this?

Minimal example

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""
Usage: script.py

This describes the script.
"""

import sys


if len(sys.argv) < 2:
    print("<here comes the docstring>")
79

The docstring is stored in the module's __doc__ global.

print(__doc__)

By the way, this goes for any module: import sys; print(sys.__doc__). Docstrings of functions and classes are also in their __doc__ attribute.

  • 1
    That definitely works, but there is another way that shows a more native looking module help interface:: help(module_name) after you import that module. – danbgray May 3 '16 at 14:33
  • @danbgray I think what you are getting at is what argparse is used for – jamescampbell Mar 18 '19 at 16:29
13

Here is an alternative that does not hardcode the script's filename, but instead uses sys.argv[0] to print it. Using %(scriptName)s instead of %s improves readability of the code.

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""
Usage: %(scriptName)s

This describes the script.
"""

import sys
if len(sys.argv) < 2:
   print __doc__ % {'scriptName' : sys.argv[0].split("/")[-1]}
   sys.exit(0)
  • thanks. I usually have a usage() function that uses sys.argv[0] which is called before printing the docstring. – thias Feb 25 '13 at 9:59
  • @wint3rschlaefer, could you explain how Usage: %(scriptName)s get the script name? What is this mechanism called in python? – olala Jan 24 '16 at 16:40
  • 1
    @olala, the script name is simply the file name which will appear in sys.argv[0]. Splitting at "/" and taking only the last part removes the full path if present. – wint3rschlaefer Apr 14 '16 at 13:45
  • 1
    @wint3rschlaefer Maybe it's worth updating with a python3 version, like """Usage: {scriptName}""".format(scriptName = sys.argv[0]) – Cimbali Aug 9 '16 at 10:38
9

Argument parsing should always be done with argparse.

You can display the __doc__ string by passing it to the description parameter of Argparse:

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""
This describes the script.
"""


if __name__ == '__main__':
    from argparse import ArgumentParser
    parser = ArgumentParser(description=__doc__)
    # Add your arguments here
    parser.add_argument("-f", "--file", dest="myFilenameVariable",
                        required=True,
                        help="write report to FILE", metavar="FILE")
    args = parser.parse_args()
    print(args.myFilenameVariable)

If you call this mysuperscript.py and execute it you get:

$ ./mysuperscript.py --help
usage: mysuperscript.py [-h] -f FILE

This describes the script.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -f FILE, --file FILE  write report to FILE
0

I got such problem, walked over the web, and fortunately found the answer, learned sys module, and created a script in Python, here is it

if __name__=='__main__':
 if len(sys.argv)==2 and sys.argv[1]=='--help':
    print(__doc__)

by typing ./yourscriptname.py --help or python3 yourscriptname.py --help it will show your docstring

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