53

I have a data frame, which looks like that:

    P1  P2  P3  T1  T2  T3  I1  I2
1   2   3   5   52  43  61  6   "b"
2   6   4   3   72  NA  59  1   "a"
3   1   5   6   55  48  60  6   "f"
4   2   4   4   65  64  58  2   "b"

I want to sort it by I1 in descending order, and rows with the same value in I1 by I2 in ascending order, getting the rows in the order 1 3 4 2. But the order function seems to only take one decreasing argument, which is then TRUE or FALSE for all ordering vectors at once. How do I get my sort correct?

13 Answers 13

50

I used this code to produce your desired output. Is this what you were after?

rum <- read.table(textConnection("P1  P2  P3  T1  T2  T3  I1  I2
2   3   5   52  43  61  6   b
6   4   3   72  NA  59  1   a
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   f
2   4   4   65  64  58  2   b"), header = TRUE)
rum$I2 <- as.character(rum$I2)
rum[order(rum$I1, rev(rum$I2), decreasing = TRUE), ]

  P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2
1  2  3  5 52 43 61  6  b
3  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  f
4  2  4  4 65 64 58  2  b
2  6  4  3 72 NA 59  1  a
4
  • Thank you. I am still a bit overwhelmed by everything R has, and did not know about the rev function. In the meantime, I had figured it out that if the second vector is numeric, I could order by max minus the vector, but the character vector was still a problem until you answered.
    – rumtscho
    Oct 17, 2011 at 15:15
  • @rumtscho yes, that's how it's done in the help file of order which is where I got my inspiration from. ;) Oct 18, 2011 at 7:54
  • 11
    Be sure to check out @dudusan's answer for data where this method would fail. The problem is that using rev() no longer keeps the rows all together, it simply flips the column upside down. It only worked in this case because the example was "nicely" arranged.
    – MrFlick
    May 10, 2014 at 6:30
  • 1
    Please see below the answer by @dudusan, this answer is sadly not correct! Oct 14, 2021 at 17:26
32

I use rank:

rum <- read.table(textConnection("P1  P2  P3  T1  T2  T3  I1  I2
2   3   5   52  43  61  6   b
6   4   3   72  NA  59  1   a
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   f
2   4   4   65  64  58  2   b
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   c"), header = TRUE)

> rum[order(rum$I1, -rank(rum$I2), decreasing = TRUE), ]
  P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2
1  2  3  5 52 43 61  6  b
5  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  c
3  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  f
4  2  4  4 65 64 58  2  b
2  6  4  3 72 NA 59  1  a
3
  • 3
    Simple one without rank : rum[order(rum$I1, -rum$I2, decreasing = TRUE), ] Nov 19, 2015 at 11:36
  • Thanks, helped me ordeing my date column (whcih does not work with -)
    – shosaco
    Apr 11, 2020 at 18:03
  • @SomnathKadam the minus sign doesn't work in front of character vectors -c("a") returns an errors
    – Luke
    Jul 1, 2020 at 13:09
25

I'm afraid Roman Luštrik's answer is wrong. It works on this input by chance. Consider for example its output on a very similar input (with an additional line similar to the original line 3 with "c" in the I2 column):

rum <- read.table(textConnection("P1  P2  P3  T1  T2  T3  I1  I2
2   3   5   52  43  61  6   b
6   4   3   72  NA  59  1   a
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   f
2   4   4   65  64  58  2   b
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   c"), header = TRUE)

rum$I2 <- as.character(rum$I2)
rum[order(rum$I1, rev(rum$I2), decreasing = TRUE), ]

  P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2
3  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  f
1  2  3  5 52 43 61  6  b
5  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  c
4  2  4  4 65 64 58  2  b
2  6  4  3 72 NA 59  1  a

This is not the desired result: the first three values of I2 are f b c instead of b c f, which would be expected since the secondary sort is I2 in ascending order.

To get the reverse order of I2, you want the large values to be small and vice versa. For numeric values multiplying by -1 will do it, but for characters its a bit more tricky. A general solution for characters/strings would be to go through factors, reverse the levels (to make large values small and small values large) and change the factor back to characters:

rum <- read.table(textConnection("P1  P2  P3  T1  T2  T3  I1  I2
2   3   5   52  43  61  6   b
6   4   3   72  NA  59  1   a
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   f
2   4   4   65  64  58  2   b
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   c"), header = TRUE)

f=factor(rum$I2)
levels(f) = rev(levels(f))
rum[order(rum$I1, as.character(f), decreasing = TRUE), ]

  P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2
1  2  3  5 52 43 61  6  b
5  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  c
3  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  f
4  2  4  4 65 64 58  2  b
2  6  4  3 72 NA 59  1  a
1
  • Check out Michele's answer, which seems to work and is more straightforward than my own.
    – dudusan
    Sep 26, 2016 at 6:19
5

Let df be the data frame with 2 fields A and B

Case 1: if your field A and B are numeric

df[order(df[,1],df[,2]),] - sorts fields A and B in ascending order
df[order(df[,1],-df[,2]),] - sorts fields A in ascending and B in descending order
priority is given to A.

Case 2: if field A or B is non numeric say factor or character

In our case if B is character and we want to sort in reverse order
df[order(df[,1],-as.numeric(as.factor(df[,2]))),] -> this sorts field A(numerical) in ascending and field B(character) in descending.
priority is given to A.

The idea is that you can apply -sign in order function ony on numericals. So for sorting character strings in descending order you have to coerce them to numericals.

4
    library(dplyr)
    library(tidyr)
    #supposing you want to arrange column 'c' in descending order and 'd' in ascending order. name of data frame is df
    ## first doing descending
    df<-arrange(df,desc(c))
    ## then the ascending order of col 'd;
    df <-arrange(df,d)
3

The default sort is stable, so we sort twice: First by the minor key, then by the major key

rum1 <- rum[order(rum$I2, decreasing = FALSE),]
rum2 <- rum1[order(rum1$I1, decreasing = TRUE),]
3

Simple one without rank :

rum[order(rum$I1, -rum$I2, decreasing = TRUE), ]
1
rum[order(rum$T1, -rum$T2 ), ]
2
  • 1
    clarify answer with explanation
    – IanO.S.
    Jan 24, 2013 at 12:16
  • 1
    This does not always work. If T2 is a date vector it will give the error: Error in -.Date(rum$T2) : unary - is not defined for Date objects. This doesn't apply to the specific example provided but as general advice it's good to know.
    – tjnel
    Apr 25, 2013 at 1:13
0

The correct way is:

rum[order(rum$T1, rum$T2, decreasing=c(T,F)), ]
3
  • 5
    This would be very neat, but doesn't seem to work: compare the output of Roman Luštrik's rum[order(rum$I1, rev(rum$I2), decreasing = TRUE), ] to your rum[order(rum$I1, rum$I2, decreasing = c(TRUE, FALSE)), ]. I don't think decreasing accepts a vector of values. Nov 20, 2011 at 8:04
  • 2
    This is just wrong. Decreasing does not accept a vector, and this answer should not be relied on.
    – TARehman
    Mar 17, 2015 at 21:57
  • This will actually work (in at least R 3.4.0) since the default method="auto" will use "radix" for "short numeric vectors, integer vectors, logical vectors and factors", and "decreasing" can be a vector when "radix" is used. See the docs here
    – Giuseppe
    Dec 4, 2017 at 17:49
0

In @dudusan's example, you could also reverse the order of I1, and then sort ascending:

> rum <- read.table(textConnection("P1  P2  P3  T1  T2  T3  I1  I2
+   2   3   5   52  43  61  6   b
+   6   4   3   72  NA  59  1   a
+   1   5   6   55  48  60  6   f
+   2   4   4   65  64  58  2   b
+   1   5   6   55  48  60  6   c"), header = TRUE)
> f=factor(rum$I1)   
> levels(f) <- sort(levels(f), decreasing = TRUE)
> rum[order(as.character(f), rum$I2), ]
  P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2
1  2  3  5 52 43 61  6  b
5  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  c
3  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  f
4  2  4  4 65 64 58  2  b
2  6  4  3 72 NA 59  1  a
> 

This seems a bit shorter, you don't reverse the order of I2 twice.

0

you can use the amazing package dplyr there is a function called arrange. you just set the data-frame and the columns you want to order considering the hierarchy you choose. the defualt is ascending order. but if you want in descreasing order you use the command desc.

rum <- read.table(textConnection("P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2 2 3 5 52 43 61 6 b 6 4 3 72 NA 59 1 a 1 5 6 55 48 60 6 f 2 4 4 65 64 58 2 b"), header = TRUE)

library(dplyr)
arrange(rum,desc(I1),I2)

1
  • Please, show the output of your command in order to verify the correctness. Also, your answer relies on functions from an add-on package which has not been mentioned. Please, add the relevant library() call. Thank you.
    – Uwe
    Mar 31, 2021 at 17:40
0

decreasing data frame column

df<- df[order(df$Differece, decreasing = TRUE),]

df<- df[order(df$Differece, decreasing = FALSE),]
0

In general, xtfrm() is the generic function to get a numeric vector that sorts like the given input vector. Decreasing sorting can then be done by sorting with the negated value of xtfrm(). (This is exactly how e.g. dplyr’s desc() is implemented.)

For example, with the data in question:

df <- read.table(text = "
P1  P2  P3  T1  T2  T3  I1  I2
2   3   5   52  43  61  6   b
6   4   3   72  NA  59  1   a
1   5   6   55  48  60  6   f
2   4   4   65  64  58  2   b
", header = TRUE)

df[order(-xtfrm(df$I1), df$I2), ]
#>   P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2
#> 1  2  3  5 52 43 61  6  b
#> 3  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  f
#> 4  2  4  4 65 64 58  2  b
#> 2  6  4  3 72 NA 59  1  a

This approach can be generalized into a base R function to sort data frames by given columns, that also accepts a vector-valued decreasing argument. From my answer to this recent question:

sortdf <- function(x, by = colnames(x), decreasing = FALSE) {
  x[do.call(order, Map(sortproxy, x[by], decreasing)), , drop = FALSE]
}

sortproxy <- function(x, decreasing = FALSE) {
  as.integer((-1)^as.logical(decreasing)) * xtfrm(x)
}

And with the current example data, we (of course) get:

sortdf(df, by = c("I1", "I2"), decreasing = c(TRUE, FALSE))
#>   P1 P2 P3 T1 T2 T3 I1 I2
#> 1  2  3  5 52 43 61  6  b
#> 3  1  5  6 55 48 60  6  f
#> 4  2  4  4 65 64 58  2  b
#> 2  6  4  3 72 NA 59  1  a

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